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Inns

The 1847 Map shows a total of no less than 12 inns in the Head Row area. All of them fronted onto the Headrow, except for the Marquis of Granby Inn and the Malt Mill Inn which were in yards to the north of the Lower Head Row. Although the map was made in the nineteenth century, it is probable that all these inns were present in the seventeenth century, and some even earlier.

The Cock and Bottle
Situated on the South east side of the Upper Head Row, the Cock and Bottle was a coaching Inn. In the 1830s a coach called 'the Eclipse' ran to Ilkley every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday from the Cock and Bottle Inn. It was worked by Reuben Craven of the Woolpack Inn, Yeadon. The Yorkshire Evening Post names it as one of five theatrical pubs in Leeds which catered for the performers appearing at the Hippodrome, which was situated behind the pub in King Charles' Croft. By the 1930s the Cock and Bottle was surrounded by the buildings of Schofields department store. In January 1938 the owner retired, and in March of that year he sold the inn to Snowden Schofield the owner of the store. The pub became part of the store until in 1961 it was demolished when the new Schofields store was built. The license of the Cock and Bottle was transferred to the New Eagle in York Road.

The Green Dragon. (The Guildford.)
The present building is Victorian/Edwardian, but the description in Jackson's Guide of 1889 indicates that the inn has a much earlier origin. 'An old grey public house fronting the street at Merryboys Hill, adjoining the road to Bradford, the resort of clothiers, was called the Duncan Inn before it became the Green Dragon.' An old print confirms this description. The pub was rebuilt at the end of the nineteenth century as a three storey building, of stone and brick, with arched windows and elaborate carving on the front. The sandstone figures at either end are Atlantes, usually depicted naked, but in this case partly clothed, perhaps so as not to offend the moral sensitivity of Victorian passers-by!

The pub changed hands in 1920-21, and also changed its name from the Green Dragon to Hotel Guildford; that part of the Head Row was Guildford Street at that time. The inn was described in the 1919 sale brochure as an 'old established fully licensed hotel' with among other things 'an imposing billiard room with accommodation for four tables' on the ground floor. There was a dining room, 2 smoke rooms, a private sitting room, committee room, club room, and two bedrooms on the first floor with a further four bedrooms on the second floor. In 1975 it ceased to be a residential hotel, and in 1984, Tetleys, the owners, planned to demolish it, but they were refused permission by the Planning Committee. Instead in 1985, the brewery decided on a scheme for major renovation. In 1988 the building won the second Leeds Award for Architecture for an altered building.

The Three Legs of Man.
The site of this inn is at the north western end of Rockley Hall Yard, and was part of the Rockley Hall estate purchased by John Harrison from the Falkingham family in about 1603.  After his death in 1638 it was held in trust, until 1897 when it became the property of the Leeds Estate Company who redeveloped much of Briggate, including the County Arcade between Briggate and Vicar Lane, at the rear of the Three Legs Inn. The pub was in existence before 1743, when it was kept by William Mitton, and the picture shows the rear of the old building in about 1900, before it was renovated. In 1898 it was sold to a private owner, and in 1902 was bought by Tetleys. Sometime between 1902 and 1914 the pub was extensively renovated. The building also housed a shop which was incorporated into the pub, and the whole of the fašade of the building was renovated with elaborate terracotta and glazed faience work. Inside, the bar is reputed to have come from the Marquis of Granby Inn which was situated on the north east side of the Lower Head Row and was demolished when the Headrow was widened in 1928.

The Malt Shovel Inn.
Although not named on the 1847 map, this was an old established Inn, and was mentioned in directories as far back as 1798, but there is little information about it. It was neither a coaching Inn nor a hotel. The landlord, his wife and children are all listed in the 1851 census, but there were no live-in staff. The inn was demolished when the Headrow was widened in 1928.

The Haunch of Venison
Little is known about this inn, which was situated on the southeast corner of the junction of the Headow and Lands Lane, and is shown on the 1847 Ordnance survey map. Jackson in his 1889 guide gives it as the site of Crosby House, built by the husband of Mrs. Crosby who attempted to help King Charles I escape from Red Hall.

The Horse and Trumpet.
Situated on the south east side of the Headrow, just before the junction with Briggate, this is a three storey, late Victorian building, but was preceded by an older building, shown on the 1847 map. The pub was sold to Tetley's in 1899, by the then owner, William Child.

North Eastern Side of the Headrow
The inns on the north east side of the Headrow were all demolished when the street was widened in the 1920s. There is little information on these inns, but some photographs survive to show us what they were like. The Nag's Head, the Wheatsheaf, the King's Arms and the Unicorn all fronted onto the Headrow. The Malt Mill Inn and the Marquis of Granby (not to be confused with the Marquis of Granby on Lady Lane) were situated in yards off the Lowerhead Row.



Associated Links
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Click images to enlarge
Cock and Bottle
Cock and Bottle
Green Dragon (later Guildford Hotel)
Green Dragon (later Guildford Hotel)
Guildford Hotel, 1949
Guildford Hotel, 1949
Three Legs of Man, before alteration
Three Legs of Man, before alteration
Three Legs of Man
Three Legs of Man
Malt Shovel Inn, c.1907
Malt Shovel Inn, c.1907
Horse and Trumpet, 1949
Horse and Trumpet, 1949
Nag's Head Inn, 1928
Nag's Head Inn, 1928
Malt Mill Inn Yard
Malt Mill Inn Yard
Marquis of Granby Yard, 1925
Marquis of Granby Yard, 1925
Unicorn Inn
Unicorn Inn




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© 2003 Leeds City Council | Site created by: LCC electronic information team | 25 March 2003