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So what is Leeds like to-day? What has happened to the industries which thrived in Leeds in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries? Is Leeds still 'the city that makes everything'?

Leeds has maintained its status as a major industrial city; it is the regional capital of Yorkshire and the Humber, and has the second most diverse economy of any British city; it is the second largest employer outside London for the manufacturing industry. The old manufacturing industries like engineering and printing have undergone changes to keep pace with new technology and changing markets and are still important. Some of the old firms are still there, often trading under a different name. New industries have grown up, particularly in the media and ccmmunication sector. The growth in the economy of Leeds has been remarkable; between 1981 and 2000 more jobs were created in Leeds than in any other major city except London.

Some of the old factory buildings have survived, like Marshall's Temple Mills, which had housed Kay's Ltd., a mail order company, it is now part of Holbeck Urban Village and plans have been submitted (2008)for the site to become a cultural and retail facility. Bank Mills on the waterfront at Rose Wharf is now the premises of Poulter plc. Other industrial buildings, like Crispin House, (Heaton's old factory) have been converted to luxury apartments or into offices and premises for small businesses.  Just as in the late eighteenth century, when Gott, Marshall and Murray started out in business  'industrial Leeds' is dependant on the dynamism and vision of its entrepreneurs, and the commitment and adaptability of its workforce.

Click images to enlarge
Temple Mills (Kays) 1999
Temple Mills (Kays) 1999
Bank Mills (Poulter's) 1999
Bank Mills (Poulter's) 1999
Crispin House (Heaton's 1999)
Crispin House (Heaton's 1999)




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