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Development

1600-1800 the Upper Head Row and the Lower Head Row are narrow streets lined with houses, shops and inns. Behind them the gardens are becoming yards built up with cottages and workshops. Park Estate is built at the west end of the Headrow, while at the east end are mills factories and working class housing.



1800-1900 The Headrow is still a narrow cobbled street, but by 1850 there are two new places of worship, Oxford Place Chapel and St. Anne's Cathedral, on the Headrow. At the west end the magnificent Town Hall is built, followed by the Municipal Buildings and the Art Gallery. Charles Thornton builds his block of shops and offices, and Victoria arcade is built on the south side.



1900-1950 A statue of Queen Victoria is erected in Victoria Square. Snowden Schofield starts up in business in the Victoria Arcade. Increasing traffic congestion leads to the widening of the Headrow. Much of the property on the north side of the street is demolished, and replaced with buildings designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield. The Headrow is now a wide street, with buildings of a uniform design along its length. There is a new Garden of Rest beside the Art Gallery.



1950-2000 Headrow House, the last of the buildings matching Blomfield's design is put up on the north side of the street. Schofields new store is built, sold, rebuilt, and closed, and one of the most famous names on the Headrow is lost forever. The Art Gallery is extended and 'Reclining Woman 80' makes her appearance. New offices are built and old buildings are refurbished.
Click images to enlarge
Cock and Bottle Inn, c.1906
Cock and Bottle Inn, c.1906
Town Hall, 1858
Town Hall, 1858
Old Headrow
Old Headrow
New Headrow
New Headrow
Headrow Centre, 1999
Headrow Centre, 1999




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© 2003 Leeds City Council | Site created by: LCC electronic information team | 25 March 2003