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Harehills, Aerial View


Harehills, Aerial View
Description:
16th February 1988. In the top left corner is Stanley Road at the junction with Beckett Street and Harehills Road. The corner of Beckett Street Cemetery can be seen. Moving right, in the centre of the top half of the view is Florence Street. Compton Road runs left to right through the middle, Compton Road Library is on the right of the photograph, at the junction with Harehills Lane. In the bottom right corner can be seen the site of the original Brownhill School which was later used for housing. On the left, factory premises on Hudson Road were formerly Burton's tailors.

User Comments:

Name:
lynne barber

Comment:
in the top left corner can be seen beckett street cemetary and the large brown space middle right is the site of the original brownhill school obviousley newly demolished in this view.

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Name:
Gary Wilson

Comment:
I used to go to Brownhill School in the 60's. Does anyone have any photos of it?

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Name:
Anita Smith

Comment:
Does anyone have a photo of Brownhill School That was off Harehills Lane

Email:
samse2@ntlworld.com

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Name:
Peter Smith

Comment:
I went to Brownhill school from 1963 to 1969..rumour was, it was built on the site of a mine and was in fact sinking slightly...dont know how true that was....shame it was demolished...it was a lovely red brick edwardian building and i also remember the haunted library upstairs in the boys part of the school.

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Name:
Gary Wilson

Comment:
There was a rumour that there was a ghost in the top floor library. I also seem to remember that the headmaster was called Mr Turner

Email:
gww45@hotmail.com

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Name:
Pete Smith

Comment:
I remember your dad Gary, he was known as Tug Wilson to his mates on sammy ledgards buses, and...the library at brownhill was haunted...i always felt uneasy in there, story goes 2 lads that didnt come back from the first world war took up residencce in there

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Name:
Ian Geldard

Comment:
I also went to Brownhill School (1967-1973). I lived in Brownhill Crescent right opposite the front gates. Also remember the Head, Mr Turner. Never heard the ghost story though! I'd also like to see any photos of the old school!

Email:
igeldardATbtopenworld.com

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Name:
Brian Procter

Comment:
How sad to see the demise of my old school. I passed here a few years ago and was stunned to see it had gone, and replaced with a few houses which were surely unneccesary in this area of over-housing, in view of the closure of Burtons. I'm OLDER than you lot above. I was at this school from approx 1944 (infants), up to 1950 when I passed my scholarship (11+) and went to Central High School. Must admit I don't recall the story of the ghost, but it cetainly wasn't me!

Email:
brianprocter@ntlworld.com

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Name:
paul wood

Comment:
I attended Brownhill Boys School from about 1958 to 1963.My memories are vivid but not all that pleasant.The time I was there Brownhill was a tough school.A few of the students were extremely delinquent and many of the teachers were psychopaths, I am sure.Corporal punishment was a hobby for many of the teachers.We had a weekly library class(I don't recall any mention of hauntings then).The teacher in charge we called "crater face",but I cannot recall his real name.He was a Geordie with a violent temper.At the least provocation he would hurl the wooden chalk board eraser at the unfortunate miscreant.He once grazed the forehead of one pupil and the blood was flowing.It was the only time I remember "crater face" in a panic. Brian Procter,before me and Gary Wilson and Peter Smith,after me seem to have better memories.Maybe my timing was off !I do remember my parents telling me that when they were at school in the 30's Brownhill had a very high reputation as a sports school . The Boy's Headmaster was called Mr Senior during my tenure at Brownhill. I would also like to see a photo of the old school.

Email:
paul.wood@aircanada.ca

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Name:
michael mcguinness

Comment:
On the left hand side of the photo is BURTONS on Hudson Road, all my wife family (their name was WAUDBY) worked there bar one. When I met my wife she was working at Burtons, this would have been in 1958. Met in the Majestic in City Square. If any one out there knows of the family would they please get in touch?

Email:
judy_mcgyinness@msn.com

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Name:
craig mcdermott

Comment:
i went to brownhill school right at the very end of its days when it started to fall down i remember the ceilings falling down on us in class that was when they decided to ship us all off to wigton moor, desperatly want a pic or to see one of the old school, never been able to find one if anyone manages to get one please email me thanks .

Email:
craig.mcdermott30@ntlworld.com

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Name:
frances wicks / kirlew

Comment:
Does anyone remember " the chewing gum girl " in beckett street cemetery ? On compton road end there was a statue of a young girl looking out onto the road and everybody would say " ooh watch out that`s t` chewin gum girl !" apparently she choked on a piece of chewing gum...........anyone remember the statue or the tale from 50`s/60`s.....? I`m sure statue`s still there.

Email:
fwicks@btinternet.com

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Name:
Keith Taylor

Comment:
I was at Brownhill School from 1962 to 1968 and would love to hear from anyone who has a photograph of the place. I remember that Mr Turner was the Headmaster, I also remember being taught by elderly teacher in my early years by the name of Miss/Mrs (?) Sternard. The other teachers I remember from that time were Mr Lockwood and Mr Makram, the latter being an Egyptian.

Email:
keithlufc@aol.com

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Name:
Barry Hallam

Comment:
Brownhill CP School, 1952 to 1957 urgh! I can surely echo the remarks of Paul Wood. He started as I left to start work and it would appear that things didn't change much. My Headmaster was called Mr. Barford, and the two of his liutenants that I remember were: Mr. Broster, and Mr. Pugh. The best teacher by-far, was Mr. Darnborough (science). I'd gone to Brownhill from Becket Street Infants and I was a scared little boy. My first classroom was one of the annexes in the playground. I hadn't been there long, when something dramatic happened; one of those things that stay with you forever. We were in the middle of a lesson when the door burst open, and in stormed the Headmaster. We immediately 'all' stood to attention. Then, Mr. Barford hollered - The KING is DEAD, long LIVE The QUEEN.!! You don't forget something like that. Then I spent two or three years in the main building, before spending my final year in the other annex over by the reservoir mound; there, we were allowed to take our bikes to school. In my penultimate year - in the main building, I was the 'gong' boy. Then there was 'woodwork'... strangely, this was at a special building in the grounds of Becket Street school back where I'd started from. The woodwork teacher was a formidable, but flamboyant character called Mr. Duxbury. I almost severed my thumb with a carving chisel and had to be taken to St. James's hospital casualty. I too do not understand the bit about a 'haunted library'...what library? What really scared me was the school dentist near the Shaftsbury. It caused a fear-of-dentists-phobia in me which I didn't overcome until I was 58 years of age. It was downright barbaric. An assembly-line: mouth held open, smelly gas, then joining half a dozen other kids spitting blood into a big bath. Something else you never forget! Did I like Brownhill School... are you kidding, or what? Still, I could read and write, and I became an Electronics Engineer. Now I'm a pensioner.

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Name:
Paul Wood

Comment:
Although we are seperated by seven years,it seems Barry Hallam and I had very coincidental experiences in our formative years. Barry,I have noted your comments re Beckett Street with great interest.We both went to Beckett Street infants school and then were dropped in to Brownhill.Also,there were sojourns back to Beckett Street for woodwork lessons every week.Remember the girls cookery classes next door ?Three years of my stay at Brownhill were spent in the annex across the road by the reservoir.I am sure a few of the "teachers" we had then were hired right out of the asylum. Looking back it seems comical,but at the time,like Barry relates,they were scary times.Also,we both sampled the skills of the school dentist.I never developed a fear of dentists because most of the time I was overdosed with gas and never knew what was going on until it was all over. Barry's description of the Headmaster bursting in to announce the death of King George VI was amusing,but at the time it must have been frightening for a nine year old. Barry,we lived in interesting times.On the plus side my stay at Brownhill toughened me up mentally and physically and we did manage to learn to read and write in preparation for Leodis half a century later.Barry,drop me an email,I would enjoy a chat.

Email:
paul.wood@aircanada.ca

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Name:
Barry Hallam

Comment:
Hello again everyone. Wherever you go on Leodis, a school will always have the most comments. Sadly, many of the schools were Board Schools and are no more. What I find surprising is how the teachers moved around from school to school... why was this so? It is rather odd to read someone's recollection of a teacher you had, but at a school you weren't at yourself. It would appear - from the sheer variety of memories, that a school's ethos went in phases. Only Paul Wood had bad memories of Brownhill CP similar to mine. However, I feel that I should recall some things that weren't at all unpleasant. School dinners in the nearby chapel were great - especially for the second sitters who got to finish-off the pudding trays. Three and four helpings of ginger-sponge and custard - if you could get to the front quick enough. I liked that bit, a lot. Then 'jam-jars' - anyone remember collecting them for the school-fund? Once a year we'd collect thousands of them. All stacked up against the side wall of the building before a lorry came from 'Moorhouses Jam' to collect them. And the allotment - anyone remember that. It was over the road behind the annexes. We grew carnations (Pinks) which we could buy for a penny each. Inter-school Sports Day? Held somewhere down Osmandthorpe Lane. It was a long walk home when you lived on Beckett Street and summers were proper summers - hot, or very hot. It was quite normal to knock on someone's door and ask for a drink of water. People were much nicer towards each other in those days. Even though I was miles from home, I felt quite safe. So many memories - so long ago ... can't prove any of it now!

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Name:
Barry Hallam

Comment:
Frances - yes I do remember your statue. My Dad was a Monumental Mason and did a lot of work in that cemetery - it was like a playground to me. Those statues were very expensive - they were usually meant to be either cherubs or angels and marked great sadness. Somewhere in Killingbeck Cemetery is the carved image of my infant hands on a gravestone. My hands were used as a model by my Dad's boss in the 1940's.

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Name:
Margaret

Comment:
I have just been reading Barry Hallam's comments,and particularly his recollection of the school dentist near the Shaftesbury has sent a shiver down my spine! It really was barbaric!! I can't understand how they could have treated small children in that way.I have never really recovered from my fear of dentists, and no wonder!!!

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Name:
Inge zimmerman (Ina Tattersall)

Comment:
I still Hate Dentists. But I loved the Milk which was handed out each day. School dinners, uggh don't even go there, especially when there was a shortage of potatoes one year. I still think it would have made a fine glue.

Date:
30-Oct-2008

Email:
ingezimmerman@yahoo.ca

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Name:
Dave Whittaker

Comment:
Hi to all, there is a facebook group called 'I remember Harehills', any old pats may like to have a look round it, or even join, there are some great photos and personal comments in there.

Date:
07-Feb-2009

Email:
daveywhitt@hotmail.co.uk

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Name:
Peter Creek

Comment:
"Crater Face" was Mr Gates - a real sadist - I saw him break a metre long board ruler over a kid's hand in 1963.

Date:
12-Jul-2009

Email:
creek_petr@hotmail.com

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Name:
Stuart Tordoff

Comment:
Brownhills School……… that black hole of learning the education system should have been thoroughly ashamed of. What was the remit of schools like this? How many other schools in Leeds were of a similar standard? What kind of OFSTED report would they get now? I’m sure many teachers felt they were swimming against the tide - what was the point? They were trying to educate kids who, if they failed the 11 plus were deemed to be failures, not having made it to grammar school. (Through reasons not necessarily the individual pupil’s fault, one could fail the 11 plus simply because of a lack of vacancies at a particular grammar school). This should not have been allowed to happen, primary education in Leeds at the time was producing bright and well-educated pupils. Brownhills and its like did nothing to cultivate and develope these individuals. I believe there was second chance at age 13 (the 13 plus examination), to get a place at grammar school. However I don’t recall getting this opportunity. The outcome being we were given a basic education. Yes we could read and write, but we were just being prepared to become factory fodder. I had the misfortune to be a pupil here from about 1961 to 1963, having being transferred, together with some other poor wretches, including teachers, from Burmantofts school as this was scheduled for demolition under the Newtown / Burmantofts regeneration programme. From day one we were picked on, bullied and treated as outsiders. I cite this and as other contributors have mentioned, certain teachers who seemed to delight in belittling pupils efforts, as my reason for being absent whenever possible. I would do anything to avoid Brownhills and became expert at forging my mothers’ signature on a sick note among other ruses. I even destroyed my end of school report, so she wouldn’t know how often I was absent. I am aware some pupils went on to have good careers and some even have fond memories of the school. Surely we deserved better.

Date:
18-Feb-2010

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Name:
Peter Smith

Comment:
Sorry to read Mr Tordoffs comments, bye the way, it was Brownhill, not Brownhills. I was there from 63 to 69, from 5yrs old to 11. During my time there the senior school was stopped and the whole place was infants and juniors. I have some of my fondest memories there, great days, good teachers, good friends, i am 52 now, wish i was 7 again!!!

Date:
04-Apr-2010

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Name:
Lynne Barber

Comment:
Hi again I have just gone through all the commments and what a mixed bag they are. I was at Brownhill from 52-58 and have some good memories the only photo is a class photo taken in the hall. The whole area between Lupton Avenue and the Stone Rock Lane area used to be open cast mining and there are some old photo's elsewhere.

Date:
08-Apr-2010

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Name:
Tony Green

Comment:
I went to brownhill school roughly from 1957 to 1964 my first teacher was Miss Ashmore other teachers at that time was Mr Exley Mr Lockwood Mr Teal and later Mr Gates Mr Fulford Mr Makram Mr Brooks.head teacher was Mr Senior

Date:
15-Jun-2011

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Name:
J. Tebbs

Comment:
As the saying goes, "I can see my house from up here", junction of Hudson Road (left of picture) and Compton Road (L.to R. middle of pic.), one street back. I, like others on here, attended Brownhill School and have mixed feelings about the place. I was there from the middle 40's (infants), to the middle 50's (seniors). Mr. Coultas was the head when I started senior school, he had a penchant for penmanship and treat all schoolboys as his mortal enemy. About halfway through my schooldays Mr.Coultas retired and was replaced by Mr. Barford, a less tyrannical man. We had an American teacher for a spell, a Mr. Waterman. Some of the teachers I can recall were Hanwell, Hanley, Smith, Pugh, Darnborough, and Quate who each had their own form of punishment of varying severity. Previous subscribers are correct in what they say, that on leaving school, as long as you could read and write the teachers considered their job was done. My recollections are of a school that was sometimes good, sometimes bad - just like its pupils.

Date:
18-Sep-2011

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Name:
Steve Palmer

Comment:
I started at Brownhill Juniors in 54 & then into the seniors which was boys up stairs & girls down stairs. I was in the annexe over Harehills Lane when I failed my 11 plus and in Gates'es class in the library ( I didn't know of any ghost stories) were I passed my 13 plus & went on to Harehills S M open looney bin. I remember the dreaded dentist at the Shaftesberry & the sadistic behavior of some of the teachers, especially Madeley who was so adept with the slipper. He always had an aroma of urin & I'm sure he foamed at the mouth when he dolled out punishment. He was a cricket fanatic & used to take us on to Harehills park & boll full pelt at you on the cocrete wicket. Happy days

Date:
04-Dec-2011

Email:
stephen.palmer.mail@googlemail.com

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Name:
Peter Coultas

Comment:
The road down the middle of this picture is Sutherland Road and during the winter of 1947 all the children used this hill as the sledging run. Chapped knees and wet socks --happy days-but the war was over!! ( the headteacher at Brownhill School was not a relative of mine just in case anyone was wondering!)

Date:
23-May-2012

Email:
peecee49@btinternet.com

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Name:
ALUN PUGH aged 61

Comment:
Some of you may be interested to know that my dad taught at Brownhill,after the war until maybe 1960 or slightly later. He then went to Osmondthorpe,till he retired. Dei Pugh was his name,ex RAF pilot who spent 4 days in a dinghy,Jan.1944,losing 4 of his crew. I remember going to Brownhill as a boy when dad went in on a Saturday to "do things". My first sledge I remember was made from Technical drawing boards from the school!! I have photographs of dad and some staff playing Bingo in the staff room at lunchtime. Not like that in my teaching days!!

Date:
06-Nov-2013

Email:
a.apugh@ntlworld.com

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Name:
Graham Greaves

Comment:
I was at Brownhill and remember Ian Geldard (hiya Ian!). I recall Mr Turner (I remember going into his office (with the vacant/engaged lights- really cool for the 60's) on my last day and his advice was 'aim high' - I did and still do. I remember Mrs Sternard and Mr Makram, and I also recall the first Asian kid to start at the school - a real novelty in those days. Funnily enough my late Dad was the demolition manager at the Council and was in charge of knocking down the old place in the mid '80's - I think I still have some bits of the school he 'liberated'.

Date:
03-Jan-2014

Email:
Graham@grahamgreaves.com

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Name:
wally aveyard

Comment:
I went to Brownhill county primary from 1952to1962 great days cane nearly every week great mates great teachers mr Lockwood PT teacher good old clive .

Date:
13-Feb-2014

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Name:
Anthony Child

Comment:
Remember it well, went there from 64 - ish to 72 ( I think ) .... form teachers, in chronological order were ..... Mrs Alexander, Mrs Tinker, Mrs Sternard, ( infants) - the classrooms were bottom left, bottom right and top right respectively, then to Junior School where it was ... you know, I can't remember the first year, but second was Miss Smith, then Mr Patrick and then Mr Dalzell. Good school, some good teachers - went from there to Shakespeare Middle and then, sadly, to Cross Green

Date:
27-Feb-2014

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Name:
Anthony Child

Comment:
Re - my above post, it was Mrs Vaughan who was my class teacher in the first year in the juniors - I was awake all night trying to think of that ...

Date:
28-Feb-2014

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Name:
Colin Maloney

Comment:
i attended brownhill from 1956 to 1961/62.remember a few teachers mr garside music,mr teal,mr exley.and the teacher from hell mr gough he would clobber you with anything that came to hand,his best one would be to stand you on the window sill 3 floors up.and then there was mr clive lockwood brill teacher made me captain of gymnastic team.woodwork once a week at victoria school great days for me and my pals alan pickering,kieth gardner.wally aveyard rings a bell.good times

Date:
03-Mar-2014

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Name:
maureen newton nee littlewood

Comment:
I went to brownhill, for 6 years left 1965 ,when became a primary only then went from there to the new high school primroshill which opened that year .sad to say that no longer is standing a new one was built.

Date:
17-Apr-2014

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Name:
Tony Green no1

Comment:
I went to Brownhill school I was the one that played bowls, Steve Palmer still have that photo of the woodwork class went on to be a joiner as did terry walker did live in bramley for many years but moved to garforth last year. And Tony green no2 as we where on the register you lived next to paper shop and had a sister called Barbara hope your ok . Brownhill was ok for me I have done ok in life

Date:
31-Dec-2014

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Name:
Phil Dixon

Comment:
I went to Brownhill from 1959 to 1965 passed my 13+ and went to Cross Green. I remember from the infants teachers as follows Mrs Tinker, Mrs Silverman, Mrs Wooster. From the senior school I remember the following teachers Miss Ashmore ( a student teacher called Mr Fox had the hots for her ), Messrs Garside, Addlestone and Lindley from the annex. Messrs Lockwood, Gates, Makram (a brilliant and intelegent Egyptian man), Exley, Pugh, Fulford and Heads Galanders and Senior. The pupils that spring to mind are Terry Eccles, Eric Greenwood, Alan Everall, Steve Hale, Paul Wolstainholme, Dave Fletcher, Billy Jameson, Steve McCoy, Ian Bramley, Andy Wooster John Brannan and many many more. It was a tough school, with tough, uncompramising teachers but we were tough kids and took all that was thrown at us. Great school, teachers and mates who went on to make a good life for themselves in spite of hard times.

Date:
05-Jan-2015

Email:
pdixon12@ntlworld.com

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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
Generally speaking, my earlier comments regarding my time at Brownhill CP School 52 to 57 have not been particularly complimentary, views I appear to share with at least two other earlier contributors namely, Paul Wood and Stuart Tordoff. It occurs to me that there must be many other contributing ex-pupils whom are wondering why that is/was. A fact I have observed in this regard, is that they were there somewhat later than we were, and things had become a little more behaviourally Liberal as far as the teaching ethos was concerned. I am 72 years of age now, and was thus able to compare my Son's 1970's/1980's schooling with my own, and am now viewing that currently been experienced by my two Grandchildren. Put quite simply, there is absolutely 'no comparison' betwixt there schooling, and mine. I've always claimed that my mother taught me more than Brownhill CP ever did, and the more I've thought about it over the years, the more reinforced that reasoning has become, although I must confess that she was rubbish at woodwork. I, on the other hand, have always been handy at DIY woodwork thanks to the much maligned methods of the infamous Mr Duxbury whose off-site premises on Beckett Street served all the schools in Harehill's and Burmantofts. The point I'm trying to make here, is that Primary education during the 1950's was very basic, and had more to do with discipline than academic achievement, hence the overly liberal application of corporal punishment meted out ... the receiving of which you dearly hoped your parents didn't find out about for fear of getting even more of it from them. Sounds barbaric doesn't it? And in a way, it was. The question is why was it the norm back then..?? And I have finally discovered the answer to that question thanks to a television programme, and a contributor to this photo named 'Alan Pugh' whose father was one of my teachers. Mr Pugh, who I remember as the Art Master over in the reservoir annexes, and the Master at whose table I sat at school dinners. He was - on the one hand, formidable, but on the other, he was erudite and full of humour. A tall chap with a dark moustache, who always wore a rust coloured sports jacket, and who spoke with a strong Welsh accent that he made much of, often as a joke. He was the only master who would gleefully tell you that his name was Dia, Welsh for David. His Son's comment about his Dad having spent WW2 as an RAF Pilot shot down at sea, came as a revelation to me. I thus looked further into this, and it became apparent that many of our ex-RAF war heroes had been encouraged to become school teachers. I have to say, I cannot recall Mr Pugh ever mentioning his wartime activity, which one might consider was to his credit. So easily can I now imagine and visualise 'Ft.Lt.Dia (Boy'o) Pugh' standing proudly in his RAF Blues. I don't recall if he did anything to advance me in any way, but that I can remember him so vividly, must mean something, doesn't it? But harping back to the level of my own education at Brownhill CP, even now I have difficulty with the current political discourse regarding the UK's apparent illiteracy in Mathematics. I can truthfully say, that until I'd left school aged fifteen, and had to go to night school for my job as a television engineer, I'd never before heard the words 'mathematics or maths' uttered. But I was very good at 'arithmetic' ... whom today could calculate square roots with only pencil and paper? I could, and thanks to my long late mother, I am still a stickler for the correct use of English - spelling, punctuation, etc. but I still failed the then social experiment known as the 11+.

Date:
01-Jun-2015

Email:
barry.hallam2@ntlworld.com

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Name:
Rob Young

Comment:
I was at Brownhill CP from 1953 to 1960. I can remember the Junior School Headmistress, a Miss Hawksworth. Also, a Miss Tinker, Mrs Perrin, Mrs Silverman & Mrs Heath. Ronnie Hilton’s daughter, Geraldine (Hill) was there at the same time. Recall Denise Clough, John Goldman & Christopher Mitten. In the hall was a massive wooden climbing frame which would probably be banned under current H & S rules. In the Senior School, I can also recall Mr Madeley who would hurl abuse at us, calling us cretins & imbeciles, along with Mr Garside, Mr Whitehead, and a Mr Quate. I too, was in the annexe on Harehills Lane. Anybody remember the “tuck” shop opposite, Appleby’s I think, & the Fish & Chip shop somewhere nearby (Mayfields?).

Date:
04-Jun-2015

Email:
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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
Whilst in my previous comment (essay), I proclaimed myself as a stickler for the correct use of written English - spelling, punctuation, etc. I omitted to include the equally important use of 'grammar'. That in itself was an error on my part, but then to find at-least 'two' grammatical errors in my comment, leaves me little option than to come clean and submit myself to Mr. Broster whom I'm sure had a daily quota of 'frayed-end' bamboo floggings to maintain. So any pedants out there who spotted my 'there/their', and 'been/being' errors, please accept my self admonishment in this regard. But get this ... against another Leodis photo, of - not Brownhill - but a different school altogether, a lady commenter refers to, "That lovely Mr. Broster." Thus the saying must be true, 'beauty' clearly did lay in the 'eye of the beholder'. I suppose I must have been looking in the other direction at the time. But never mind, eh? They 'were' the good old days, weren't they?

Date:
04-Jun-2015

Email:
barry.hallam2@ntlworld.com

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Name:
J. Tebbs

Comment:
I was told, while a pupil at Brownhill that no one excelled at every subject. I was, to use the parlance of those far off days, a dunce at arithmetic and even now have difficulty with some types of "sums". Needless to say I avoided any occupation which required the use of figures. I have always been of the opinion that if you can read and write the world, especially with regards to reading, opens up for you. I also think it's worth recalling that in those years following the Second World War, class sizes were often up to 55 pupils sometimes more and not many of them came with wings sprouting from their backs. I will though always be grateful to the Leeds school system of that time for taking us to the Town Hall to listen to the YSO play classical music, marvellous for me, but not unfortunately for everyone.

Date:
14-Jun-2015

Email:
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Name:
Patricia Holmes Nee (McNamara)

Comment:
I went to Brownhill 1953-1964 I remember Miss Hawksworth the headmistress in the infants and my first teacher there was Mrs Drake we use to have a table cloth on the tables when we had our milk and we use to have a nap in the afternoon. When we went to the big school next door the teachers I can remember are Miss Nunn,Miss Turton,Mrs Sharp,Miss Craib.MissEbben,Mrs Lawn and Miss Baldwn.

Date:
03-Jul-2015

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Name:
graham sadler

Comment:
Ah! there's Rocky's fight, sorry night club in the centre of the photo, just in front of the tall chimney.When folks were ordering 'Stowells of Chelsea' wine by the pint,you knew to keep your head low

Date:
27-Jul-2015

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Name:
Norma Spink

Comment:
Although not at all familiar with Harehills and surrounding districts, I have been looking and reading comments regarding Brownhill School and felt compelled to add my own comment. I went to school in the Burley area, infants and Sec.Mod. Finishing school in 1951! It all sounds familiar, teachers remembered good and bad, mostly good in my time. From going to concerts at the Town Hall, down to the awful experience of dentists, even the size of the classes, after the war. I always though I imagined the large classes until I saw one person commented on that. My three adult children have all been very clever, different education and all that. But I maintain that in my day we were given a good all round education on all things. Dentists.....I like everyone else still stress out if there is a visit to the dentist coming up. As one other commented, they were the good old days our grandparents kept telling us about. By the way, does anyone remember a pub in Beckett Street, can't rememer the name but a family call Oriell ran it. I would be interested, it is- was an unusual name and I was a friend of the daughter Nancy!

Date:
03-Jan-2016

Email:
norma132928@hotmail.com

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Name:
c. clark

Comment:
where were the children of Brownhills evacuated back in ww2?

Date:
19-Jan-2016

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Lisa Tennant

Comment:
My Nan worked at Burton's in the early 1960's. Her name was Joyce Tennant, her brother Brian Tennant also worked there. I am looking for someone who may of known her and was good friends with her.

Date:
12-Feb-2016

Email:
Lisa_1982_Pass@yahoo.co.uk

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Name:
Robert Tyers

Comment:
I started at brownhill school 1969 untill shakespear middle opened,I can remember Carol Massey,who lived on strathmore view,Terance Sharp,Gerald buttler,and a teatcher called miss Tootall. I lived at 12-14 strathmore drive my Dad had a shop called Jack Tyers, for a time he sold batteries and did repair's to tv's,and anything electrical,but later the shop became a offlicence and VG store(small scale). out of school my best mate was Andrew Feehan, great times when life was simple. I miss playing wally against Robinsons newsagent's side wall and footy in the back cobbled streets, jumpers for goal posts !!!

Date:
30-Mar-2016

Email:
btyers@plastechwindows.com

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Name:
Kathleen Healy

Comment:
Tony Green No1 Were you Friends with Micheal Hebden?

Date:
29-Jun-2016

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Shevill Mathers Esq

Comment:
I went to Brownhill school as my last school late '49 till 1953. I have a notion that I was first at Beckett Street-- I remember the big iron railings being removed for the war effort, and some of the old unused tram lines. I also recall running screaming out of the school dentists near the Shaftsbury Cinema?. can still see the down of chairs with victims mouths open being 'held still'I am now 79 and that image is as clear as day.Left the UK for Tasmania back in 1968 and have had a wonderful life and career, thanks to Leeds University Institute of Pathology. Link to an old image of the school: https://scontent.fsyd4-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/16508633_1376665479075173_7094455282492152664_n.jpg?oh=f018fa35d421efa48df7c001c39274c1&oe=592AA464

Date:
19-Feb-2017

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Paul Ogilvie

Comment:
I was at Brownhill School for a good 5 years I think before going onto Shakespeare Middle and then from 76-79 at Cross Green. I don't have many bad memories of going to Brownhill just the usual silly ones I think, pink custard, I got involved sticking Thunderbirds wallpaper to a type of 'model house' thing we could go in and out of. I do remember causing a major stir when me and a lad called David Popplwell played truant one afternoon in the big water pipes that were in the water board yard on Kimberley Road. My mam and dad wasn't pleased! Brought up in Wepener Place in the white houses where the people and real community spirit was way above the quality of the housing so being tough was part of day to day life and school was no different. For me schooling has maybe gone from one extreme to the other, I am sure Mr Makram wouldn't have taken the cheek and disrespect that's displayed to authoritive figures today! As with everyone's posts these are just my views and wouldn't change a thing.

Date:
11-Mar-2017

Email:
paul.ogilvie@ntlworld.com

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