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Kiddal Hall, Oriel Window

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Kiddal Hall, Oriel Window
Description:
10th August 1903, Around 1927 this oriel window was removed from Kiddal Hall. It is believed that the window was sold and taken to America. Research by by the Barwick In Elmet Historical Society and an appeal for information led to the discovery that the window had been bought by William Randolph Hearst with other fixtures from the Hall. They were not used, the exact whereabouts of these fittings is still to be found.

User Comments:

Name:
Roz Holland

Comment:
Do you know anything of the secret passage from Kiddal Hall which runs underground towards Jacobs Well? It was built as an escape route but it is still maintained today?

Email:
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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
During the period between the two World Wars, there was, shall we call it, a 'fashion' for wealthy Americans to buy old mansions and manor houses, (our English heritage) or parts of, demolish them and ship them, brick by brick over to the U.S.A.. On reaching their destination, they would be rebuilt in all their glory. There is a story that during this period, a very great tragedy was narrowly averted. It appears that an American millionaire was just about to complete the purchase of approximately two and a half miles of mediæval stonework, and ship it over to America, when someone in authority 'woke up' and stopped the deal going through - at the last minute, York City Walls were saved for posterity. Even though our heritage is much safer these days, the threat of its removal is still there. Look at 'The Queen Mary' and 'London Bridge', and all the other important treasures that we as a country have allowed to be auctioned off into foreign hands and lands. It seems that when our museums and art galleries are unable to raise the necessary funds, our governments are loathe to step in and help. It's strange that they can squander £billions per month on foreign wars and worthless bail-outs but yet can't afford to help their own people and their heritage. It seems that such things must be left to us, the public. We must always be on our guard!!!

Date:
10-Nov-2011

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Osmund Bullock

Comment:
Graham, the reason that others bought our 'heritage', especially at this time, was that we did not want it ourselves - you can see from the photograph that this fine oriel window was in poor condition, very possibly on the verge of collapse. If an owner was unable or unwilling to pay for very expensive conservation work, you can hardly blame the Americans for buying it - it was, after all, a voluntary sale for money. Interestingly, although we don't know where, it is probably still in existence: if it had stayed in situ it would quite possibly have been just demolished (as many, many thousands of old buildings in poor condition were in the early C20th). Things are much more strictly controlled now, but you could hardly expect the government to pay - then or now - for the preservation and retention of every one of hundreds of thousands of 'heritage' items, great & small, sad though it may be. And is it so terrible that some of this heritage thereby goes around the world to be enjoyed by others? As for John Rennie's 1831 London Bridge.....quite apart from the huge cost, where, exactly, would you have re-erected it? It had to be taken down because it was neither wide enough nor strong enough to cope with C20th traffic. You can't put a huge bridge in a museum, can you, however well they are funded?!

Date:
07-Feb-2012

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