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Rookwood Cresent no. 39, air raid shelter

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Rookwood Cresent no. 39, air raid shelter
Description:
1st July 1939. An Anderson type air raid shelter, erected in the garden of number 39 Rookwood Cresent. The rounded roof of the shelter is being covered with earth.

User Comments:

Name:
Don Smith

Comment:
If you had a garden this little shelter is where you would spend the night when there was an air raid in progress in the 1940s. It was cold, damp,and smelly, if you had no garden you would spend the night in the cellar under a steel table, then get off to school on time in the morning. me and my generation had six years of that I wonder how the 'whingers' of to day would have cope with those day's?

Date:
25-May-2010

Email:
anne-donsmith@shaw.ca

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Name:
Ron Davies

Comment:
The shelters on the Rookwoods on at least one occasion were put to the test. On the 7th November 1940, my mother in a letter to my father who was a patient in The Prince of Wales Hospital in Plymouth,writes, 'The sirens sounded at 6pm on Sunday and there was slight gunfire, but on Monday it was very heavy and the house shook.(the house in question being situated in Nowell Mount) There are still two unexploded bombs in the Rookwoods, one is 500lbs and sinking more each day, it has reached a depth of 44ft. Altogether nine bombs were dropped in the raid'.

Date:
07-Jun-2010

Email:
rondavies66@googlemail.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
In response to Don Smith's question. Not many! In any case you'd not be allowed to even enter an Anderson Shelter, let alone sleep in it. There'd be far too many HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES. People would have to stand outside and shout up at the bombers to tell them that they were infringing upon their human rights.

Date:
27-Sep-2010

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
brian hall

Comment:
i was born in february 1940 and we lived at no 42 rookwood cresent i can remember my mother taking myself and my two sisters into the air raid shelter on at least two occasions due to bombing raids

Date:
02-Nov-2010

Email:
mrhall2007@talktalk.net

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Name:
Len

Comment:
At least one of the bombs dropped on Rookwood Grove, I believe.

Date:
14-Oct-2011

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Sheila Jubb

Comment:
We had a Morrison Shelter, the steel table type. It was in our sitting room and my mother hated it. She had it in an alcove and put a frilled curtain around it to try to disguise it and was glad to see it go at the end of the war. I loved it, I played in it and was really sorry when it was taken away. My father said that we would have been grateful for it if we had been bombed.

Date:
19-Sep-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Barbara Oehm

Comment:
I was born in 1938 and can remember being taken into the Andersen air raid shelter when the siren went. I can also remember the dreadful wail of the siren and my mother saying "Thank God" at the sound of the "all clear". One night my father heard a plane overhead and got out of the shelter to have a look. I followed him up the path and I can still see his angry face in my mind's eye even now, when he realized I was there. He turned and said "GET BACK". He was in a reserved occupation so didn't go to war, but he joined the AFS to "do his bit" and I can still remember the sound of the buzzer waking him to go out on duty - and seeing him pulling on his navy serge trousers with braces that was part of the uniform. Yes...I wonder how the kids of today would cope with it....not only the visits to the air raid shelter and the accompanying fear, but the general deprivation of the time. This air raid shelter was close to where we lived on the Dunhill Estate, and only a couple of streets from my Grandmothers house.

Date:
23-Sep-2012

Email:
barbcarl@hinet.net.au

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