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Killingbeck Hospital, Aerial View

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Killingbeck Hospital, Aerial View
Description:
Undated, Aerial view of the Killingbeck Hospital site. Built as an isolation hospital it was used for the treatment of diseases such as tuberculosis. In the centre a block of wards built in a crescent shape, with beds on the verandahs can be seen. This was to give patients the maximum amount of air and sun, thught to be a good treatment for TB.

User Comments:

Name:
G Richardson

Comment:
I am working on the site of this hospital at the moment. All that is left is the ward on the left hand side (the one with the beds in the windows). Everything else is just piles of rubble.

Email:
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Name:
Alun Pugh

Comment:
When a student teacher in the early 1970s I worked here during many holidays as gardener,porter,stores etc. It was a fantastic place with its own community.We were at Temple Moor and Andrew Hewitts dad Arnold was the main man here.He got loads of us jobs.This in the days before the minimum wage so we were earning good money. Mr Hewitt was a super bloke.Pat Garside was the Head cook.What a guy .Still a friend of mine now[2007]

Email:
a.apugh@ntlworld.com

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Name:
michael mcguinness

Comment:
You can see the ward I was in with my brother,it was in the centre block about 3 or 4 windows from the right. We had scarlet fever,I can remember my mother coming to see us, we used to pass some string down to her because we were not allowed visitors, we were on the 2nd floor. This would have been about 194?.

Email:
michael_1938@live.co.uk

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Name:
t bowman

Comment:
my father stayed at this hospital for some 18 months after being diagnosed with TB following service in the marines during WWII

Email:
timmybowman@hotmail.com

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Name:
K Wall

Comment:
This is the sanatorium where my ggreat aunt stayed for a while in May 1915 as she had TB, she sent a photo/postcard to her eldest sister with her and the other patients sat in their beds on the verandah, two months later she died only 21years old.

Date:
27-Oct-2008

Email:
suiren@ymail.com

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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
Re Alun Pugh's comment...when I left Brownhill school (Harehills Lane) in 1957, two of the teachers were: Mr Pugh, and Mr Garside. Any relation? Regarding Killingbeck Hospital; In 1998 I was sent there by my doctor to be x-rayed for a pain in my shoulder. They diagnosed a collapsed lung and told me that they were going to stick a tube between my ribs and blow it back up. First I fainted, after which I made a bolt for their door. No, I wasn't a blacksmith, just a whimp. They put out an APB on me, but they didn't catch me. My doctor thought it was quite funny, but I didn't. After all, I'd only gone there to have my photograph taken.

Date:
29-Jun-2009

Email:
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Name:
Pobsy

Comment:
B Hallam I love your comments, I was in stitches (excuse the pun ha h). It Reminded me of the early 60'when my doctor sent me to the Leeds General Infirmary to have a small spot of hard skin removed from my toe that was irritating me when I walked. I woke up after the anaesthetic wore off, jumped out of bed to go put my clothes on, and collapsed in a heap on the floor, I told a nurse I was getting dressed to go home she said, you can't, you have just had your toe amputated??? In 1993 like you I suffered a collapsed lung, I was buried in a roof fall down a mine and suffered multible fractures, I was given an entonox mask and driven 18 miles to hospital by ambualance at 15 mph with a suspected spinal injury, The journey seemed to take forever. By the time I got to hospital and laid in a bed I was gasping for air and in excruciating agony, I looked up just in time to see a white clad figure rushing towards me with a long glass tube in his hand and without further ado he pressed his fingers on my chest and stabbed me! ulike you I was in no state to run away or I would have. Surprise... the result was instant ecstasy, my lungs filled up immediately and the pain from my multiple fractures became irrelevant, I will never fear the glass tube again.

Date:
27-Oct-2009

Email:
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Name:
alun pugh

Comment:
re B.Hallam.Yes that would have been my father who taught you at Brownhill.He died in 2001

Date:
29-Oct-2009

Email:
a.apugh@ntlworld.com

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Name:
sue

Comment:
my mother was in Killingbeck in approx. 1960. Her TB was very bad and although she lost some of her lung tissue, she survived (died in her late 70's) because of the wonderful doctors and staff there. I was saddened to learn it's now a retail outlet(s), but then these contagious diseases have, thank God, been mostly eradicated.

Date:
12-Dec-2015

Email:
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