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Arthington Viaduct and the River Wharfe

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Arthington Viaduct and the River Wharfe
Description:
Undated, Arthington viaduct spanning the River Wharfe in the early 1900s. Thomas Grainger built the viaduct in the 1840s. It has an impressive 21 segmental arches and sweeps across the river and valley on a 940.4 radius curve. Thomas Grainger had built railways all over Scotland and the North of England. Unfortunately after being a great advocate of railway safety he was himself killed in a train crash at the age of 57.

User Comments:

Name:
Pat Lazenby

Comment:
Thomas Grainger was the Engineer. Contractor James Bray. The foundation stone was laid on March 31st 1846 by Henry Cooper Marshall, Chairman of the Leeds and Thirsk Railway. "The quantity of stone used in the erection will exceed 50,000 tons." 21 arches each spanning 60 feet. Length of viaduct 1510 feet.

Date:
18-Aug-2009

Email:
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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
You have to admire the engineering and construction skills of the Victorians. Imagine what they might have done if they had had our technology. Each arch here is supported by approximately 2,381 tons of stone, and every foot of the way across is carried on approximately 33 tons. I wonder how many gallons of sweat flowed away down this river when this Victorian masterpiece was being built? Even in design, they had a flare that we cannot come anywhere near to these days. When it came to spanning a river or whole valley, they seem to have always had the landscape in mind. In a rural setting their structures blend in so perfectly, that in one sense you could say that they are are almost invisible, while still being 'in your face'. The modern-day architectural culture seems to have lost all feeling for the landscape in which it plants today's monstrosities. Take a look at a modern-day city skyline, which is really just a hotch-potch of individual designs, and then look at pictures of any city sky-line in the world, done in the 19th century and prior. Which would you prefer? - - - Be honest.

Date:
28-Sep-2009

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
S Johnson.

Comment:
Today the river looks different, but the viaduct hasn't changed.

Date:
19-Oct-2012

Email:
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