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The Malvern Cinema at the junction of Beeston Road and Ashley Place


The Malvern Cinema at the junction of Beeston Road and Ashley Place
Description:
9th July 1964, The front doors of the Malvern Cinema advertising some of the latest films. 'Nothing but the best', starring Alan Bates & Denholm Elliot in a comedy of murders released in 1964. The famous 'Zulu' again 1964 which starred Sir Stanley Baker and launched Sir Michael Caines acting career. 'Hell Driver's' Britains answer to a road movie also starring Sir Stanley Baker, Sean Connery & Sid James. There is a special children's show on Saturday at 2.00pm.

User Comments:

Name:
Stephen Birbeck

Comment:
I remember the hill being much steeper than this- probably when going home back up it after sitting through 2 films. My favourite Malvern stories are from my Grandparents who talked of getting in for a few pence AND getting a stick of rock into the bargain, though the best was my Grandma and great aunt when they were young beauties. A young man was sitting nexto them and offered a paper bag he was rustling. They were really excited thinking it was chocolates, when he said "Na then our lass, does thi want some broken biscuits then" !

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Name:
D.jempson

Comment:
we used to sneak in here also crescent pavilion, rex and beeston I dont think we ever paid.

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Name:
Les. Hinchcliffe

Comment:
Below the clock was neon lit and activated like a pendulum swinging

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Name:
Kieran Corscadden

Comment:
This was my local cinema in the early 1960's, where I would go with my older brother john, and watch such classics as 'The Big Country' and 'The Magnificent Seven'. I also went with my father and 2 of my older sisters in 1964 and saw 'A Hard Day's Night' - Fantastic !

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Name:
Gilly Fraser nee Emmett

Comment:
I lived in this place when a child in the late forties fifties, we lived in Coupland St.My Gran took me from being very small and we used to sit through the showings several times.It was for me a magic place. I became a screenwriter in later life and that is where it all started and it certainly taught me how films were constructed. I also went to the rex and the Crescent but this one was the bst, I can still smell the atmosphere in there and the thrill when the picture started. In those days I was always too impatient to read any credits, Life was too short and so many movies to see!

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Name:
Cliff Hayward

Comment:
On most Sunday evenings in 1948-49 I could be found in the passageway, second door from the left in the photograph, waiting for the doors to be opened. I can't be sure but I think this entrance was used only by advance ticket holders. There was a couple of girls of my about my own age who tended to be first in the queue. I enjoyed my Sunday evenings and saw some great films. Most of them are now shown on afternoon TV.

Email:
cliff@dorcliff17.demon.co.uk

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Name:
Jacqueline Whittaker nee Sharp

Comment:
I used to live on Tempest Road in the late 60s early 70s and this was our local pictures. I had a v short career here as a Saturday morining cleaner-my mate Karen Howson, who lived on Burlington Road but shared the same back street, worked here or her mum did, so I went along a couple of times but seeing it with the lights on and full of litter spolit the magic for me! Before that I used to regularly go with my brother Dennis and younger sister Susan to the Saturday morning matinees and be transported many miles away.

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Name:
ken Wharton

Comment:
My good friend Ray Stroud - the local DJ and Tony Blackburn sound-a-like - was a projectionist there in the early 1970's. I used to get in there for free on the odd occasion that he felt in a good mood. Bit of a "bug hutch" it was, nonetheless, a part of my life after I came out of the army.

Email:
ken_wharton@hotmail.com

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Name:
Keith Shepherd

Comment:
People of my era say one always remembers where you were when John Kennedy was assasinated. I can remember, it was at the Malvern. I do believe the Manager stopped the show to announce the news, or is my memory playing tricks. Cannot remember the film.

Email:
shepherdkr@aol.com

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Name:
janet

Comment:
i went with my sister deborah to the saturday morning kids shows and at the inerval a hoard of children would charge to the front to form a very long queue to get a ice cream from some poor woman

Date:
24-Jun-2009

Email:
janet.b1952@yahoo.co.uk

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
I have to support Gilly Fraser's comment here. Many people look back and refer to the old picture houses which they used to frequent as:- 'The Bug Hutch' - 'The Flea Pit', among other derogations. Half of the time, I don't think that they really mean it though. However, The Malvern, was, during the time that I knew it, (mid 1940's to early 1950's), regarded as a cut above quite a few of the many others in the surrounding, but far reaching area. I would think that for many, the local 'Picture Houses' are sadly missed. You always got two completely different programs each week, and when Sunday opening was finally allowed, you got three. And of course there were always the kids' morning or afternoon shows on a Saturday.

Date:
26-Sep-2009

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Kevin Thompson

Comment:
Fond memories of Saturday mornings, it was only five minutes walk down the hill from Cranbrook Ave where we lived

Date:
11-Feb-2010

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Name:
ken wharton

Comment:
I refer to Graham Schofield's comments about the use of the vernacular of the 50s and 60's; viz: 'bug hutch' etc. I think that he is probably right and at the time, it was a 'Palace' to us; it was the culmination of all our dreams and it set the scene for the re-enactment of whatever movie we had just gazed in awe at. Mind you, 'Sink The Bismarck' was a difficult one to re-enact. You're right, Graham, it is only with a nostalgic affection to that we use those terms which you quite correctly deprecate. Best wishes from Australia.

Date:
28-Jun-2010

Email:
ken_wharton@hotmail.com

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Name:
Dave Milbourne

Comment:
My uncle and aunt lived just behind the cinema, 1960's. I saw Bambi, Mary Poppins and Snow White here in the mid sixties. It was a place of excitment and awe. As a wide eyed youngster I don't ever think I saw it as a 'bug hut or flea pit'. The Rex cinema was also a fantastic place to be.

Date:
26-Nov-2010

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Name:
Garry Draper

Comment:
In the 60s I used to come here with my mates for the Saturday kids show, brilliant, afterwards we would gallop home on our imaginary horses slapping our backsides as we ran, I lived in Dewsbury Place opposite the Junction Pub so it was quite a way to gallop home. In 1964 I saw the film "Zulu" here with my Dad. Happy days and memories.

Date:
02-Mar-2012

Email:
garry52@talktalk.net

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Name:
Valerie Daniels

Comment:
I think my memory serves me right when I say when you entered the picture house from the entrance shown, you were at the front near to the screen and had to walk towards the people already seated. I always thought this was quite odd as I was used to going to the Rex and Crescent where you entered at the back.

Date:
15-Sep-2013

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to Valerie Daniels' comment:- Yes, the audience were able to see people entering or leaving via the doors at the left of the screen. However! There were two sets of doors, so even if it was quite late in the evening, and somewhere between early and late in the year, any outside light rarely intruded. I say that, as it must be remembered that those who were patrons in the 1940's, lived through the years of "Double Summertime". A system that was firmly in place during (and if my memory serves me), for some time after W.W.2. It has to be said that the system of people entering the auditorium was not all that distracting. After all, the audience, as in all cinemas, was sat in near-darkness, with their attention drawn to the excitements flickering on the silver screen. I have to agree with Valerie; it was unusual for entry to be from the front of a cinema. However, there was one venue that went even further. At The "Beeston Picture House" one could enter to the right of the screen as well as from the front of the building. One would access the expensive one shilling seats (5p.) via the pay-booth at the front of the cinema. For the cheaper 4d. and 7d. seats you went down a passage at the side of the building. At the end of which was another pay-booth, from where you entered at the front of the auditorium. There was always a thick long red rope which stretched across the two aisles in order to separate the cheap seats from the others. The following system was operated at The 'Beeston Picture House' during The War; I would imagine that there were other similar venues also:- Any child could get in for free ( I think when it was a matinee ), on the presentation of one (or was it two?) "Ministry of Food" jam jars. They had to have the M.O.F. logo on the bottom, otherwise they were not valid.

Date:
17-May-2014

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
GTallon

Comment:
Boy this brings back memories...Saturday Morning Matinee with a 6d bag of pineapple chunks. well worth the walk from Preston Parade - both ways!

Date:
14-Aug-2014

Email:
theloopsman@gmail.com

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Name:
Susan Richards

Comment:
I used to be a regular visitor to the Malvern to watch the afternoon shows. I distinctly remember watching Greyfriars Bobby there and crying all the way home. I lived in Charmouth Place which was at the bottom of Malvern Road . It would have been in the early sixties . The cinema was always packed , as was the crescent and the Rex cinema , both of which I went to as a teenager at night ,catching the bus in Dewsbury Road to get there. . Going to the pictures was a great night out and I had many dates in these establishments. Happy memories.

Date:
07-Oct-2014

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Name:
stephen oliver

Comment:
Having being born and bred in Beeston, and living in Sefton Street in the 1960's- 70, I'll never forget going to the Saturday matinee with my best mate Harry Clark, I couldn't wait to watch another episode of the Little Rascals. It was always a full house every Saturday morning. Happy Days.

Date:
21-Nov-2014

Email:
steveoliver66606@gmail.com

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Name:
joyce

Comment:
does anyone remember a girl called christine taylor who lived in malvern road, she had a sister and a dog called rusty in early sixties.we went to hillside school together.

Date:
31-Oct-2015

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Name:
Stephen Oliver

Comment:
I remember going to The Malvern but, living on Beeston Road, my local was The Beeston and my favourite was The Rex. I should point out that I am quite amazed that there is another contributor with the same name as me. Hope there won't be any confusion with any future comments.

Date:
23-Nov-2015

Email:
heck31770@aol.com

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Name:
Judith Boyes

Comment:
My husband Allen used to be a Part-time projectionist at the Malvern in the early 1960's. Our friend Tony Atkinson war the manager from that time until the cinema closed.

Date:
14-Feb-2018

Email:
judibelle@sky.com

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Name:
Mike Pawson

Comment:
This was my local cinema from the mid 1944 to '63, if it was an A film we used to stand outside asking adults if they would take us in, someone always did. Saw my first X film here, I think it was "The Thing" way before my 16th birthday, on this occasion I didn't ask anyone to take me in, but had quite a lengthy discussion at the pay box before they would issue my ticket.

Date:
03-Jul-2019

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