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Chesney View no.s 2-8

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Chesney View no.s 2-8
Description:
5th August 1964. Looking from Hillidge Place to Chesney View. On the left is number 8, there is a window box with flowers at the ground floor window. Moving right are 6, 4 and 2 on the right.

User Comments:

Name:
Mick Speke

Comment:
My nan Violet Thompson moved into No 2 Chesney View in the early 1960's after my Grandad died and she decided that her existing house (in Chesney Mount) was too big. For all I know the little lad on the trike could be me during a visit as I would have been 4 at the time. When we stayed we slept in the attick bedroom which, as it wa sthe end house was very cold. I too remember my nanhaving to regularly wash her curtains because of the steam trains and factory. What isn't clear from the photo is that there is a factory ( then Richmond Machine Tools - now Motorauctions). She moved out when the Chesneys were demolished (1966/67??)and we left the little bike in the cellar.

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Name:
Christopher Pankhurst

Comment:
2, Chesney View Hunslet Leeds. This house was occupied for a number of years by the family of George and Lavinia Swainston. At the 1901 census, when the family lived at 48, Turkey Street, there were 6 children in the family, aged from 18 years to 3 months: Sarah, Rhoda, Emily, Florence, Robert and Annie. A seventh, Louie, was born shortly after. By 1912 they had moved to Chesney View, as the marriage certificate of Rhoda (my grandmother) shows Chesney View as the place of residence at the time of the marriage. George Swainston is shown as an “Engine Maker (Fitter)” in the 1901 census. His wife, Lavinia, was the daughter of a “Foreman Potter (Earth)”, who had lived at 32 Leathley Road in Hunslet. My mother, also called Rhoda, was born in 1913 to Rhoda and Alfred Nicholson. She was orphaned in 1918, and went back to Chesney View to live with her grandparents. She remembered that the air was so dirty from the local factories that the curtains had to be washed once a week, and the water was black afterwards. After leaving school, she went to work in the Cooperative Tailoring factory, where she worked until she married, and left Chesney View. All of the 7 children did quite well in life, from very humble beginnings. With the exception of Florence (who married the son of the Chief Constable of Leeds, and Sarah, who was a spinster), the others married into relatively prosperous shop-keeping families in Leeds, and moved from Hunslet to such places as Horsforth and Headingley.

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Name:
Pat Dixon nee Oldridge

Comment:
I lived at no.8 Chesney View from a very young age probably about the year 1948 until the houses were compulsorily purchased in 1966,when we moved to Middleton's Westwood estate.My parents were Allan and Ethel Oldridge and I have a younger brother named Philip.At no.6 were a family called Bateman, the son was called Stanley and the daughter was called Maureen.At the bottom end of the street(out of picture) is the side wall of the Richmond machine tool company's engineering works(formerly called Midgeley&Sutcliffe).

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Name:
iws

Comment:
Lavinia Swainston nee Kavanagh was my great grandfathers Edwin Kavanagh sister.He worked as a forman potter in Leeds His father was also Edwin Kavanagh and mother Sarah Kavanagh nee Tordoff.Edwins father Thomas Kavanagh,occupation was cloth dresser as was his farthers occupation his father was John Kavanagh from Ireland.

Date:
25-Sep-2009

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Name:
Moira Waring nee Thompson

Comment:
My mum Violet Thompson moved from Chesney Mount which was a double fronted house, large kitchen, sitting rooom, two double bedrooms, two attics, one containing a bath, into a scullery house in en my Dad died. The house in Chesney View was very cold as it was on the top of the street, next to the yard and next to the factory. When we stayed there we had to sleep in the attic, it was miserable and cold. When they were compulsorily purchased she moved to Belle Isle. She was unhappy there and bought a small house in Cross Flatts where she was very happy. In later life I became the Managing Director's secretary of the company at the back of Chesney View, Richmond Machine Tools. I worked for Ken Hatton. Norman Benson, whose mother had The Garden Gate, was Sales Director and Mr Swift was Financial Director.

Date:
16-Jun-2012

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Name:
Peter Brooks

Comment:
My mum, Joan Hattersley, was brought up at 9 Chesney View and subsequently at 7 Chesney View after my grandma, Edith Hattersley, moved next door (never did know why - it was before I was born in 1951). I was brought up in Manchester and Lancashire so I was only ever a visitor to Chesney View, but my memories of it are vivid (and possibly inaccurate). No 7 was a corner house with a street lamp outside; my brother and I slept in the attic, which had a window at the top of the stairs, and we heard the conversations of everybody who passed beneath the street lamp late at night. I remember the factory. behind an incredibly high wall at the top of the street. I remember the scullery with only a cold water tap and a tin bath hanging on the wall. The bath was filled from a kettle which my grandma heated on the firegrate. The cellar was whitewashed and remarkably clean, especially considering the coal cellar was in almost daily use. The lavatory, behind the midden halfway up the street, was also kept remarkably clean, despite the number of users and the soot from all the candles they had to carry in winter. I remember leaning over the railway bridge that separated the Chesneys from Hunslet Moor and getting a face full of steam whenever a train passed underneath. I also remember walking across the parapet on the bridge when we were certain that our grandma wasn't around to see us. Opposite 7 Chesney View was a hardware store with a distinctive smell of brushes and bundles of firewood wound with wire. Years later I walked into a similar store in a back street in Nelson, in Lancashire, and was immediately transported by the smell back to Chesney View. Also years later I fell into conversation with the writer Keith Waterhouse in a pub in London. Apparently he was brought up in or around Hunslet and remembered the Chesneys well. My grandma died in 1964; my mum died about four years ago. I see from other postings on this site that the Chesneys died in 1966. I suppose, with the benefit of hindsight, they were slums; but somehow it still seems a shame that they had to go.

Date:
15-Jun-2016

Email:
peter.brooks28@hotmail.com

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