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Melville Street nos. 1 - 7


Melville Street nos. 1 - 7
Description:
24th August 1965 View looks along odd numbered back-to-back houses on Melville Street, towards Speedwell Street where part of an off licence can be seen on the left edge. Numbers on Melville Street run from 1 to 7 left to right with an outside toilet block seen on the right edge. The rest of the properties on the odd numbered side went through to Melville Row. Suffragette Mary Gawthorpe was born at 5 Melville Street in 1881. Her blue plaque reads- 'Mary Gawthorpe, socialist and suffragette. Born in Woodhouse she struggled to achieve financial independence as a school teacher. Inspired by Christabel Pankhurst, she was imprisoned in Holloway for her protests at the House of Commons and elsewhere. She was a Women's Social and Political Union organiser and sat on its national committee. 1881-1973

User Comments:

Name:
Paul Atkinson

Comment:
Number 5 was the birthplace in 1881 of the noted women's suffrage campaigner Mary Gawthorpe. her autobiography Up Hill to Holloway (Penobscot, Maine, 1962) describes her childhood here and mentions the closets shown in the picture. Each was shared by two families: earth closets at first and later trough water closets. It's great to have a photo to connect with these details.

Date:
05-Nov-2008

Email:
hispa@leeds.ac.uk

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Name:
dot smith

Comment:
My auntie Eve Armstrong lived at number 7 the 4th one up in the picture. I remember as a child there was an old lady that lived there they called her Mrs Kitchimer, she used to wear a white old fashioned mock cap and she had the old fashioned black leaded fire range, just like my grandma had. Come to think of it as a child we had the same! Then we went a bit up market we got a tiled fire place with an electric fire with 3 bars on it. No more making paper chips or chopping fire wood in the cellar or going down the hollow to buy coal bricks when we had run out of coal. On a Sunday it used to be my turn to start the fire I would make the paper chips, this consisted of rolling newspaper and then tying it in a knot. I then had to light the chips, put the shovel on the coal grate and draw the fire with a sheet of news paper. You had to be quick otherwise the paper would catch fire and you would have to start all over again. Or you would burn your fingers. But luckily Sunday was a treat day, a bacon sandwich for breakfast and a hot Sunday dinner for lunch. (Fry up on a Monday)

Date:
07-Mar-2009

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
dot smith

Comment:
Please add my email address d.nutter@hotmail.co.uk

Date:
05-Jul-2015

Email:
Not displayed

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