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Beckett Street nos. 94 - 102

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Beckett Street nos. 94 - 102
Description:
Undated, Image shows a parade of shops on Beckett Street. On the far left at number 102 is the Elliot fisheries with Gallons Ltd, grocers at number 100 on the right. In the centre at number 98 is W. Bradshaw electrical store with the L & S Lowes drapery store on the right at number 96. On the far right at number 94 is the H & H Colley newsagents selling cigarettes, confectionery and some groceries.

User Comments:

Name:
susan peel

Comment:
I knew the drapers as Lily Baileys. She had wool stored from floor to ceiling all around the shop.

Email:
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Name:
Steven Wood

Comment:
I believe that my dad Keith Wood was born at number 94 in 1935,when my grandma and granddad ran it as a sweet shop.

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Name:
Susan Peel (nee Farrar)

Comment:
This were my local shops in the 1950s. As a child my favourite shop was the sweet shop I knew as Robinsons.

Email:
peelsus@aol.com

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Name:
Paul Wood

Comment:
I remember Lilly Bailey's really well.She had everything in haberdashery that you could possibly think of.Susan Peel was not exaggerating about the stuff piled up.She had shelves stuffed with boxes all the way to the ceiling and used a tall ladder to get to the top shelves.She had no labelling system that I remember,but after a moment's thought she seemed able to locate by instinct everything requested no matter how obscure.An amazing woman. She later moved to a shop on the corner of Stoney Rock Lane and Fraser Street which was previously a sweet shop run by the Marsden family.This was in the early sixties when the shop on Beckett Street was demolished.

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Name:
Paul Wood

Comment:
Gallons store brings back many memories from the mid 50's.My Mother used to buy cheese and bacon from the store regularly.I remember the man who worked there.He wore a clean white work coat and was always smiling and friendly.He would cut the block of cheese with a wire with great precision and I recall the big bacon slicer going back and forth.Whenever I hear the expression "grinning like a Cheshire cat" I always envision this man smiling and cutting a large block of Cheshire cheese with his wire cutter.Funny how things like that stick in your mind over 50 years later.

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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
Paul Wood... well said ole man! Your memories of Lillie Baily's shop are dead right, she was truly amazing. You could hardly get in the door for the mass of stock crammed into that little space. How she found any thing, was a mystery. Knitting was a big deal in the fifties, but wool could be expensive. She would lend out knitting-patterns, get the total requirement of the particular wool, put the customer's name on it, and then let them buy it a skein at a time.

Email:
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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
Following on from 'Lillie Bailey's, Paul's comments on Gallons are equally nostalgic. Not only was cheese and bacon cut and wrapped before your eyes, so was butter, sugar, and flour. They came in barrels. Watching a scoup of butter being patted into a perfect block, then being expertly wrapped in greasproof paper, was a sight to behold. Sugar was always put into a blue paper-bag. Most people ran what was known as a 'book'... a little red book. The purchses - without payment, throughout the week, were listed. At the weekend, the 'book' would be 'made-up' - added-up, and paid for. Then - next week, you started again. This was how we lived in the 40's and 50's. Gallons - along with: Thrift, and The Co-op, were shops that one had to be registered with during, and for long after, World War II. This was because basic food was rationed requiring coupons to obtain. Hence the oddities of butter, and sugar, etc. These 'provisions' that they were then known-as, would often be rationed in tiny amounts such 2oz (ounces). These days, my late wife would have put that much butter on a scone.!!

Email:
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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
By the way Paul, the man in Gallons was Mr Knapton. Because my Dad worked for a local business man who knew all the other traders, so did my Dad. I was often sent to the 'back-door' of certain shops with a note... shush, shush, know what I mean?

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Name:
Linda Harrison/nee Bates

Comment:
Two of my grandads brothers had shops on this parade Charlie Wood had the fishmongers and Jim Wood had the greengrocers, my grandad was Harry Wood and we lived in Stoney Rock Lane

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Name:
brian thomas

Comment:
Gallons head office and distribution warehouse was on Ingram Road Holbeck close to the school I attended. Did Thrift stores buy them ? Gallons employed many part time schoolboy workers delivering groceries on custom made bikes with basket carriers.I was one of these 10 bob a week plus tips (1954/55) (2hours per night and Sat mornings

Date:
16-Mar-2010

Email:
helensdad@mac.com

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Name:
Elizabeth Forbes nee Rose

Comment:
Happy memories reading the comments Lily Baiely's shop was a treasure trove, I remember my mother buying wool a ball at a time and putting the rest waway, how she ever remembered where things were, no matter how obscure the item she knew exactly where it was. Gallons store holds many happy memories of watching the biutter being patted into a block and the sugar in the blue paper. Does anyone remember the biscuits in the huge tin boxes and getting them weighed out. I remember as a child a great gale and the roof getting blown off many of the shops. I lived in Alma Street and remember watching workmen trying to pull huge tarpaulin sheets over the roof tops till they could be repaired. I remember standing at the bottom of my street watching the shops being demolished what a sad day that was

Date:
05-Aug-2010

Email:
liz.forbes@ymail.com

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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
Continuing my comment on the photo of the shops lower down this parade, I reiterate that the Newsagents here at 94, wasn't listed as a shop. Whilst it may have been connected with commerse as a 'lock-up', it was only listed as the home of a 'Horse-keeper' named 'Mr Phipps'. The same goes for number 98 which was listed only as the two-room home of a family called 'Simpson'. Lily Bailey's at number 96, was listed as a 'Fancy Drapers' owned by Eliza Boyes. Exactly what number 100 was prior to its convertion to Gallons, it wasn't listed as a residence at all. But the real gem I found in the 1911 census was who owned the fish-shop seen here as 'Elliots' at 102. This was none other than 'Henry Robert Youngman' famed for his later Fish Restaurant on Briggate. Youngman's earlier fish shop was in Hunslet in the 1880's. He established his first City Centre shop on 'Lowerhead Row' in 1914 which became Eastgate in 1932, whence he moved to Briggate. Doubtless, Henry Robert would have been long gone, when on my very first day at work aged 15 in January 1958, I was sent to Youngman's for fish & chips x14. It went horribly wrong, and of-course, I got the blame. I would never again go to Youngman's fish shop.

Date:
16-Jun-2011

Email:
barry.hallam2@ntlworld.com

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Name:
Pauline Murray ( nee Colley)

Comment:
The shop at no 94 is my grandparents Harry & Hilda Colley. They later had a shop in Halton Moor.

Date:
29-Nov-2011

Email:
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Name:
Pauline Murray (nee Colley

Comment:
My great grandparents John and Dorothy (Robin) Robinson ran the sweet shop at no:94, it was then passed to his daughter and her husband Hilda and Harry Colley, they later ran a shop at Cartmell Drive.

Date:
01-Dec-2011

Email:
pipkin33@hotmail.com

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Name:
Don Smith

Comment:
Not like this now, no shop's in sight just like all the other redeveloped areas in Leeds,government want to get people out of there car's so they make us drive miles to shop, when there are no petol car's were will the government get the tax form to replace the lost revenue. ?

Date:
07-Sep-2017

Email:
anne-donsmith@shaw.ca

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