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Le Prince's single lens camera-projector, 1888, front view

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Le Prince
Description:
1888 Image shows the front view of the single lens camera-projector developed by Louis Le Prince in his workshop, next to Blenheim Chapel, at Number 160 Woodhouse Lane. The British patent was applied for on 10th January, 1888. The pattern and woodwork for the camera was made by local joiner, Frederick Mason of William Mason & Sons. J.W. Longley, a skilled mechanic built the machine and Le Prince was also assisted by his son, Adolph. The famous short sequence of moving film, showing traffic and pedestrians on Leeds Bridge, earned Le Prince the title of 'Father of Moving Pictures'. It was taken from the second storey window of Hicks Brothers at the south-east corner of the bridge. (Incidentally Hicks Brothers supplied Le Prince with ironmongery for his machines.) The pictures were taken at the rate of 20 frames per second and were shown projected on a screen in Le Prince's workshop at 160 Woodhouse Lane. Electricity was provided by a Robey steam engine in the yard of William Mason & Son at 150 Woodhouse Lane. This unique sequence of film appears on the home page of the Leodis website.

User Comments:

Name:
Kev Wilson

Comment:
Louis Le Prince lived at 16 Sholebrook Avenue, Chapeltown, and made a short film of his wife and children in the front garden. The house is one of only a few in Sholebrook Avenue left stood, and in use.

Email:
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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
It looks as if this machine had to be strapped down in order to stop it creeping. Note the metal loops anchored to the feet.

Date:
12-May-2009

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Simon Wyss

Comment:
That is exactly what bothers me. How would he have the camera attached to a support? Did he not use a tripod? The camera has four feet. There are more such details with this left-behind camera which make me think he purposely misleads posterity. For instance has he the film moved upwards while everybody else chose the other direction. Next, although speaking of perforation in the patent he would not employ any here. Then he places the optics between the shutter shaft and the main plate rather than on the other side. The shutter shaft is not directly connected to the main drive but indirectly via the excenter axle. No other camera is constructed so awkwardly. While this all could function it hasn't got any deeper sense. I believe Le Prince took the real thing with him to a hidden place. He was 49 years and 3 weeks old when he parted from his friends on September 13, 1890. We must not take for granted what his brother stated in Lyon. There is no evidence that they met. He might have continued his work, have it perfected over the years. He would have been 70 when the Bell & Howell Standard Cinematograph Camera got finished in 1911.

Date:
27-Jul-2010

Email:
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Name:
Simon Wyss

Comment:
I still think exactly the same way about it.

Date:
29-Oct-2012

Email:
simon-wyss@gmx.net

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