leodis logo

Leeds City Council

Open archives compliant site

Supported by BIG Lottery Fund

Enrich UK Lottery Fund

Cockburn High School, Burton Road


Cockburn High School, Burton Road
Description:
Undated. View of Cockburn High School in Burton Road. It was named after Sir George Cockburn, a former Chairman of Leeds School Board and an educationalist. The school opened on 17th July 1902.

User Comments:

Name:
kayleigh sykes

Comment:
i go to cockburn now and this is well weird seeing old cockburn. i also live near this but never realised what it was!

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton (nee Gatehouse)

Comment:
A lot of us passed through the doors of this grammar school. I was there between 1957 & 1964. The secondary modern school at the time was called 'Parkside' in Gypsy Lane which is where the comprehensive Cockburn now is. This older building was demolished because of asbestos, which is a shame because the architecture was so interesting.

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Crowther

Comment:
I was educated there from 1934 to 1940.Very good school, co-ed and fee- paying /scholarship.Remember most of the teachers esp Ronnie Scott(Maths ), Sammy Twist ( Geography) and Miss Bartle( English). Like to hear from anyone of that era.

Email:
jack_crowther@bridgeplayer.net

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Green

Comment:
I too have happy memories, 1937-42 at Cockburn. Evacuation to Knaresborough in 1939, overnight fire-watching in 1941 - the girls did the day-time week-end duty. I'm not sure about Jack Crowther's memory of the flamboyant pianist, organist and maths teacher G R Scott - I thought that he was George. He was our form master in my first, and possibly second year

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
The playground area around this part of of the building, was for the girls. Somewhere, halfway down the yard, on the left, there was a barrier, (a wall, topped with railings, I think it was. Perhaps someone can confirm this?)which separated the sexes at play. If my memory serves me correctly the girls' entrance was in the facade that can be seen here in a line just behind the gas-lamp. The school must have been regarded as a very innovated building when it was built, having as it did, a warm-air heating system. Warm air was circulated into the classrooms via ducts that were built into the walls. Again, memory fails. I can't be sure whether the system worked or not when I was there.

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
Yes, the girls' entrance was at the front of the building as Graham Schofield says, and the boys' at the back. And the segregated playgrounds were certainly separated by a wall, although I don't think the railings were there in my day. The large basement gymnasium was a striking feature and this was often used as a venue for theatrical productions such as the Gilbert & Sullivan operettas.

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
JIM.S (leeds)

Comment:
Gosh! I remember going all the way from Cross Flatts Park School just to see my girlfriend, Andrea Verity who attended this high school (Her father was a butcher opp ‘Tommy Wass’ pub, top of Dewsbury Rd. Those were the good old days!

Email:
zar.zar@ntlworld.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
anthony yuille

Comment:
i was educated here from 1958-65 and loved it. I was made head boy under the then head Mr T.E.N Starbuck. One of the privileges was to enter the school by the main entrance just around the corner which had the war memorial plaque just inside the entrance on the left. There always seemed to be fresh flowers whenever I entered, The gym downstairs was always where we held the christmas dances. On one occasion I even got to dance with the head's daughter whose name escapes me. A great place to be educated which set me up for life. Hence the school motto 'non scholae sed vitae'

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Mick Pollard

Comment:
I attended from 1961-1966.When i tell people the teachers wore mortar boards and gowns,they don"t believe me (they did honest!)Also everyone stood up when a teacher entered the classroom and waited to be told to "sit".I have many fond memories.

Email:
michael.pollard17@btinternet.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Steve Webster

Comment:
Yes, I loved Cockburn too - I went from 1966-73. That's definitely the girl's side, the boy's playground (opposite Burton House, where we had music lessons) was much bigger. The teachers did wear gowns and mortars, especially Mr Smith the RE teacher, and TEN Starbuck was still the headmaster when I was there. Happy days!

Email:
s.webster@btinternet.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Frances Hainsworth (nee West)

Comment:
Happy days? Well yes some of them were, but not Latin with Mr. Taylor!!!Maths was ok with the lovely Bill (Rhodes) and do any of you remember the very gorgeous Mr. Granville who also taught Maths, but not for long. I was there from Sept 1960 until Summer 1967. I remember the staff wearing gowns but not mortar boards, not even at Speech Day.

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Stuart Bailey

Comment:
My Mother Marie Oldroyd went there in 1929 after winning a scholorship and to this day speaks well of her time there.

Email:
bailey.stuart@tiscali.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Steve Smith

Comment:
Must agree with Frances - I went to Cokburn from 1959 to 1966 and whilst most staff wore acedemic gowns, complete with University Colours at Speech Day each year down at Leeds Town Hall, I never remeber anyone wearing a mortor board. The Plenum Heating system was a great innovation in it's day, people came from all over to see it when it was installed, but it proved to be the building's undoing when it helped riddle the building with asbestos. The sytem had huge fans in the basement which drew in cold air and pushed it along the full length of the basement corridor which was lined with large bore heating pipes which heated the air. It was then filtered and blown around the building through brick 'tunnels' about 2 ft wide and 1 foot high. The warmed air emerged at the back of each classroom through 4 or 5 grills just above head height at the back of each room. In December 1984 the Council closed the school for a few days to remove asbestos round a boiler and pipes in a room off the basement corridors. The seals used by the workmen proved to be inadequate and asbestos got out into these basement corridors and was carried all round the building. I only found out the details of how it worked as I had returned in 1974 to teach at Cockburn and was involved as a staff representative in the negotiations over the school's future. They could have cleaned the building but the costs were less than refurbishing the old Parkside buildings which were just about to be taken out of use and the school was to transfer to become Middleton Park High. We bussed the pupils every day for 18 months across the city to the closing Moor Grange High buildings near Lawnswood School. When I returned as a Teacher in 1974 the gym had been converted into 2 Woodwork rooms and the old Woodwork room had become a 2nd Biology Lab. The old Metalwork room which stood alongside the gym/Woodwork rooms had been transferred to a room under the old Biology lab. I eventually retired after spending 7 years as a pupil and nearly 30 years as a Teacher at Cockburn

Date:
03-Nov-2008

Email:
stephen.smith2017@ntlworld.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Brian Horsley

Comment:
Nice to see a photo of Cockburn attended here 1959-84 interesting about the Heating system in an earlier comment , the centre of the school had white tiles to reflect light to Gymnasium and inside corridors . My brother tells me Mr Newton (Bob) Art & Woodwork died just before Christmas he lived behind us and if I had homework problems it was over the back fence , it was a well worn path Jan 09

Date:
12-Jan-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Jean Armitage (nee Fisher)

Comment:
Re. the comments about the playground - do you remember the outside toilets which were in the side yard? I think the boys still used them when I was there (1959 to 1966) but not the girls, unless you were desperate!! I too remember the gymnasium, used for Gilbert & Sullivan productions, having taken part in two of them. The first was The Mikado, produced by TEN Starbuck (by the way, Tony, if you read this, his daughter was called Anna)and the second was The Gondoliers, produced by Stuart Bennett. He thought it would be a good idea to have an innovative entrance for one of my scenes, and he persuaded Josephine (Philipps I think was her second name) to bring her pony to a rehearsal during half term. I'm afraid the idea came to nothing as Josephine couldn't persuade the pony to go down the stairs into the gym!! I breathed a huge sigh of relief, I don't think I would have dared get on it even if she had got it down the steps.

Date:
14-Jan-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Ann (Walker)

Comment:
I won a scholarship from Hunslet Carr and was at Cockburn from 1951 to 1956. All the teachers wore gowns and on speech day also their mortar boards. The boys yard was seperated from the girls by a low wall, I well remember as I was told off for having a snowball fight one playtime across the wall, the reason being I might have got hurt. Lots of good teachers Miss French, who taught french, the dreaded H. Thompson who taught Enlish Lit. and I remember the headmistress at that time was a Miss Dedicoat. I still have my school report from Cockburn it is in the form of an A4 booklet which was signed by a parent at the end of term,returned and retained by the school until the following term. I well remember a music teacher by the name of Mr Eades,I joined the school choir,remember singing in the Town Hall and auditioning for H.M.S. Pinafore. Thanks for the photo and the memories.

Date:
19-Jan-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
anthonyyuille@hotmail.com

Comment:
Thanks very much Jean re the info on Mr Starbuck's daughter.Somewhere along the line of dramatic productions made at the school my german teacher Terry Hawkins was often heavily involved. I don't know how long he stayed at Cockburn but I do know he published much of the material he used to good effect in his lessons and which is still for sale/use today. I know because I teach german still. An inspirational teacher.( if you read this Mr T. thanks!)

Date:
25-Jan-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Beryl Cook (Now Beryl Walker)

Comment:
I attended Cockburn High School from 1948 to 1953. I believe the education I received there was the best thing that ever happened to me. Now in my seventies and retired, I look back on a full life, with a very successful career in education, as teacher, lecturer, adviser, inspector and lead inspector. I am still very active, have many interests and am involved in many hobbies and activities. I came from a very large family and was the only one of our family of nine children priviledged to have a grammar school education. I passed the 11 plus from Hunslet National School. Cockburn's teachers helped me to realise that I had a brain and that I could use it. They were happy days, even though the uniform was only possible because of grants (I found this embarrassing when we shopped for it using the vouchers), and free dinners were provided, also embarrassing if anyone made this known to the other pupils. I'm wise enough now to realise that these things matter very little - what was important was the chance to have a good education. My best memories are the singing at Speech Days, the 50th anniversary event in the Town Hall, watching the Coronation on the school's new televion set. I loved the geography lessons (Miss Crowther), the English Lessons (Miss Mills) and the art lessons (Mr. Cubitt, later followed by Mr. Newton). I recently found four classmates on Friends Reunited. We met up for a memorable day, having not seen one another for 53 years! We all still have our reports and photographs, and we thoroughly enjoyed reviewing our school days and sharing our life stories.

Date:
22-Feb-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Frances Hainsworth nee West

Comment:
Does anybody remember Mr Nettleship who taught Chemistry? Apparently he was J.K. Rowling's inspiration for one of the 'baddies' in the Harry Potter books!!! Seems about right!

Date:
07-Apr-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Ann Harrison (nee Jackson)

Comment:
Yes, Frances, I remember Mr Nettleship, whom we very daringly referred to as Mr Battleship. To show the structure of complex molecules he would use cocktail sticks and small jelly sweets. Needless to say these structures rarely lasted for more than one lesson.

Date:
30-Apr-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Malcolm Wright

Comment:
Like Frances Hainsworth, I grimly recall Mr Taylor's Latin lessons - a double period on Wednesdays, with occasional relief when the fragrant Miss Milner (also English)deputised. Though put off Latin for 50+ years, I came back to it recently, with an inspirational teacher at evening classes and, like all converts, now preach its virtues to my grandkids at every opportunity! Does anyone remember dear old Freddie Moss (French and German)? After Assembly, he would adjust his pince-nez and, gown billowing, sail the full length of the corridor, key held at the optimum level to ensure its marrying exactly with the keyhole; I never saw him miss!

Date:
05-Jul-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton (nee Gatehouse)

Comment:
How sad to hear of Bob Newton's demise (Brian Horsley's comment). He taught me Art for seven years at Cockburn and I remember doing the scenery for 'The Mikado' under his direction. I also remember the very first art lesson I had with him, where his initial opening words were: "Art is the expression of your own ideas in any medium". I liked his very down-to-earth manner and slightly cynical style - a somewhat unusual character in that environment.

Date:
05-Jul-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to Beryl Cook's comment. I was there from 1949 to 1955, but I don't recall an english teacher by the name of Mills. Although I do remember a rather attractive woman called Miss Milner who taught english all through my time there. Also, with reference to Brian Horsley's comment. Bob Newton was there during my time, but I never knew him to take wood-work. That task fell to a great guy called Brennan. Sad to hear about Bob Newton passing away last year though. I saw him only a couple of years back. He turned up at a 5th form re-union for my year, which was held at 'The Broadway' on Dewsbury Road.

Date:
06-Jul-2009

Email:
GrahamScho@aol.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton (nee Gatehouse)

Comment:
I would query the comment by Frances Hainsworth about Mr Nettleship being the inspiration for J. K. Rowling's character 'Snape'. I read the media article about a Mr Nettleship who taught her in the 70s in a school in Monmouthshire - there was also a picture which didn't seem to resemble the teacher that I remembered. It is possible that he moved, of course. But I have vivid memories of the Cockburn Mr Nettleship - he came as a trainee teacher and was totally unable to control the class - he was lovely, shy and blushed furiously when addressed - those early classes were a complete shambles and another teacher would sometimes be brought in to calm things. During his time as a proper teacher he matured and, as an arts student in the Sixth Form (1962/4), I remember having him for General Studies where he introduced us to some interesting stuff on the history and philosophy of science like the 'Big Bang Theory' - those interests have remained with me ever since. If indeed he was the inspiration for 'Snape', I am somewhat puzzled and think that he must have undergone a 'Voldemort' kind of metamorphosis over the years! Perhaps Stephen Smith (whose comments appear here) could enlighten us as to whether Mr Nettleship moved to the Wye valley in the 70's?

Date:
08-Jul-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Peter Jackson

Comment:
Does anyone know if the BBCs first "Weather Girl" Barbara Edwards went to this school circa approx 1946.

Date:
09-Jul-2009

Email:
petermj67@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Just to add to various comments. I was there 1949 to 1954, and I remember that not all the teachers wore 'gowns' during the working day, although most did for Assembly. The headmaster at that time was a Mr. Sutcliffe. He always wore a gown, as did Miss Deadicote, the girls' Headmistress. The only other teacher that I can remember always wearing one through the day was a Mr. Moss, who taught Languages. As I understood, he could speak several languages fluently. However, he only ever took our class for Scripture. I remembering him always wearing gold rimmed pince-nez glasses. Time dulls the memory, and I cannot recall all the teachers' names from my time. Do any of you remember, Miss Adams (Geography), Messrs. Parker and Thompson (Physics), Mr. Brennan (Woodwork), Miss Milner (English), Miss Hodgson (Mathematics), Mr. Currie (English), Mr. Shackleton (English?), Mr. Welbourne ( ? ), Mr.Chell (French), Mr. Rockliffe (German). He had also been an interpreter during the Second World War. Our music teacher was a little guy called Mr Eaddie (pronounced Eeeddie). As far as I can remember, the teaching of English was split into Grammar and Literature, and I seem to remember that we had different teachers for both subjects. We had a rather good teacher for Literature, called Mr. Carter. He was also an athlete, having run at The White City.This leads me on to mention the guy who took us for P.T and Games - Les Williams. Les deserves a mention as there was much more to him than any of us really knew. We all knew that as well as teaching at Cockburn, he also played for Hunslet. But what I, and probably everyone else didn't know, was that he was the star at Cardiff Arms Park, scoring two tries in the game when Wales had their first win over England after the War in 1949. Shortly after that he signed up with Hunslet, thus changing from Rugby Union to Rugby League. During the War Les was a Petty Officer, and played for The Royal Navy, as well as The Combined Services. After the War he joined The Scarlets at Llanelli, where he became the club's leading scorer, chalking up fifteen tries during his first season. He actually won four of his seven caps at Llanelli before he went on to play for Cardiff; scoring thirty four tries out of thirty five games during his first season with them. While at Hunslet between 1949 and 1956, he scored one hundred and sixteen tries and fifteen Welsh Rugby League Caps. He retired from rugby in 1956 to become the Assistant Director of Physical Education for the Cornwall Education Board. he stayed there for a quarter of a century and was eventually given the Freedom of the town of Falmouth. He also shone in the world of athletics, becoming the World Record Holder for the over sixties in the 200 and the 60 metres. He also became the British record holder for the Triple Jump, and he also represented this country at the World Veterans' Championships in Puerto Rico in 1983. He even took up Rock-Climbing and Canoeing as he grew older. It seems that there was no holding this guy. The mind boggles to think what might have been if Cockburn had been a rugby school. Les, who was born on May 10th 1922, died on January 27th 2006. He wasn't quite 84. As far as sport is concerned, for all us Old Cockburnians, this man should be a shining example for us all to be proud of. I hope that his name is up in lights at the new Cockburn.

Date:
01-Aug-2009

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Swain

Comment:
I still walk the tiled corridors of Cockburn in my dreams. My memories are of that palace of a building and my friends - dont remember much of what I was taught. Teachers - Miss Pickles, on the verve of a nervous breakdown, Hawkeye, acktung, Starbuck, played by Donald Pleasence (Blofeld). Richard Hoggart went to Cockburn - it's in his autobiography.

Date:
26-Aug-2009

Email:
john.swain@unn.ac.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Mick Speke

Comment:
I too loved my time at Cockburn. I started on 9th September 1971 (still have the blazer and tie somewhere)through until when I left the sixth form in 1978. I was the last year to enter Cockburn at age 11 following my 11+ and we were the last proper Cockburn Grammar School intake. After that, as Leeds had adopted the three school fully comprehensive system new entrants came to the school in the third form. I suppose the writing was on the wall. Whilst we were kept separate from the "comprehensive kids", the uniform seemed not to apply to them (was this a decision of trendy 70's teachers out voting Mr Starbuck). But, as kids do, we convinced ourselves ( probably unjustifiably)that we were true Cockburnians and therefore superior. I was interested in the comments of Steve Smith (Steve - you were my form teacher in your first year at Cockburn as a teacher(did you replace DWC) 3B2 in the only form room on the ground floor) and it seems such a shame that a lovely building's demise was essentially caused by carelessness, although the "new sixth form block" still stands.....many happy hour in the common room with Miss Milner poppoing in to ask us to turn the volume on the record player down a bit! Even when I arrived in 1971 Mr Smith (the old Mr Smith) who was my form teacher in 1S still wore his gown , as did Miss Pickles and Mr Thompson (Big T), Mt Hughes ( deputy head) and of course T E N Starbuck. In comparison, Bob Gregg (surely the model fomany a games teacher depicted on Grange Hill)just seemed to wear a sheepskin coat. When I first arrived there were still some of the older teahers that many of you who were there before me may remember. In September 1979 I remember the following being there:- Mr Starbuck, Mr Hughes ( deputy - replaced later by Mr Brown)Mr J Smith, Miss Pickles, Mr Rhodes, Bob Newton, Jack Collinson, Mr Mason (History) Miss Milner, Mr Bowman (music), Mrs Lowe (maths) Mr Caton (metalework)Miss Melor ( not for long though I remeber she had a slipped disc) Mr Densley (English) Mr Thompson (what a star - didn't suffer fools pupils OR staff) Mr Mawhinney, Mr Hawkins,. Interestingly a friend of mine who started at Cockburn a year or two before me went to an interview. They looked at his CV and said "Oh you went to Cockburn then - oh that's very good"

Date:
14-Oct-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Yvonne Medcalf

Comment:
I attended Cockburn from 1965 to 1972. Mr TEN Starbuck was headmaster and Miss Milner was headmistress for the girls. One of the best teachers was Mr Newton who taught me in art for 7 years. I remember chatting in class with my friend Diane Stacey and Mr Newton slapped the back of our heads (gently)for talking while he was talking. The RE teacher Mr Smith used to throw the board rubber at pupils if they misbehaved. We had to learn ballroom dances for the Christmas party, and in the months up to Christmas girls had to wait for one of the boys to ask them to the dance. Anyone not asked didn't have a partner for any of the dances. I remember being asked by Brian Proctor. We weren't allowed to wear make-up or jewellery at school and one day in domestic science class Mrs Salisbury the teacher noticed that Christine Orange was wearing mascara - she dragged her to the nearest cloakroom and scrubbed her face.

Date:
13-Nov-2009

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Susan Spencer then Cannon

Comment:
Just to say thanks to all for bringing so many memories back! If Frances Hainsworth is or rather was who I think, we were pupils at the same time and lived not far from each other. One memory I have of the Gym was the fist year Christmas Party, and this will not be believed by anyone under the age of 55. It was 1961- I was 11 and had a blue party dress with stiffened net skirt (all made by my great aunt Lily) plus short socks/silver shoes. We had previously, during PE, been given dancing lessons-the waltz was all we managed I recall, so on the great day we were marched down to the gym where chairs had been placed down each side, boys were seated down one side and girls the other, and when the music started the boys were obliged to go across the floor and ask one of the girls to dance-refusal on either side was not an option.Incredible now isn't it? I also remember singing in the chorus behind Jean in the Mikado and The Gondoliers- the tradition was G and S one year and a "Play" the next. This also reminded me of singing in Sid Bowman's Madrigal Group. I remember that one year the appearance of The Beatles at the Odean Cinema in Leeds clashed with Speech Day-held in those days in Leeds Town Hall, and an early exit was permited for some pupils. However as said Madrigal Group were performing I was refused permission and had to sell my ticket, I made a profit - so all was not lost. Better stop the memories now, but thanks again, and may I also add my sorrow at hearing of the death of Bob Newton.

Date:
24-Jan-2010

Email:
susannamargarita@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Helen

Comment:
I didn't go to Cockburn school but after reading all the comments I just need to say that this must have been a very good school. The grammar and spelling of all the ex-pupils is excellent. It makes me cringe sometimes when I read peoples comments and realise that not everyone had a good education. I like to think of myself as one of the lucky ones. I went to Roundhay High School when it was all girls. It wasn't too bad, the boys were just next door!

Date:
02-Jul-2010

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Alan Rawlinson

Comment:
I attended at the same time as Graham Schofield(Gas to his friends) It wasn't the happiest time for me, being a bit of a rebel at the time. I expected the teaching staff to control me but they just left me to do as I liked until I left. I do remember one or two teachers, Mr Sutcliffe who liked to put his arm around the girls, Les Williams and miss Hodgson, one of the few teacher who new how to make me work. I remember Mr Parker too, he tried to bully me but it didn't work, much to his disgust. For all the problems I caused I did receive a good education.

Date:
27-Aug-2010

Email:
jaymar@sky.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Jen Lovelock

Comment:
History of Cockburn - does anyone know who installed 'electricity' at Cockburn Grammar School. This is in connection with family history - the story is that it was an Arthur Scholefield - any info around? Thanks.

Date:
05-Sep-2010

Email:
jenlovelock@googlemail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
June Bastable (nee Murphy)

Comment:
In reply to Helen's comment, I can spot various errors in spelling and punctuation in these messages! Take another look! Miss Milner was the best English teacher, Herbie Thompson was a good teacher in spite of not being a nice person, Mr Chell was a wonderful French master and a lovely man. Sorry to hear about Mr Newton's death - he was at our 2004 reunion at the Broadway, Dewsbury Road. By the way Graham Schofield (GAS), you sat next to me in the first form - we had Miss Cave as form mistress - but that was definitely in 1950 and not 1949. You escorted me into supper at our first Christmas dance in the gym.

Date:
28-Sep-2010

Email:
junembastable@tiscali.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Terry Stones

Comment:
I went to Cockburn from 1945 to 1950, then to Leeds University thanks to three excellent teachers - Mr Thompson ( physics ) , Mr Dixon and Mrs Sharpe ( both Maths ). Cockburn was an excellent school which enabled many kids from the working class areas of Beeston and Hunslet to reach their potential.

Date:
06-Oct-2010

Email:
terry@camdon.plus.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Sparling

Comment:
I attended Cockburn at the same time as Beryl (1948-53) and of the assorted teachers mentioned, our form mistress, who nobody apart from me seems to remenber was Mrs Teale (I still owe 1000 lines!).Mr Wellburn taught my sister(9 years my senior)and myself Maths.Other teachers who taught us both were Miss Anson (english), Mr Cubitt (art), Mr Parker (physics). I also remember Miss Mills (english) who was a newcomer whilst we were there; good looking but a bit of a tartar! Miss Louis taught music and dropped me in it one open day! I am now 73 and still have my Cross Flatts and Cockburn (2b) photos

Date:
08-Nov-2010

Email:
john.sparling@tesco.net

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Pat Benatmane (nee Barber)

Comment:
My mother, brother and myself all went to Cockburn. I was there until 1967 and went to train as a teacher. My inspiration for being a teacher was Mr Pellant, who taught English. He used to sit on the floor at the back of the class on the girls' side.Sometimes he turned up in odd socks. When we were studying T S Elliott in the 6th form, he said "Ask me anything," meaning about the poetry. One girl piped up,"Do cats have periods?" After I had been teaching for 3yrs I returned to teach art. I think my form was 4D. Half the school was in uniform; the other half in flares, etc. First day they threw a plant, which I had taken in to brighten the room, out of the window (top floor above the playground!). Next day a chair went. Those in uniform acted superior to the "plebs" and the streaming was so obvious that the lower streams must have given up or rebelled as soon as they sarted. A terribly unjust way to end Cockburn, because my own time there as a pupil had been happy - except when Bob Newton took one of my canvasses, a work in progress, and white-washed over it to give the board to someone else.

Date:
21-Dec-2010

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Ian Ingram

Comment:
I attended between 1961 and 1968. I have mixed feelings about my time there, but did enjoy the sixth form. We weren't allowed to take Art after the end of the second form, and could opt for it in the sixth form instead of games. The large art room windows can be seen mid-picture, top floor. [The ground floor corner room was a science room - biology?] Despite my late re-arrival into Art, Mr Newton was inspirational and supportive and played a considerable part in my progression to art school. I'm sorry to hear of his death. The other inspirational teacher at that time was Mr. Pellant, who brought alive English Literature. He used to teach in Burton House, sometimes from a horizontal position on the trestle tables in the teaching rooms over there. I dreaded Latin with Mr Taylor. Mr Nettleship sticks in my memory for asking me if I was "going to grow up to be a bus conductor". Although I didn't quite understand it at the time, the streaming of entry in 1961 reflected the occupation of your parents. There were four classes, each of thirty kids: 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D. The streaming reflected the positioning of the School between Beeston and Hunslet. At the time, Beeston was much more middle-class than Hunslet, so the majority of 1A and 1B came from blue-collar backgrounds, 1C and 1D from manual work background. It's interesting to look back with the realisation that many of the students in the sixth form, six years later, were from the better-off background. What happened to the educational development of the 1C and 1D streams at Cockburn?

Date:
03-Jan-2011

Email:
ian@ianingram.eclipse.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Dennis Brook

Comment:
I attended Cockburn between 1963 and 1968. Bob Newton (art) was my form master when I was in the fifth form (5B).I remember he was a weight-lifter and on one occasion he lifted a disruptive pupil off his desk with one hand round his lapels! Other teachers I remember were Mr Green (English), Mr Creighton (chemistry), Mr Rhodes (maths) - I remember Mr Rhodes owning a red Morgan car.Mr Glanville, also maths, left teaching to go into the commercial world. My maths teacher was female but I can't remember her name. All the teachers wore gowns but I do not remember any mortars. Happy Days!

Date:
30-Mar-2011

Email:
dennis.brook@sword-intech.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Anne

Comment:
some of you who good memories of maths teacher Bill Rhodes will be sorry to hear that he died suddenly on 7 April. I'm not an old pupil, just a family friend.

Date:
19-Apr-2011

Email:
carolan7@yahoo.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Mike Magee

Comment:
The photo probably predates all of us. Low Road School did not have a good record for 11+ passes. Two years before me, Alan Baxter passed, and in the same year as me, Georgina Collins, a record year! We came to Cockburn in 1953, and I left in 1960. I recollect many of the teachers mentioned by others here, but I am surprised no one has mentioned Mr Grant, the chemistry teacher, whom everyone called "Solly". He was Jewish, and inspired me to take up chemistry. He seemed to suffer from migraine and used to send pupils over to the shop for packets of Anadin. Many of the teachers had nicknames, not always flattering, and the female teachers were customarily called "Ma" when they were being spoken about. Thus the English teacher was Ma Milner (I cannot remember one called Mills), maths teachers were Ma Sharp and Ma Hodgson, and so on. On the first parents' day my mother and father attended, my mother told me, when they had returned, that she was quite shocked to meet "Ma Milner" because she was young and fashionable -- she had been expecting an old dragon. In the first and second forms we had a very good female history teacher, but I cannot remember her name. Mr Newton, the art teacher, was indeed a friendly modern teacher. I liked art but didn't take it seriously. Parker (Physics) was a minimalist teacher, teaching just what you needed, whereas Mr Thompson, also physics, and, as I recall, head of the evening Institute at the school, taught in huge detail. Mr H Thomson (English) was horrible to juniors but became chummy when you got to the fifth and sixth forms! Rockcliffe was the reason I didn't opt for German, he was a rotter, but Chell was good. I was useless at Latin, and Taylor told me I would fail. Perhaps it was psychology because I scraped through with 50%. Sutcliffe, an excellent headmaster, left while I was there and went to, I think, the Haberdashers' school in London. Starbuck took over, an unpleasant man. For the Christmas party, as some have said, we had to do dancing -- mainly not ballroom, except for the waltz, but social and sequence dancing like the Gay Gordons and the Veleta. Lads that were a bit backwards like myself felt quite uncomfortable having to get so close to girls. Strange how things change! Among the pupils who became well known, from that period, is Glenn Baxter, the aforementioned A Baxter's younger brother, well known as an artist and cartoonist -- two years below me in my sister's year. Not well known but very successful from my own years are Peter McPhie, who went to the USA to work at the NIH as a spectroscopist, and has written many scientific papers in a working lifetime there, and George Clark, a Head Boy and notable swimmer, who had a career at Geigy in Switzerland where he has lived for much of his life. It is a school worth remembering, a great school, with mainly excellent teachers.

Date:
20-May-2011

Email:
mikemagee@askwhy.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
jackie boyes

Comment:
i have very fond memories of cockburn grammer school, even though i never attended, this may seem strange but my brother graham boyes went and was headboy in 1968/69. he had so much fun with his mates there and we laughed many a day about there antics. the school was excellent and the education second to none. i would love to hear from any one who was there with graham and maybe we can relive some of them. unfortuanatly graham is no longer here, but these memories are so precious

Date:
21-Jul-2011

Email:
jackieboyes@btinternet.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Frances Hainsworth (nee West)

Comment:
Regarding Christine Heberton's comments about Mr. Nettleship..are you not getting him confused with Mr. Jackson who couldn't say boo to a goose? Mr Nettleship had dark, floppy hair and bore a striking resemblance to Snape, and I doubt he knew how to blush whereas with Mr. Jackson making him blush was oh so easy.

Date:
28-Jul-2011

Email:
fghainsworth@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
Hello Frances Hainsworth. Regarding your comments about Mr Nettleship, I would draw your attention to Wikipedia where there is an entry about the Mr Nettleship who inspired the character of 'Snape' in Rowling's books. Interestingly, he was at the University of Leeds in the late 1950s studying chemistry. But the entry goes on to say that after leaving University he went to Birmingham and taught there for a while, then in 1970 he went to a post in Wales, and then to the school in Gloucestershire where he taught J. K. Rowling. So, this teacher does not seem to have been at Cockburn High School. He died, by the way, this year (2011)and there are several internet sites where he is mentioned, with pictures. Yes, the other Mr Nettleship that I remember did have dark hair but to my mind did not resemble 'Snape' in other facial features - and he did blush easily when a trainee teacher, but toughened up in later years. My strongest memories of him are from 1962-1964 when in the Sixth Form - we used to call him 'Battleship' - after the fondness for a game that lots of pupils engaged in at that time. I note that you started Cockburn in 1960 (3 years after me) - this would mean that you were probably not exposed to Mr Nettleship in his very early days at the school. However, it might be interesting to speculate that the two Nettleships are related in some way!

Date:
05-Aug-2011

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Maureen Carrick (nee Nichols)

Comment:
I also attended Cockburn from 1955 to 1960 and thoroughly enjoyed all my time there. It was a fabulous school to be a pupil at. Many memories of teachers, Mr Moss, a great teacher,Miss Hodgson,Mr Taylor whom I loathed,Miss Brown PE, and many more whom I can recall very well. I had a great education there and was very sorry when I heard that it had been pulled down,never to be forgotten by most of its past pupils I imagine.

Date:
15-Aug-2011

Email:
imcarrick4@bigpond.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Stowell

Comment:
I am looking for information on the school from about 1940 to 1948 when I believe a cousin of mine, John Quintin Stowell PHILLIPS attended the school. Possibly school photos from that time? See web page www.stowell.net.nz/surnames/phil1565.html.

Date:
12-Sep-2011

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Darryl Johnson

Comment:
Great picture. I'm not sure it's the fogging of an antique lens, unstable chemistry or the effect of the persistent smogs that used to squat in the Aire Valley in the city's industrial heyday; but the way the verdigrised towers sink into the mist is just how it was on many a day in the 60s. The large windows on the upper floor belong to the Art Room where I spent many hours in the VI Form, bespattered in oil paint as I entertained the fantasy that I was surely South Leeds' answer to Robert Rauschenberg. Bob Newton did his bit to bring me down to earth by mockingly calling me 'Picasso'. He wasn't necessarily the most up to date art teacher of his generation but he was that wonderful mixture of martinet and indulgent uncle that typified many working class men of his time and life experience. My father was another of the same type. As an old boy of the school, he was 'the real deal'. He'd been through the same portal out of the mean streets and into the English Middle Class - which is what Cockburn was for the majority of its pupils - and had, I think, a greater empathy with the social adjustment that being there involved. Sifting through the comments here, there's a very strong theme of gratitude for the upward mobility and cultural development the school provided. This was clearly the purpose of its founders and it's probable that those of us who attended it in the post-war years were experiencing the full flowering of their egalitarian intentions. I'd add my tuppence worth (a sum that would have got you a decent 'cider' in the 'tuckshop' - an institution oddly omitted in peoples' recollections?) of gratitude. It was a good school and had some excellent teachers. Among my favourites were, Miss Williamson (English) very sexy; Mr Burley (History) not very sexy but very Patrician and erudite; the aforementioned Mr Newton (Art) and Mr Starbuck himself who filled in for a term or two in History at some point. I also thought he played the Headmaster role to perfection. In public, remote and seemingly unapproachable; in private rather warm and friendly. When I confessed that I was non-plussed about my future in a careers interview with him he asked me if I had considered teaching? It took me a millisecond to dismiss the notion and he smiled and said that if I could be that emphatic I should never ever consider the possibility. I followed his advice, even when urged to get a teaching diploma'insurance policy' after art school. But I guess the real impact on my consciousness was made by the building itself. Externally, it was very powerful, forbidding even, as it is in this excellent image. I think some literary types called it the 'Chateau D'If). Inside, it was a very impressive and even elegant exercise in enlightened fitness-for-purpose, with lots of natural light and interesting features. Tony Yuille talks about the War Memorial which was very impressive and impeccably kept. I hope that it and its adjacent honours boards were rescued before demolition? The silent corridor in which it sat was scented with a perfume of sulphides and beeswax that oozed from its chemistry laboratories and glistening parquet floor. I loved the cream tiled walls and the solid stone stair cases with iron rails and the oak and cast-iron desks with their sixty-odd years of distracted scratchings. I loved the Gym and its curiously greenhouse-like changing room with its soft diffusion of light, duckboards and gentle body odour. I loved the boys' yard, with its thoughtfully designed wall bays that made excellent goals for the four million or so football games that occurred at every break. I loved the girls' yard because it had girls in it, thoughtfully designed by God, and I loved Burton House with its Jane Austen sewing room qualities. With exception of the dinner huts and the swill served in them. I loved it all, really.

Date:
27-Oct-2011

Email:
darryl@fenco.demon.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Lynn Rhodes

Comment:
I attended here in the late 1970s. Thank you Mick Speke for reminding me of the teacher's names, the passage of time has erased their faces.

Date:
03-Nov-2011

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Jonathan (Jon) Lewis

Comment:
Great memories. I was at Cockburn from 1964 until O-levels in 1969 - when the family moved South. The History Teacher - Mr Mason I think - inspired me to go on to study the subject at university. I guess the imposing and historical old building also played a part in this. To add to the list of characters: Miss Brown the fearsome Gym teacher; Mr Bowman the music teacher; Mr Mahwinny the Irish English teacher. It would be great to get in contact with former class mates.

Date:
05-Jan-2012

Email:
Jon.Lewis@dpw.gov.za

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Carole McCulloch (Atkinson)

Comment:
I attended Cockburn from 1960 to 1967 and loved my time there. What happy memories and how I have enjoyed reading everyone's else's memories.I loved the grandeur of it-the war memorial in the main entrance, the science lecture theatres, my smart uniform from Rawcliffes! Goodness knows how my parents paid for it. I recall the school colours were brown and 'tussure' not cream!I recall great teachers particularly Mr Pelham who taught me English in the sixth form in Burton House. We had lessons on a Friday afternoon and he used to buy us lollies. I think we all got an A at A level.Were the geograhy teachers Mr Smith and Miss Crowther an item? We all said they were!I remember a lovely maths teacher called Mr Granville we all drooled over and was sad to hear of the death of Bill Rhodes.I remember the grandeur of speech day in the town hall, coats to be hung in the west riding court.I loved the sixth form, I was a prefect, and we organised the common room and disco. We were allowed to smoke, courtesy of Mr Starbuck. They were probably two of the happiest years of my life. I have since gone on to inspect independent schools but have never come across a finer school than Cockburn. Thank you Leeds and all those teachers who taught us the best of everythng.

Date:
05-Jan-2012

Email:
caroletdf@aol.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Crowther

Comment:
I never attended Cockburn, however the schoolyards provided a fantastic play area outside of school hours as I lived opposite the school in Linden Grove from 1948-1961. The dividing wall separating the top yard from the next serving as a tennis net for many a long hour and I still play today, the middle yard and more so the big yard at the bottom end serving as football or cricket pitches from where we not only played amongst ourselves but also in made up games against kids from other local streets. I do also remember the outside toilet block running alongside the 2 upper yards as quite often the walls would serve as a shooting area when we dreamt of playing for Leeds. Incidentally, the partial name on the store next door was Millards where I recall we could obtain a bag of broken biscuits quite often in the 50's. The only local lad I can recall attending the school was Alan Broadley who lived in the same street?

Date:
06-Jan-2012

Email:
john-crowther3@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Jon Lewis

Comment:
Carole McCullochs' comments brought back memories of school uniform lists - detailed lists specifying the colour of socks and underwear - to be taken to Rawcliffes. One correction - Mr Smith - if memory serves - was the Religious Knowledge teacher. I would hesitate to speculate on the nature of the relationship with Ms Crowther - other than to say that complete decorum was observed at all times.

Date:
09-Jan-2012

Email:
jon.lewis@dpw.gov.za

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
donald rhodes

Comment:
even though i never went to cockburn school,i remember that their dark brown uniforms were a red rag to a bull for us from rowland road school. when ANY snow fell they were fair game for us to be snowballed and even rubbed in it.

Date:
30-Jan-2012

Email:
donrhodes@pac.com.au

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Diane Fyfe Cyr (Blackburn)

Comment:
Stumbled on this reminiscent photo of CHS...I attended 1956-63 ...in fact, was Head Girl 62-63....emigrated to Canada with my then husband, Malcolm Lambourne (deceased) in 1969. I remained in education and retired at a Director of Education...I onced gave a speech at a high school graduation on 'non scholae, sed vitae'....Thanks to my great start in education at Cockburn High!

Date:
01-Feb-2012

Email:
dianeandjohncyr@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Walker

Comment:
I attended Cockburn from 1965 to 1970.-Best years of my life!

Date:
02-Feb-2012

Email:
roywalker101@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Frances Hainsworth (nee West)

Comment:
It was rumoured that Mr. Smith and Miss Crowther were cousins!!! For those who want to put faces to the names you remember there is a gallery of photographs on Friends Reunited.

Date:
29-Feb-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Peter Nuttall

Comment:
I have had a request from an ex-pupil for photos of Cockburn from the 1970s - apparently they are needed for a reunion for Cockburn ex-pupils to be held on March 24th. Can anyone help?

Date:
08-Mar-2012

Email:
nuttalpj01@leedslearning.net

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
saeed sharif

Comment:
I ATTENDED THIS GREAT SCHOOL IN ITS LAST YEARS UP TILL IT WAS CLOSED DOWN MID 80'S DUE TO ASBESTOS AND THEN DEMOLISHED!!!!!!! HEART BREAKING FROM THE PREVIOUS STORIES!!! EVERYONE SAYS THE BASEMENT WAS A GYM BUT WHEN I WAS THERE IT WAS A WORKSHOP FOR WOODWORK????? LOTS OF GOOD MEMORIES THANKYOU TO ALL WHO HAVE GIVEN YOUR MEMORIES

Date:
10-Mar-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Colin(rossy) Ross

Comment:
Wow..!! I'm blown away with some of the old Cockburnian's comments, I too graced the Hallowed Halls of Cockburn High School, 1967-72. I actually recognize a few names as well, very saddened to hear of some of the old "battleaxes" are no longer with us, especially my old maths and art teachers, Bill Rhodes and bob (Mr muscles) Newton, but probably more saddened to hear about Graham Boyes.... I've had many an imposition from him, with classics like" I must learn to abandon my anti-social attitudes" written on both sides of foolscap (tiny spaced lines) paper..not sure whether I have abandoned them..?, but i learned how to write with two or three pens tied together, so my physics lessons came in handy..lol my fondest memories are the girls...(sigh..!) classics like...Nellie(aka Angela Nelson), Alison Twaites, Loz, Lorraine McGuire,'Billy'(Gillian) Mace, Booby Dawson...etc, etc...Happy days Indeed... I now live around 12,500 miles away in Auckland New Zealand, but I'll never forget the old school, mates and teachers..as if you could forget names like"Fanny" Pickles, french teacher, Hitler Thompson, Physics teacher...priceless...!! I'm still fit and well and as nutty as ever..but my school education was worth it's weight in gold... I still cannot forget the formulae for the cosine rule, simultaneous equations..there imprinted on my grey cells for time immemorial, or such things as the Hampden Court conference, gunpowder plot, ...inverted "dovetail" joints...blooming good teaching that's what it boils down to...three cheers for the School "Non scholae sed vitae" - Not school but life... absolutely.... I wish all you old scholars a long and fulfilling life and hope you all benefited in some large or small way from your school experiences feel free to e-mail me... :))

Date:
16-Mar-2012

Email:
colross@xtra.co.nz

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
I was at Cockburn in the early 1950's, and am somewhat confused by Saeed Sharif's comment about the location of the Woodwork Dept.. The design of the school meant that its four sides formed a huge open central space, which at floor level created a large internal quadrangle. This area with its glass roof was made into a large gymnasium, which also became a theatre or dance-hall when the demand was there. The wood-work dept., and the adjacent engineering workshop, were on the same floor level (basement), but situated in a corner of one wing of the main building. The location can be understood from the above picture, as being out of shot to the left. Does Saeed's comment imply that the Gym. had been abandoned, and that physical education was no longer practiced during the final years of the school's existence? Or is his memory playing tricks? After all the woodwork dept. would have been dwarfed in that huge space. Can anyone add any further information?

Date:
12-Apr-2012

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
malcolm dawson

Comment:
I too was a pupil at this great institution of learning from 1958 t0 1965 along with tony yuille. we were both prefects in our 6th form year. My memory is of Jim Unsworth (PE) who gave me my love of sport and set me on my future career. I can remember those christmas dances and the many "liaisons" that were set up before them - I wonder how many lasted! Tony and Daryl Johnson were part of our great football team of the 60 's. Great school for sport.

Date:
14-May-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
David Long

Comment:
I remember the gowns but definitely no mortar boards. I was there from 1959 to 1966 & I particularly remember getting on the bus at Middleton on a sunny winter's day & descending into a sea of yellow & black smog as it descended down the Ring Road on to Dewsbury Road arriving at school with black smudges on collar & face! Then the Clean Air Act came along & we could all breathe at last! 5th & 6th forms were the best times - 64 to 66 - great laughs great girls & lads.

Date:
06-Jun-2012

Email:
long.dave1@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Brian Robinson

Comment:
The original Cockburn High School in this picture went through three stages: 1. From its completion by 1907 to around 1947 it was a unique co- educational grammar school with a majority of fee paying pupils and a large minoriy of scholarship holders on free places. It was a tremendous asset to education in the district, more so than the later Roundhay and Lawnswood High Schools in their more affluent surroundings. The more able Cockburn pupils in this era went on to gain School Certificate/Matriculaution and a very few stayed on in the sixth form for Higher School Certificate and possible university entrance. However just having a secondary education before 1939 was a privilege enjoyed by only 10% of the age group nationally. The last headteacher in this period was Mr George Taylor who went on to become Director of Education for Leeds. 2. After the passing of the 1944 Education Act, from around 1947 to around 1972, only pupils who had passed the 11+ exam were admiitted to Cockburn. Fee paying was no more and the aim was 'secondary education for all' (provided through the bi-partite system of grammar and secondary modern schools). As O and A levels came in in 1951, the exam results improved even further with more going into the sixth form and on to university. The first headteacher in this period, following on from Mr George Taylor, was Mr Kenneth Sutcliffe who stayed around ten years before going to become head of the renown Latymer Upper School, Hammersmith, in west London. 3. In the early 1970s Leeds made the decision to follow most other local authorities and change from a selective system of secondary education to a comprehensive one, prompted by the government Circular 10/65. So Cockburn became a 13+ comprehensive high school, which completely changed its character and standing in the local community which had increased social deprivation and a mutlicultural population. It encountered hitherto unknown problems with academic achievement and pupil behaviour. The building which had been so avant-garde in the early 1900s had now become oudated and a liability, unfit for purpose. This was confirmed by the discovery of asbestos in its structure and by the mid 1980s it was closed and demolished. There was surely a case for its closure in the 1970s after seven decades of meritous service to the working class pupils of south Leeds but presumably it was kept open in view of the financial difficulties facing the education service in Leeds and elsewhere. Cockburn in this final period had to compete with new purpose-built comprehensive schools with modern facilities, surrounded by grassed areas, trees and open spaces. It obviously came off second best and was almost doomed from the start in this old building. A very sad end to a success story. One question remains. Why was it decided that the name of Cockburn must be continued into the new era and so adopted by a 11-16 comprehensive school in Beeston? Possibly it was thought that it would raise pupil aspirations like the original Cockburn. However the name Cockburn would mean nothing to its late 20th century pupils. To older people in south Leeds it may have been confusing, like adopting someone else's identity. Might it not have been wiser to let the name Cockburn go into the history books with the demolition of the original building and to have instead looked forward to the key tasks of a new comprehensive school - catering for the needs of different ethnic groups, pastoral care, parent and community support - all light years away from the Cockburn of old.

Date:
13-Jun-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Knapp

Comment:
I went to CHS from 1945 to 1950. The headmaster was Mr Taylor,and the headmistress Miss Hillary, and the deputy head was Mr Champion My first form teacher was Miss Malins. later Mr Taylor was succeeded by Mr Sutcliffe,and Miss Hillary by Miss Dedicoat. Mr Champion (a superb physics teacher) was still Deputy head when I left. I remember with pleasure teachers like Mr Welburn (maths) Mr Hillas (history) Mr Kerry (english) Miss Crowther (geography) Mr Grant (chemistry).With less pleasure (because I didn't like the subjects!) were Mr Rockliffe, Mr Taylor, Miss Alcock, Mr Scales, Miss Jordan,Miss Pickles. I remember many teachers wearing gowns, but not mortar boards. At Speech Day (held in Salem Chapel) most wore university hoods. Swimming lesons were held in Joseph Street baths, and it took half the alloted period to get there and back, the annual swimming gala was at Armley baths which entailed 2 tram journeys to get there. It would be interesting to hear more memories from anyone of my era. Is Brian Robinson the same one who was in the sixth form in 1950 and was very friendly with John Brennand?

Date:
30-Jun-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
donald rhodes

Comment:
you guys who went to cockburn are so lucky.not because of the school,but i was at nearby rowland road and there are no comments from ex pupils,except some from the girls school. i was at r/r from 1941 to leaving in 1952.

Date:
10-Aug-2012

Email:
donrhodes@pac.com.au

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Andrea Drury

Comment:
I went to this School in the 1980s, such an amazing building, with lots of no go areas would have loved to have had the chance to explore fully.

Date:
19-Sep-2012

Email:
andreadrurylawrence@yahoo.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Garry Freeman

Comment:
Wow, the memories come flooding back when I see this photo! I was the only boy in my class at Rowland Road Primary School to pass the 11+ and go to Cockburn HS. I was there 1966-1973 and they were truly great years! Met some fantastic friends there, John Storey, Ian Laycock, Kevin Beckwith. Yes the boys and girls had separate playgrounds and I recall, clearly, getting to the age of 12 and admiring the older girls in their playground, especially on windy days! There were some brilliant, iconoclastic teachers: Mr Hutchinson who inspired me to go on, study History and become a History teacher; Mr Mason the other main History teacher; Mr Smith who taught RK; Mr Starbuck of course, the Headmaster; Mr Hughes, Deputy Headmaster and teacher of French (whom everyone called Blossom when I was there); Mr Lucas, a tall, imposing man who was Deputy Headmaster before Mr Hughes; the indomitable Miss Milner who taught me Latin and gave me a lifelong love of the subject and a consequent understanding of English language; Mr Thomson in Physics, who ice have me and John Storey an after school detention and forgot all about us until 5o'clock!; Mr Crighton the mad Chemistry teacher; Mr Gregg, the barking ( and I mean that nicely) PE teacher; Miss Pickles and Mr Biggin in French; the wonderful Mr Bowman in Music; the fantastic Mr Mawhinney in English; Miss Rigg who taught us English, and whom everyone believed to be the sister of Diana Rigg from The Avengers!; Miss Hirst who was my Form Teacher in 1967 and taught us English, all long hair and mini skirt. Thing is that when I taught at East Leeds High School as Head of Humanities Faculty from 1992-1996, Sue was there again and it was great to work with her as a colleague! There were two Maths teachers whose names I cannot remember, one a woman and the other a Pakistani man whose knowledge of his subject was absolutely amazing and inspiring but who just couldn't control a class. I can see him now in his dark blue suit, all 3 buttons fastened no matter what the weather. There was Mr Green who taught English and was my first Form Teacher in 1966; Terry Hawkins, he of the corduroy jacket and quaffed hair, who taught German, a subject I never studied at school but am self taught in, and who was my Form Teacher in the 4th year. Miss Saunders taught Geography; R Newton and Mr Caton taught woodwork/metalwork. Yes, at least in the first few years I was there, most teachers wore gowns but never mortar boards. I do recall the strict uniform requirements and having to go to Rawcliffes in Leeds to buy everything. My Mum and Dad bought me the better quality blazer, at £8 almost a weeks wages for him at that time, and put everything on the never-never! Great days! Feel free to email me I'd you were there at that time!

Date:
14-Oct-2012

Email:
freemag02@leedslearning.net

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Pat Benatmane - was Barber

Comment:
The memorial boards are on display/storage at the new Cockburn. I'm surprised no-one mentioned Miss Cooper, a short teacher who taught art/ art history - inspirational. I bumped into her just 2 summers ago and she remembered me and my brother instantly. The uniform colours were always called Old Gold and Nigger Brown in our era (60s)with a gingham check dress for summer in either yellow, green or purple. We were also put in Houses - mine was Murray and the colour green. I took part in many plays, including Under Milk Wood directed by Mr Bennett, and A Man for All Seasons playing Thomas Moore's daughter. I had to speak in Latin to Henry VIII - we were the only 2 in the cast who didn't do Latin, so we had to speak it parrot-fashion and were coached by Miss Milner in the pronunciation. What was the name of the English teacher from Wales with a terrible temper? He picked up 2 boys in our first year and crashed their heads together for talking - scared us all silly.

Date:
15-Nov-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Frances Hainsworth@gmail.com

Comment:
Pat...the name of the English teacher was Mr. Owen, he used to throw board rubbers and pieces of chalk as well as knocking heads together.

Date:
21-Nov-2012

Email:
fghainsworth@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Pat Benatmane's comment about Miss Milner coaching her in how to speak her lines in Latin for the play, reminds me how "English Teachers" of yesterday, were far better prepared to teach the "Understanding Of Our Language" than their counterparts are today. If I remember correctly, an 'English Teacher' had to be conversant or knowledgeable in the two main important elements of our language - Latin and Anglo-Saxon. Although we didn't realise it at the time, we as kids, in the 1950's were absorbing a far better understanding of our language than kids today ever will. How many know what an apostrophe is, never mind how to use one. Many don't even know how to speak the language:- "I fink I've developed a likink for summink wiv sweetnink in, - innit." Good heavens!!! When did we replace the letter "G" with a "K"? The more I look back at my time there, the more I come to realise what a wonderful 'Centre of Excellence' Cockburn was.

Date:
21-Nov-2012

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton (nee Gatehouse)

Comment:
In response to Pat Benatmane's query about the Welsh teacher, I think you are referring to Mr Owens. He was quite a controversial teacher in many ways but I never saw incidents of the kind you mention. And regarding Miss Cooper, I also remember her with affection and am pleased to know she is still around.

Date:
21-Nov-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Ian Smith

Comment:
I was at Cockburn between 1965 & 1970. Starbuck was still the Headmaster, always appeared to be quite an austere character. John Smith was my first form teacher there - a real character and I still have memories of him doing the Twist at that year's Christmas Party. The German Teacher, Terry Hawkins, was a playwright and I well remember being in "Paradise Street" and "Captain Clutterbuck's War" - great fun. We did our own Cockburn Film and "Radio Cockburn" with it's adverts for Canned Canary Crush" and other crazy products!!! The only time, outside of Speech Day, that I saw gowns being worn was at assembly when the Head and Miss Milner wore them. Bob Gregg was PE master, with Thompson doing Physics. All in all, those were good days and set me up for my future careers in the Royal Navy and BT.

Date:
25-Nov-2012

Email:
I.b.s@btinternet.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
Regarding comments about teachers throwing board rubbers, etc, the only experience I had of this was with the English teacher, Mr Thompson (mentioned by others). We had a double English grammar lesson on Monday mornings and used to be terrified of this teacher. He would have everyone standing up until they had answered a grammar question correctly and would often resort to shoving pupils in their desks or throwing things at them. On one occasion he asked a pupil for an example of a preposition and, when an answer was not forthcoming, the poor guy was brought out to the front of the class and made to sit UNDER the table! He was then asked continually for a preposition while the rest of the class looked on in embarrassed hilarity.......eventually this humiliating cue prompted the correct answer. Yes, Brian, if you are reading this - we all suffered for you!

Date:
28-Nov-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Darryl Johnson

Comment:
I never suffered Mr Owen's tantrums but I was punched in the stomach and knocked to the parquet by Mr Thompson. He taught English and was known as 'Herbie'. I was an 11 year old, in the First Form and played football for the Under 13s. We had a cup match to play, away to Wyther Park in west Leeds and had to leave early. My form had a gym lesson and Cyril Villiers (the best sports master in my time there) told me to get changed early, then go to Duggie Aveyard's classroom and wait outside until the bell sounded the end of the period so that I could then tell him where we were mustering. So there I was, standing outside Duggie's classroom when along came "Herbie" strolling down the corridor. As he drew abreast of me, he turned and punched me to the ground. It knocked the breath out of me and because it was so completely unexpected I was still trying to work out what had happened when he bent down and snarled "That's for being sent out of class boy!" When my breath returned I explained, through tearful eyes, that Mr Villiers had sent me to wait for Aveyard. No apology or concern. "Well that's for when you do get sent out of class." And with that the begowned figure strolled off. Hard to imagine him getting away with that today but as recent revelations have shown, those were very different days. I don't remember if I even mentioned the incident to my parents. If I did, they didn't do anything about it. If I didn't, it was because it seemed unexceptional. Corporal punishment, in the form of the cane was still in use and other teachers did not shrink from physical contact. One of my Geography teachers used to form the end of his gown sleeves into large, hard, conker-like knots. If you gave the wrong answer to his question he would provide you with the correct reply while emphasising it by beating out each syllable of his speech with a painful 'conker' blow to your head. Again, quite normal. I think Mr Thompson (or perhaps it was Thomson?) was moved on at some stage but I'm not sure when and for what. We won the match at Wyther Park, as we mostly did. I check this page fairly often. It's a lovely rolling history scroll and I hope it continues to trigger further memories from people. Friends and acquaintances from those days are welcome to get in touch via my Email.

Date:
07-Dec-2012

Email:
darrylj100@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Karen Lickley

Comment:
I have very fond memories of Cockburn, was also in the last Grammar school intake and left in 1971, I specifically remember Mr Creighton, Chemistry who no-one seems to have commented on, he scared me to death, also Mr Newton, who was an inspiration to me and a very accomplished artist in his own right, I remember him winning an award for a portrait of Mohammed Ali, and having a showing at the town hall. Mr Smith amused us all by driving a Mini, he was a large man and we would wait after school to watch him squeeze into it, the innocence of youth. We had very boring Computer studies lessons, having no computers we were restricted to endless binary! The teacher was very unsure and inapt, and sadly our class made his life pretty miserable. My Gym teacher was a very young beautiful blond, cannot remember her name (Clayton), but I distinctly remember all the boys lusting after her LOL. I also had a crush on Mr Greg. He took my for trampoline lessons, as you had to have male spotters. Mr Starbuck wanted to have me caned for smoking behind the tuck shop, but an ensuing visit from my father put paid to that. All in all it was the best of times.

Date:
21-Dec-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Ken Bywater

Comment:
References to Herbie Thompson are very accurate but do not go far enough. Were he teaching now, I have no hesitation in saying he would serve some time in prison. There were other incidents, even more sinister but better left unsaid after all this time. I was at the school from 1955 to 1960 and am rpoud to be associated with it. Incidentally, Cyril Villiers was a diamond and is still having an influence on sport. Google Cyril Villiers.

Date:
18-Jan-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Keith Butterield

Comment:
I am an ex Leeds Central High School pupil (1967-72)who was born in Beeston, moved to Bramley and then back to Beeston when I was 13. I knew Cockburn very well living in the area and my father went there in the 1930s until his Dad made him leave aged 14 because he would have had to pay school fees from that stage onwards! I also have vivid memories playing football for the Old Centralians agansit Old Cockburnians on the pitches on Middleton Grove just off Dewsbury Road. (on the opposite side of the road to the shops at the bottom of Tempest Road and Cross Flatts Park) I digress. On a photograph of my old school, there is a debate as to whether the old Head of Central High, Mr Rockliffe (Rocky) is the same man who was a German teacher at Cockburn. At the end there is agreement that it is indeed the same man. Well looking through the comments of this photograph of Cockburn, mention is made of a violent English teacher by the name of Mr Thompson. "Herbie" to his friends. Guess what? During my time at Leeds Central High School, the head of English was none other than "Herbie". Thompson. Pupils were very, VERY wary of him because of his violent outbursts, despite the fact he looked ancient to us. (I guess he would have been in his late 40s/early 50s) Sadly I once got took the brunt of an attack by Herbie. During a fifth form assembly, I was whispering to my neighbour during prayers. "Herbie" noticed this, (why didn't he have his head down too?!)and when the prayer was over, he waded through the ranks and hauled me out, dragging me by my blazer lapels. He dragged me into the corridor outside the hall where the assembly was taking place, and he started banging me backwards and forwards so hard against the glass and wood partition, that it started rattling and shaking and rocking against it's runners. In the process he ripped my shirt. Afterwards, my friends said even Mr Rockliffe, who was leading the assembly, winced as the noise of the partition could clearly be heard as I was thrown backwards and forwards against it. (During this time, "Herbie" was gripping my blazer lapels to propel me backwards and forwards!!) No harm was done - you crossed Herbie at your peril I guess and of course, I daren't tell my Mam how I actually ripped my shirt otherwise I'd have got another "clip" around the ear for misbehaving at school!! Later that year, my English teacher asked me to leave the lesson and see Mr Thompson in the corridor. I was petrified I was going to get another whacking but he was as nice as ninepence and asked if I would like to join the top group in the year for English! I declined his kind offer. So, it has got to be the same chap that was at Cockburn hasn't it? Same modus operandi in every way!

Date:
31-Jan-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
saeed sharif

Comment:
LOL !! great picture Graham has put in my mind !It was a great loss when they closed it down and we had to go to west park boys school by wallace arnold coaches every day which was good fun ! this was while the new cockburn high was being completed on gypsy lane.west park boys school was itself waiting to be demolished also !there was a new anex building built in the botom playground which is still being used today as a college i think ,plus a new sports gym on burton road in the early 80s which we us to use . a funny story for all you ex cobs is when the school closed down a few days later a lad started selling very cheap sweets at the tempary school everyone was over the moon at the bargains to be had only to see the police take the lad away!!!!!he had only stolen the sweets from the tuck shop trolley in the asbestos contaminated old school !

Date:
01-Feb-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Valerie Daniels

Comment:
I think my father (born in 1896) must have been one of the first pupils to attend Cockburn.

Date:
12-Mar-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Hargrave

Comment:
Reading through the comments and the fondness expressed for Bob Newton this memory came to mind. Bob never actually taught me but he was my form master in my 4th and 5th years - my final year being 1963. Bob was a keen on keeping fit and could often be seen pushing weights in the hall when he had a free period. He would welcome boys to join him after school in his weights sessions and my mates and I enjoyed this in our final two years. We naturally became firm friends with Bob. One day in my fifth year we were descending the main staircase when one of my friend pointed out that a 4th former had been chalking on the back of my jacket. The offending boy was pointed out and honor meant that he had to be dealt with for this lack of respect. We marched into the school yard amid chants of 'fight fight' - there was no going back. I threw a couple of punches and the 4th former responded with a few kicks. Thing got a bit feverish and when we were separated by the prefects I saw the lad had sustained a nasty gash over his eye. We were both marched to Rockys office where we were reprimanded and I was warned to expect further action from the boys parents. I returned to the form room and was discussing the fight with the boy in the desk behind me - my back to classroom door. The next thing I knew I was sat on the floor having received an almighty slap from my mate Bob - 'that's for not finishing him with one punch what's all the weight training been for?' Thats my memory of Bob - firm but fair and respected by all - good on yer Bob.

Date:
15-Mar-2013

Email:
johnhrgrv8@googlemail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Green rmgreen14@hotmail.co.uk

Comment:
What happened to all the blocks of cholate that we had to leave at school in case we were holed up during an air raid. During the war Leeds Central were kicked out of their cchool in the centre of Leeds and joined us.Many of their pupils were of jewiish parents and in view of the atrocities that were carried out in Germany at that time,these times were espescially pioniant for us.A lad suddenly appeared in our class called Weller.almost certainly a refuge from the continent.Miss Bartle who taught us French picked on Tony Armstrong but when Weller came she picked on him. I dont think the lad understood a word of English or French, so he couldnt understand what the crisis was about. He was shell shocked in more senses than one. It was great at Cockburn 1940-1945.

Date:
18-Mar-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Susan Ewens (nee Folbigg)

Comment:
What a marvellous school Cockburn must have been! I almost wish I had been there myself, though I have no complaints about the new high school, Parklands, which is where my parents chose to send me. It opened in 1958 with four classes of 11 year-olds as the first intake. I notice the mention of a Miss Bartle as a French teacher at Cockburn, above. I attended Cross Flatts Park School nursery, infants and juniors from 1951 to 1958 when I went to Parklands. A Miss Bartle was Head Mistress of the Girls Juniors at Cross Flatts until she retired in 1957 or 1958. Would it have been the same Miss Bartle - a very "stout" silver-haired lady who always wore quite voluminous but smart "costumes" (skirt + matching jacket) Perhaps it was her sister? I can remember seeing her on occasion after school walking down Trentham Street towards Dewsbury Road, maybe just to catch the bus or maybe to meet up with pals from Cockburn? I also remember seeing Mr Verity, the butcher's daughter, dawdling home every day up Dewsbury Road with her boyfriend (who identified himself above), both in Cockburn Uniform while I was walking home on the same route from Cross Flatts with pals. We used to shout over the road "Give her kiss" to the pair of sweethearts. How rude! Really lovely reading all your stories. I now live on Cross Flatts Avenue just across the Park from my my old junior school, another fine building which is no more.

Date:
24-Mar-2013

Email:
ssnewens@aol.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Susan Ewens (nee Folbigg)

Comment:
What a marvellous school Cockburn must have been! I almost wish I had been there myself, though I have no complaints about the new high school, Parklands, which is where my parents chose to send me. It opened in 1958 with four classes of 11 year-olds as the first intake. I notice the mention of a Miss Bartle as a French teacher at Cockburn, above. I attended Cross Flatts Park School nursery, infants and juniors from 1951 to 1958 when I went to Parklands. A Miss Bartle was Head Mistress of the Girls Juniors at Cross Flatts until she retired in 1957 or 1958. Would it have been the same Miss Bartle - a very "stout" silver-haired lady who always wore quite voluminous but smart "costumes" (skirt + matching jacket) Perhaps it was her sister? I can remember seeing her on occasion after school walking down Trentham Street towards Dewsbury Road, maybe just to catch the bus or maybe to meet up with pals from Cockburn? I also remember seeing Mr Verity, the butcher's daughter, dawdling home every day up Dewsbury Road with her boyfriend (who identified himself above), both in Cockburn Uniform while I was walking home on the same route from Cross Flatts with pals. We used to shout over the road "Give her kiss" to the pair of sweethearts. How rude! Really lovely reading all your stories. I now live on Cross Flatts Avenue just across the Park from my my old junior school, another fine building which is no more.

Date:
24-Mar-2013

Email:
ssnewens@aol.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
JOAN HAYES

Comment:
I went to this school till 1980, Mr Starbuck was still headmaster then & was still very scary. The gym was on the top floor next too the senior mistress's room, which l was found frequently. The basement was wood & metal work & the extention was sewing $ domestic science. The outside toilets were still being used by both boys & girls, but mostly for smoking. Burton house was used for music then & if l remember rightly the dinner halls were at the side. Happy days...

Date:
13-Apr-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Green

Comment:
It would be sad if Doc.Street was not mentioed. He was in charge of Physics and just before the war he started Cockburn Scout Troop. My brother was one of tha group he took camping in Borrowdale in 1939. Allthe tents had to be painted for camoflage. I was in the Scouts in 1941 and he took the Scouts Youth Hostelling. By train to Bell Busk and then to Malham Y.H.over the hills to Kettlewell and then on to Ascrigg. He then formed the Air Training Corp, Which we joined and our first weeks camp was at Doncaster, a grass drome. We coudnt wait to fly, first in a Hampden, two engined monoplane, obsolascent bomber,then in a Whitley bomber and then in a Dakota,used for parachuting with a wooden seats down both sides and a static line overhead ,down the middle. The guy took 33 cadets for a tour over Leeds and Cockburn. Doc. Steet and I had to stand ,clinging on to the static line next to the open door. When we banked and circled round Cockburn, we had a view straight donw into the playground. The following year we went to Pocklington which was home to a sqauadron of Halifax bobbers.The one fight we had, was in an Amnson and the guy took us down the coast over the sea. The air field had been shot up the previos week and the W.A.A.f. who issued us with our parachutes, was in tears. Her friend had died at that deesk in the raid.

Date:
14-Apr-2013

Email:
rmgreen14@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Green

Comment:
In 1942 we had Iron Harry for metal work and wood work. I was asked to dig for victory over at Burton House so I missed out. Pop Welbourne asked me to plant the potatoes in his garden. I wanted to go on Harvest Camp organised by Mr. Taylor in Knaresbrough. I didnt have a bike and that was vitally nessecery. Mr Welbourne spoke up for me, they arranged to have me work at Scriven which was in walking distance from our camp.The following year I had a bike and I worked with Alwyn Thompson at Scotton.

Date:
20-Apr-2013

Email:
rmgreen14@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
mr C cloggs

Comment:
for those who dont know where abouts this was, heres the scene in 2013. https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=Burton+Road,+Leeds&hl=en&ll=53.777426,-1.54486&spn=0.0009,0.001742&sll=53.764949,-1.519547&sspn=0.325917,0.891953&oq=burton+road+&t=h&hnear=Burton+Rd,+Leeds,+West+Yorkshire,+United+Kingdom&z=20&layer=c&cbll=53.777471,-1.544858&panoid=21LcOpMmN_JBHjx0XKAang&cbp=12,95.43,,0,3.19

Date:
24-May-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Steve Hallas 1961-1966

Comment:
Great to read all these comments, but sad to find nothing from 61-66 Teachers Names: Mr Fitton, Miss Wigglesworth, Miss Cooper(Art) - I still love her, Miss Crowther(geography(,Mr Rhodes( maths), Mr Smith (history?) and of course TEN Starbuck and Rocky Rockcliffe (deputy head). The long walk to the sports field and the almost complete segregation of boys and girls. Living in Belle Isle. Not many grammar school kids found there then. Memories of walking home with a girl a little older than me, I had a complete crush on her- Margaret Valentine Chapman. The school motto 100% right - not for school but for life. Great photo. Great memories.

Date:
26-May-2013

Email:
Stevehallas@live.couk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Jean (Fisher) Armitage

Comment:
I haven't looked at this site for a while but I've just spent half an hour catching up. I remember Mr Owens from my first year in 1A in 1959/60. He was the most scary teacher I ever came across, and yes, he did throw the board rubber and chalk at pupils. However, the best memory I have of him was when he bounced into our form room one day, thinking the bell for change of lesson had gone. It hadn't, and in his usual fashion he threw his briefcase on the table at the front and then realised that Miss Pickles was standing at the desk looking, well, I'm not sure, somewhere between terror and confusion. It was hard not to laugh. I don't recall what he said, just that he picked up his briefcase and exited as quickly as he had arrived.

Date:
13-Jul-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Jean Armitage (Fisher)

Comment:
For those of you from my era (1959 to 1966)I put some photos on Friends Reunited quite some time ago. There is a staff photo (lots of whom are mentioned here), prefects photo and 6A1 class photo from 1965. Also other photos of The Mikado (1963) and The Gondoliers (1965)

Date:
20-Jul-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Michael McMullan

Comment:
It looks rather grim in this B/W not at all as in my memory.I thought it was a fine ,bright place of learning and was quite suprised when i saw the school had moved.

Date:
09-Oct-2013

Email:
shore_200@hotmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Lesley Cox (nee Yates)

Comment:
I also remember the old Cockburn and attended from 1973 to 1976 and I remember been in Mr Parker's class 3P and 4P, we actually nicknamed the building the Towers of Colditz. Mr Smith would probably have remembered myself and my friend Gillian Pearson (who's father ran the New Inn pub on Dewsbury Road), as I do believe we were the first girls ever to take woodwork (in the basement) which Mr Smith took. Mr Smith at that time was rather a large man and use to drive an MG Midget sports car, that had a soft top. Other teachers I remember Mr Starbuck (Headteacher), the Headmistress was Mrs Thelma Zachary (who gained instant fame after appearing on the BBC TV programme Bruce Forsythe's Generation Game with her son (even though she didn't win); Miss Milner, Mrs Cheryl Catlow (as she was then, I do believe she remarried), Mr Gosling (RE) and Mr Pallister (Art); but my favourite teacher was indeed Bill Rhodes (Maths) - who I actually really admired, as he had lots of time for me, as I was really interested in Maths and he gave me a lot of extra time and advanced tuition and was impressed when I refused to use a calculator and when he asked me why, I told him that if I did, it would make my brain lazy. He was really a great man, and he also did not suffer fools gladly. With those pupils who would not listen in class, he would just carry on and if asked after class by those who did not listen in his class to explain what he wanted or how to do a particular task....his reply would be 'You should have been listening, shouldn't you', but Bill Rhodes was a great man and I was very shocked and saddened that he had passed away. His influence and teachings influenced my own life in gaining a BA (Hons) degree from Leeds University in Business Management and I'm sure influenced many others into other professional career paths. I also wanted the best for my son, and sent him to Cockburn (at the Parkside site), thinking that my son could not be in better hands academically than with Mr Rhodes. I have great admiration, respect and great memories of Mr Rhodes and was very saddened to read of his death. Anyway, back to the old Cockburn...Mid way through my attendance, they started building the 6th form block and I remember this modern building looking completely out of character with the rest of the building. Yes, we did make use of Burton House for music and I remember after the class snooping around where they use to store drama and other things on the top floor. Im now in my mid 50s, and I have very fond memories of my time at Cockburn with my friends Debra Hayes, Deborah Lythe, Pauline Oates, Mandy Barker, Marion Downie, Michelle, Susan and Sheila.

Date:
02-Nov-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Lesley McIntee (nee Rhodes)

Comment:
Just had to say thanks to Lesley Cox for the wonderful comments about Bill Rhodes, who was my father. It would amuse you to know he was just like that at home too - he was never a harsh parent but absolutely would comment if I "should have been listening" - and I'm proud of being able to do the maths without a calculator too. It's nice to know that he had an influence, the chain of which continues today, when his ex pupils like yourself pass those things along to the next generation.

Date:
11-Dec-2013

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Philip Walton

Comment:
My father attended Cockburn back in the 40s. Dad claimed that Peter O'Toole attended the school and was his senior by one year. Many net sources deny that O'Toole attended the school. I'm not sure why my father would lie about this? Does anyone know whether O'Toole attended the school even if only briefly?

Date:
16-Dec-2013

Email:
walton.phil@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Dave Arthurs

Comment:
A very sad day when Bob Newton passed away. He taught me to look in the opposite direction if there was trouble on the Boys staircase

Date:
16-Jan-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Frances Hainsworth nee West

Comment:
On the subject of Bill Rhodes I have to say that if it hadn't been for him and his infinite patience I would not have passed my Maths 'O' level...it took me three attempts but Bill had faith even if I didn't.

Date:
26-Jan-2014

Email:
fghainsworth@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Alan Wood

Comment:
Les Williams was one of the PE teachers there. He played for Parkside Rugby League in those days. My favourite teacher ever was Mr. Fielding who taught Geography. I really liked Pauline Hutchinson; she was a redhead in 1952-53

Date:
24-Apr-2014

Email:
papou.alan@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
jayne clayton ( nee atkinson )

Comment:
oh my god hated travelling to moor grange high school ,remember all the coaches lined up every morning. and then had to travel back every day ,went on for sometime.had a right laugh with the pupils we loved asking mr mowinney what the time was. he would stretch his harm right out and put his wrist upto his face lol.and mrs catlow the PE teacher and mr white im pretty sure they were flirting lol always together. have loads of good memories at cockburn,pablo hahaha mr phillips he was my first form teacher.

Date:
27-Apr-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Walker

Comment:
It was my pleasure,to meet Mr.Green,(Who had been my first form induction teacher),many Years later,at Cromford Steam Rally,Matlock,Derbyshire,where my Company had a trade stand.-I have happy memories of my time at Cockburn,and I send my Best Wishes to anyone who remembers me,from the 1965 to 1970 era.

Date:
12-Jun-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Jill

Comment:
Does anyone have any information on Mrs Jean Gosling- English teacher in the 1970's. it would be great to get in touch with her. I know she divorced so is likely to have a different surname if she remarried. Thanks

Date:
27-Jul-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Walker

Comment:
Ah yes Jayne, -Mr.Mawhinney, a name from the past,the Eamonn Holmes of Cockburn, I remember him with slightly less affection than you, as I received a hefty "clout" around the back of my head from him,in a lesson. He was a bit free with his demonstrative actions,Didn't have the good standards of people like Bob Newton,-I would like to meet him again,to remember old pleasant times !!!

Date:
10-Sep-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Nick Smith

Comment:
In 2011 you were wondering what became of John Nettleship (Chemistry). I am an old pupil of West Bromwich Grammar School ('62 -'69), and that is where I met him, and got into jazz because of him. I was not a science man, though. The Nettleship in Wales is the selfsame man, and it was only because I was told about the Harry Potter connection at my school association AGM the other day that I found out that he'd died. How strange that he was in Leeds, which is where my wife is from (Chapel Allerton of a million visits). A massive article (madasafish.com) called "John Nettleship - A True Original" has many pictures. Just to let you know. Cheers from the West Midlands.

Date:
09-Oct-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
Thankyou, Nick Smith,for your comments and very informative link to the late John Nettleship. I can see now from the many photographs that he was indeed the person who taught us at Cockburn High School around the early 1960s. I can also see that my early perception of him as a very nervous type fits some of the characterisation (and even more, that this masked some more complex qualities). However, I am still mystified that his time at Cockburn High School (a high performing South Leeds Grammar School) remains unacknowledged. The 'South Leeds comprehensive school' referred to could possibly have been Parkside Secondary Modern - was this pre or post Cockburn, I wonder? Also, is it possible that Mr Nettleship left Cockburn under some kind of a cloud, given that it is unreferenced? Christine Hebenton

Date:
13-Oct-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
I was very interested to read Ian Ingram's comments on what he recognises, and interprets as 'streaming'. I was at Cockburn from 1950 to 1955, and I have to say, that the the concept of 'streaming' never occurred to us at that time. As far as we all were concerned, the only reason that we had got there, was because we had passed our "11Plus" exam. However, looking back to my Primary School days at Cross Flatts Park School does remind me of how, when we moved up from the infant's school, half of us were put into classes bearing an even number in the title, while the other half were put into classes bearing an odd number. As to how that particular segregation was determined, I do not know. The classes were listed as, Junior 2, 4, 6, 8, and Junior 1,3,5,7. Junior 8/7 was the year in which we all took the exam. It was well recognised that most of all the pupils in Junior 8 always passed, whereas all, with the exception of the odd one occasionally, in Junior 7 would not. - - - They would go up into what was referred to as 'The Seniors'. It is interesting to note that there were only three classes then; Senior 1, 2, & 3. That says a lot!!! No need for any other classes, as half of the pupils had left, and gone on to higher education. Back then we had approximately 39 to 42 boys in each class. I mention this in order to point out that each year, about 40 boys would pass their '11+'. In addition to that, there were the girls. I can't comment on their situation, but I imagine that something similar was in operation in their section of the school. I mention all this, as it has a bearing on Ian Ingram's comment. A short while back, I was talking to some old friends who had been in the same year as myself at Cockburn. The conversation got around to how good our education been during our time there. I happened to say that we had been very lucky to go to what was still regarded by many as an excellent Grammar School, and that in some respects were had been privileged to get there. This last remark was met with some derision. However, I pointed out, that if you stopped to think about it - - - we were!!! I explained it this way:- Our classes were mixed. Perhaps not 50/50 but not far off, and there were around about an average total of 27 pupils per class. Each year's classes were divided into 'forms', First year - Form 1, second year, Form 2, and so on as far as Form 5. After that it was just The Sixth Form. Each form was divided into sub-forms:- Alpha - Form A - Form B - Form C. Now if you bear in mind that each class had an average of 27 pupils, this means that Cockburn's intake of pupils each year was approximately only 108. In my 'year' there were quite a few from Cross Flatts, but there were others from various parts of Leeds. Even back then, Leeds had a large population. Statistics I have been able to find, tell me that the population of Leeds in and around 1950 was, 1,414,000. I have been unable to find any figures relating to the number of pupils in Leeds of "11+" age in and around 1950. So, all I can say, is that out of the total population of Leeds in that year, only 108 (approx.) ie:-0.008% of them enrolled at Cockburn that year. That percentage in itself can be regarded as the first indication of the high status Cockburn must have been held in. If someone is able to supply the Leeds birth-rate for 1939, that would help to give a very near estimate as to a realistic ratio. There would have been an average of say 100 to 110 places ONLY, available at Cockburn each year. What mechanism's wheels turned in order to select names? Were similar wheels turning at all levels throughout the educational system??? I think that Ian Ingram has raised a very good point.

Date:
18-Oct-2014

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
Graham, with regard to 'streaming' in infant schools, at our school it seemed to be based on date of birth - children born early in the school year were placed separately to those born later. As there is a recognised educational disadvantage for later born children when taking school exams, this could be the reason for your 'even numbered' group being more academically successful. With regard to the streaming at Cockburn, initial selection would probably have been based on the 11+ range of marks. When I was there, pupils were transferred between streams based on their end of year exam results.

Date:
21-Oct-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Mark Gregory

Comment:
I can claim to be the very last Grammar School pupil at Cockburn Grammar School. I was part of the final 1971 Grammar intake with Mick Speke and Karen Lickley above. I should have left after A-levels in 1978 but having spent the last year performing Deputy Head Boy duties, and much more time than we should have in the Blooming Rose... I did not get the grades that I should have and was asked by Mr Starbuck if I wanted to retake y A-levels in 1979. I took him up on this offer and was there to see him retire at Christmas 1978 to be replaced my Mr Robinson. When we joined the school in 1978 the intake classes were not streamed but had class suffixes of 1P, 1R, and 1S to reflect the form teachers surnames (Pickles, Robinson and Smith). We were then streamed at the end of the first year to 2A, 2B1, and 2B2. When the Comprehensive stream joined they were always (until the last grammar stream passed into the 6th form in 1976) xC1,xC2,xC3,XC4. Once we had passed into 6A1/6A2 the classes were then renamed to reflect the form teachers name I believe. Mr Starbuck promised our parents that we would receive a Grammar School education and he promised them he would see us through to graduation from Cockburn. He took me into his Office in October 1978 and was apologetic that he could not keep that promise.... I was very touched that he remembered his promise and also that he actually cared enough to apologise. He did find the school being comprehensive very difficult. I owe Cockburn a great deal... The life of my family and that of their families is so much better because I received that offer of 'a fully paid scholarship at Cockburn Grammar School.' Thank you to all the staff named above and to all the school community for making Cockburn the great school that it was.

Date:
26-Oct-2014

Email:
mark_s_gregory@hotmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to Christine Hebenton's response to the "streaming" theory. Many thanks for your input, Christine. Your suggestion that actual birth-dates played a part could well be creditable - - - but were the educational authorities fully aware of that possible effect, way back in the 'War Years'? You appear to have misunderstood me on one point however. I agree with you fully, on how we were positioned within the 'form structure' at Cockburn - - - Internal exam results did determine whether you went up - down - or stayed where you were. However, I was following up on Ian Ingram's concept of possible streaming in order to gain entry into Cockburn in the first place. Surely there would have been several hundreds of children passing the 11+ exam in Leeds each year, and there would have been many with similar 'result percentages'. So, out of all those:- who, or what decided which children were to form part of the relatively small group of "100 plus" and allowed access to Cockburn. I doubt that it was done on the throw of a dice. Will an explanation ever be forthcoming???

Date:
27-Oct-2014

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
Graham, thanks for your comments re 'streaming'. I would like to add that at Dewsbury Road CP school, the infants were divided into 2 classes as I said and this continued until we went into the Junior School at age 7. At this point, the genders were separated off to opposite ends of the school and this then allowed for a mixing together of the two classes (all now girls or all boys). Our Junior stages, until age 11, therefore consisted of a single class of around 40 girls. I believe that Cross Flatts CP had a larger number of pupils, requiring a continuation of 2 classes and that therefore some selection by ability probably occurred at your Junior stage (streaming). With regard to initial streaming by ability at grammar school, of course some arbitrary decisions were possibly made, not least due to the 'marking up' of boys at the 11+ because of a recognised developmental lag (quite a number of girls were denied grammar school places because of this practice). All in all, it does pose a huge question mark over selection by ability at such a young age. At Cockburn, some people were transferred from secondary modern schools at 13 to grammar schools although it was not always a happy transition for them as they had missed so much.

Date:
28-Oct-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Frances Hainsworth

Comment:
I do know that in my first year we were streamed according to marks obtained in the 11plus exams and after that internal exam results were used to decide which stream you entered. As to the choice of which grammar school we would attend if successful in the 11plus I remember my parents filling in a form stating which school they would wish me to attend, I remember having some input and chose Lawnswood as my first choice, we lived in Beeston so that wasn't going to happen, then as now there was a catchment area for each school.

Date:
03-Nov-2014

Email:
fghainsworth@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Darryl Johnson

Comment:
Very interesting stuff about Mr Nettleship. Not being a "Potterite" I had no idea of his celebrity. I wonder if anyone can help me with a recollection? Was it Mr Nettleship or another chemistry teacher whose name, I think was Mr Apperley, that was banned from the chemistry labs for a period after he had mishandled phosphorous or some other nasty chemical and burnt his hands. I remember attending one of his lessons in the chemistry lecture theatre soon after the event. Mr N or Mr A had both hands comically bandaged in huge dressings. It was bizarre. Perhaps someone could help me with the identity of the ungloved boxer who taught me that day? Mr Apperley was from the West Country and used to intone that magnesium burnt with a "broit, woit loit". Of course, we with our sophisticated south Leeds accents, found this hilarious and for a while it became something of a catchphrase. Concerning recent musings on the pre-streaming of 11 plus pupils. It's an interesting question as to the arbitary selection of qualified students and I have no real theories. Although, I'm pretty sure that Frances Heberton's comment regarding catchment areas for the various grammar schools is right. I remember the choices form that she refres to well. For me it was a no-brainer because Cockburn was nearest and it played football rather than rugby. Perhaps the number of places was proportionate to the size of individual primary schools, with each having a quota? I'm not sure of the exact figures but in J12 (top stream class) at Middleton County Primary, where I went, 24 out of 42 pupils (incredible class size!) passed and went to grammar school. 22 of them went to Cockburn and I think the other 2 went to West Leeds or was it Central? That fairly high number was a tribute to a daily rote learning programme of Maths (am) and English (pm) along with a series of mock exams focusing on "intelligence" questions such as 'If takes 4 men three days to dig a ditch 4 yards long …". About every six weeks or so 'Pop' Lacey our form master would let us do a bit of painting for an afternoon but then we were back to the cramming. Middleton was one of, if not the biggest schools in the catchment area so it could have been more the law of averages that we should produce a relatively high number of pupils? I should add that, as Middleton's juniors were segregated, I'm only talking about boys. I have no idea how many girls went from the girl's side in 1958? At the time, I don't think I knew what a girl was.

Date:
28-Nov-2014

Email:
darrylj100@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Darryl Johnson

Comment:
I seem to have mixed up my Hebentons (or even Hebertons - my own invention!) with my Hainsworths. Apologies to both ladies. That's what comes of believing your mind and memory are still pretty good for an old geezer. How very far from reality.

Date:
28-Nov-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
It seems that the "streaming theory", is generating some interest. Following on, as it were, I would like to pick up on one of Frances Hainsworth's points. Yes, I think that most of us would agree that our First Year positions at Cockburn would have been, in the main, determined by the marks of our 11+ exam results. After all, they were the most positive thing that Cockburn would have had to go on. After that, the school's own standards kicked in, and all future class allocations were based on shall we say, more comprehensive principles. However! I can't fully agree with Frances's assumption that living in Beeston but a block on her being given a place at Lawnswood. I have to agree that Beeston, and its environs must have been a major catchment area:- An old school photograph tells me that my class, Junior 8, at Cross Flatts Primary, sent around 30 lads to Cockburn, in 1950. There were also quite a lot of girls, but I do not know their number. There were also children from Holbeck, Hunslet, Middleton, Belle Isle, etc.. - - - districts which could easily be understood to be within a "South Leeds Catchment Area". I would imagine that the majority of children sent to Cockburn in 1950 were from South Leeds. Darryl Johnson tells us that he recalls there being 22 lads plus an unknown number of girls going to Cockburn from his school, Middleton County Primary, in 1958. Just for argument's sake, let's say that Cross Flatts Primary, and Middleton Primary, sent an average mixed total of 75 boys and girls each year, and that Cockburn's yearly average intake would be somewhere between 110 to 120, we can see that two South Leeds Schools alone could have made up at least 60% of that intake. With several other South Leeds School yet to enter the equation, we can easily see that Frances Hainsworth's supposition holds plenty of water. However. It has to be said that there were also children from the other side of the city -Burmantofts, Headingley, etc., who were given places at Cockburn, - - - showing that there was a two-way flow - - - if only a trickle. Yes, the opportunity was there for Frances to gain access to Lawnswood, but the same scenario would have been played out there, as it would have been in Beeston and South Leeds; - - - ie:- Lawnswood children would have had more 'clout' - they were in the majority. This begs the question:- Who or what, decided on which children from other parts of the city were selected to go on to a particular - 'distant' - "Higher Education School"? - - - What parameters were in place? - - - Did Boards of Governors have a say? - - - I cast my mind back to what Ian Ingram puts forward, in his comment, above. Was there an accepted pattern? Did the 'Authorities' have their own agenda? Were we all being "manipulated" ??? If we could transport ourselves back to those times, would we detect, or perhaps be smothered by the unsavoury whiff of "Class" and "Privilege" polluting the corridors of power?

Date:
08-Dec-2014

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
I find Graham's last post a bit too Orwellian....at our CP school only a small number passed the 11+ (under 10 girls and maybe similar for boys). The majority of girls opted for Cockburn and went there, the remainder went to Thorsby. The main reasons for going to Cockburn were to do with proximity and other siblings going there and also because they wanted to be with their friends. The main reason why girls, or their parents, might opt for another school was because they preferred a single sex environment and Thorsby was the closest. To opt for Roundhay, West Leeds or Lawnswood would have seemed bizarre in terms of the travel time and expenses, as well as safety issues for girls. I am talking about the 1950s here - in that period, people didn't think in terms of one grammar school being 'better' than another in the same way that they might evaluate schools now as external criteria were not available for such judgments. The only school (for girls) where there was a recognised different category was Leeds Girls High School with its separate examination - but few people wanted to put themselves through that ordeal. So, although we know that there were, and still are, class differences between areas in Leeds which became very important after comprehensivisation of schools, I am firmly of the opinion that self-selection was the main driver behind grammar school allocation.

Date:
10-Dec-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Awh! Surely not too Orwellian, Christine. Perhaps the view on the left hand side of one's vision is always clearer than if one looks to the right. Let's not forget, that although George's rather overpowering, and dismal predictions did not materialise, and we all found ourselves free from what might have been the potential horrors of his vision of "1984", we are all finding ourselves in a world in which his vision, although perhaps much watered down, is gradually materialising: - - - I never saw electronic eyes watching me when I was growing up!

Date:
28-Dec-2014

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
Well Graham, your last sentence seems to negate what you were saying in your previous posts! So I don't quite know what your position is with regard to surveillance and manipulation - but never mind, Happy New Year to you and other Old Cockburnians!

Date:
31-Dec-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Not in the least, Christine. Nothing is that 'cut and dry. The arts of Surveillance and Manipulation were there, back in those days, as they have always been from the beginning of time, - but not "Orwellian". It was the old 'Class System' in all its forms, that still held the reins of power back then, - firmly entrenched, - and more or less inviolate. In many way it was painless; the general population didn't always notice it, because everyone, "Knew Their Place".

Date:
02-Jan-2015

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Alan Watson

Comment:
Cockburn HS 1949-53 I passed my 11 plus exam in 1948 and went to Cockburn High School in 1949 until I got permission to leave at age 15 to take up an apprenticeship in the printing trade. As it worked out everything went very well for me. I attended Cockburn till we broke up for the Christmas Holidays just before my 15th birthday on 23rd December. It must have been December 1953. I went in the R.A.F. Intelligence Service for 2 years 56-58 and on Demob I got married in 1959 and we bought a bungalow in Cookridge Leeds 16 moving in during 1961. We lived in Yeadon Horsforth and Yeadon again before I re-located to Norfolk in 1997. As far as Cockburn goes the Black gowned Mr Sutcliffe was the head master I remember. I remember Miss Milner Miss Pickles (French), Mr Thomson, who threw everything he could get his hands on at the pupils (Me included). The only pupils I remember from my Dim and Distant past were Michael Hobson Barry Surs (who used to give updates etc on Hunslet matches with Radio Leeds. I was in 4D when I left C.M.S. My class like the rest of the school in those days was mixed. Cockburn was completely Co Ed. Pat Kinder, Maria, Marion (Surnames ?). We used to use the Gym for the Xmas Form Parties. I can remember Maria as I asked her to accompany me to this dance one year. The dancing was old Tyme Military 2 Step etc. Others whom I remember but were either older or younger were Jimmy Rhodes, Philip Rushton and Alan Rae. I'm pretty sure I knew Graham Schofield as he seems to have been there when I was. I've already been in touch with Harry Slater who told me his brother Arthur had died about 3 years ago. They both went to Cross Flatts Park C.P. where I used to go. I was in Senior 1 when I passed my 11 plus. An almost unheard of occurrence. Philip Rushton passed from Junior 8 (one of the stream classes). When I was 50 my wife and I went back to Cockburn and Tempest Road as I used to live near the Cockburn High School Sports Fields where I spent hours and hours playing Cricket, Soccer and Rugby. I recall Les Williams fixing up a league game of Rugby for us against St Josephs I believe. I crossed the St J line 4 times yet never scored a point. I was a dumb dumb at Sports yet I still love Rugby League and am a big Rhinos fan. I haven't heard from anyone at school since we left the Yorkshire home except for Alan rae who now lives in Pudsey and is also a Rhinos fan. I and the boys frequently drank in Tommy Wass's pub in Dewsbury Road as my pals dad was the Landlord there for a while. My pals name was Mick Kershaw and his dad left to take over the White Swan (Mucky Duck) in Leeds City Centre. I've not heard from him since. His cousin was called Pete Colley. Other close friends of mine were Johnny Holmes Gordon Lazenby and Malcolm Webster as well as Michael Wigglesford who died in his 20s.

Date:
03-Jan-2015

Email:
radgedpress@fastmail.fm

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
nick watson

Comment:
does anyone have any other photos of the school that they can get posted to leodis? this is the only one i cd find on the web

Date:
04-Jan-2015

Email:
radgedpress@fastmail.fm

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
So now we have another theory from Graham about how we all ended up at Cockburn: we elected to go there because we 'Knew Our Place'. There seems to be an underlying assumption that our school was somehow inferior to those that were in the more leafy suburbs of Leeds. I would question whether any of us on here really think that and wonder what advantages Graham feels he would have had by travelling to the other side of Leeds to be in a more middle-class environment. To my mind, all these grammar schools offered the same educational opportunities to the top 25% of the pupil population. It's the 75% who did not have access to those opportunities that one should be more concerned about. As for social class issues, there is such a thing as 'solidarity' - as an 11 year old I would definitely have preferred to have been educated alongside children I was familiar with from my own community rather than hiking across Leeds into a different milieu. Although there were some aspects of Cockburn that were not to my liking, I never had a problem with the pupil population nor do I feel that my subsequent career was hindered by going there.

Date:
05-Jan-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Oh, dear, oh dear, oh dear!!! Christine, you have completely misinterpreted what I have said. I made no reference whatsoever to the school system, in my last comment. I was pointing towards how the firmly entrenched 'Class System' still controlled people's lives back then. The "Everyone Knew Their Place" phrase was a 'tongue-in-cheek' reminder of the humorous and famous Ronnie Barker - Ronnie Corbett - John Cleese TV. sketch from the mid-1960's. On the subject of 'school':- Nowhere have I put forward a ridiculous theory that kids went to Cockburn because we all knew our place. We found ourselves there because "The Authorities" put us there. If you read my comments, you will see that that is the basis of my conjecture, and if you go back up the list of comments to where Ian Ingram has written, you will see that I am in some agreement with what he says, and have tentatively elaborated and explored his argument. With regard to Cockburn. It was a damn good school, and if you take the time to look back through the many comments here, you will find that I have always championed its status as a "Grammar School", and I question why it had to disappear, and lose that status. Forget the word, 'ASBESTOS'. - - - Think, 'POLITICS'.

Date:
07-Jan-2015

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
It lost its educational status, Graham, because 75% of the pupil population were consigned to an educational netherworld. If, as you are now appearing to revert to the argument about the Authorities as having 'put us there', perhaps some might think this more applicable to that larger population who really did have no choice AT ALL. (Just in case people are wondering, Graham & I are on quite amicable terms despite our differences in this site!)

Date:
07-Jan-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
I Hampshire

Comment:
Cockburn lost its grammar school status long before its closure in 83, asbestos being clumsily blown round the building during the boiler replacement via the forced air heating system was the reason for its closure not politics.

Date:
07-Jan-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Walker

Comment:
Oh Dear ! -As that great Orator,Michael Winner said, "Calm Down Dear"! -Although, I do remember that early on,in my First Form (1B-1965) attendance, it was impressed upon me, that my old school friends were "in the past", and I was encouraged to be with "my own".-Eliteism ?-Too Highbrow for me.Just make Music!

Date:
07-Jan-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Frances Hainsworth

Comment:
Cats and pigeons come to mind! When I made my comment about choosing Lawnswood as my preferred grammar school I was stating an 11 year olds preference and most of my friends at Cross Flatts put down Lawnswood as their first choice too. The only one who actually went to Lawnswood moved to the area before 11+! I was a girl with very little contact with boys so perhaps that is why I wanted to go to a single-sex school, having said that I enjoyed my 7 years at Cockburn immensely and boys weren't a problem!!!

Date:
10-Jan-2015

Email:
fghainsworth@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Darryl Johnson

Comment:
Regarding the nicely heated selection/allocation debate. I had always supposed that in bygone days, when working class and most lower middle class families did not have cars and were reliant, therefore, on public transport, that it would have been quite natural for pupils, parents and authorities to have thought locally. I don't think I, or my parents, would have considered it worthwhile to trek to Leeds Modern or some posher institution just for the social cachet. As has been observed, most Cockburnians came from South Leeds. Doubtless, most of the successful 11 plus-ers from West Leeds went to the grammar school of the same name. I imagine the trend was replicated in other areas of the city? The biggest exception would have been those from the nether classes who were deemed worthy of attending Leeds Grammar School and the Girl's High School and given scholarships (by who knows what mysterious process?). However arcane or simple, the selection process actually was, we who found ourselves 'allowed' to go to Cockburn and the other grammar schools of the time can count ourselves very fortunate indeed. The affection expressed on this pleasant page shows that.

Date:
12-Jan-2015

Email:
darrylj100@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
Well, it's good that we all think we derived some benefit from our Grammar School education. However, before we get too cosy and congratulatory perhaps we might throw another 'cat among the pigeons' by considering some interesting historical statistics. In 1953/4 only 10.7% of the relevant age group passed 5 or more GCE 'O' Levels and 5.5% passed 1+ GCE 'A' Levels. In 1965/66 when Grammar Schools were at their peak (educating 25% of the pupil population in 1,285 such establishments) only around 18% achieved 5+ grades A-C. This means that the majority left Grammar School with around 3 'O' Levels. Interesting/acceptable outcomes?? There are now just 164 Grammar Schools left and I am sure you are aware of debates about their future (in fact, I was expecting Somebody on here to pitch in about this but they seem to have gone to ground). The Sutton Trust recently evaluated the performances of these remaining schools and found that they were stuffed full of middle class kids who had migrated there from the private sector. Pupils on Free School Meals took up 2.7% of places, compared with 16% in all secondary schools. The academic outcomes were slightly better than other types of secondary school but by less than a grade. So the implications for education policy are .........??

Date:
14-Jan-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
I would like take this opportunity to thank 'I. Hampshire' for drawing attention to the rather clumsily constructed, and thus misleading ending to my last comment, above. I was attempting to conclude, by pointing out, in the briefest way possible, the two important events which led to the demise of a once great institution, but impatience and over-enthusiasm stepped in. Too late, am I reminded of the old adages:- " Look before You Leap" and "Think Before You Speak". The wording should have been more comprehensible, and on the lines of:- [[[ " . . . . . . . . . It was a damn good school, and if you take the time to look back through the many comments here, you will find that I have always championed its status as a "Grammar School", and I question why it had to disappear, and lose that status. As in the past, there still are powerful political voices determined to eradicate the Grammar School ethos and destroy all its "centres of excellence'. - - - I know that it's a rhetorical question, - - - but WHY! - - - These voices of discontent grew strong during the Post-War Years, and as time unfolded, gained political 'clout'. The death of Cockburn as a grammar school, along with its own high standards was only one of their political broadsides that blasted into the education system in the early 1970's. The final straw for Cockburn was the destruction of the actual school building, itself, approximately twelve years or so later. 'Asbestos Contamination', can be cleaned up, so I personally would question that particular reason for the building's destruction. Cockburn's grammar school status had already been mortally wounded. Could this final act have been some political arm's, celebratory "Coup de Grâce"? ]]]

Date:
18-Jan-2015

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
I Hampshire

Comment:
Feel free to question the reason for the schools closure Graham but rest assured that the cost of the clear up as opposed to demolition was the thing that sealed its fate. A pile of asbestos here and there is one thing but having it blown around the building via the forced air heating system is another. I have it on good authority from one close to the action at that time, so to speak, that the reason is as mundane as that a building impregnated with fine asbestos dust, no hidden agendas no politics no "Reds under the bed" just simple economics.

Date:
19-Jan-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Darryl Johnson

Comment:
Christine’s statistical comments are interesting and I accept her cautionary note on the dangers of complacency regarding the merits of grammar school education which will be intensified with the inevitable nostalgia of old age. It would be nice to know how, in fair and accurate terms, the current system’s level of acceptable outcomes compare? I wouldn’t argue for turning back the clock but I don’t see why taking pleasure in a positive educational experience, which was a product of the system of the time, should engender a sense of guilt? Speaking as a pigeon, I can look Christine’s feline in the eye and say I still feel OK about myself (rapid wing movement).

Date:
21-Jan-2015

Email:
darrylj100@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Vern

Comment:
I didn't attend Cockburn - although I wanted to - but have followed the comments here over the years as many of my classmates left from Hugh Gaitskell and went to Cockburn in 1976. My last year at Miggy C of E was the year that the 11+ was abolished (1972-3), so I started Hugh Gaitskell in the 2nd year, aged 10. The middle school system then was for ages 9 - 13. In 1976, under enormous maternal pressure, I took the entrance exam for Leeds Grammar School, and passed it, but refused point blank to go there. I had no wish to leave my friends in South Leeds and to be honest thought I'd hate being a Miggy council estate lad at a "posh" school. So the deal was my mother chose City of Leeds because she'd had friends there when it was Leeds Central/Thoresby, even though I wanted to go to Cockburn. The Secretary Of State for Education in 1971, one M. H. Thatcher, was responsible for abolishing the grammar schools, but the previous Wilson Labour government would have done the same. Graham, there was nothing more sinister to it than that (although some would say Thatcher was as sinister as was needed..). Ironically, when I left Leeds for Cornwall aged 14 the 11+ was still in place and remained so until 1980, and my place at the local grammar school there was dependent on good exam results in my first year. I can state that my education in Leeds was excellent and I don't believe for a second that if I'd taken my O and A levels there that I wouldn't have gone on to Uni, and I know of many who started Cockburn in the 70s who did so.

Date:
22-Jan-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
chris beaumont

Comment:
Living in Spain now since 2004 and when I tell people I was educated at CHS in Leeds they think my parents were well minted. The fact is that the majority of the pupils that were educated there were ordinary kids that were hungry for knowledge. I still am ,in 5 months I will be a pensioner I would like to say to "Sam " Hall as from Miggy thanks for your help with Ian p bisby you can contact me on bobolv69@hotmail .com Wot a football team we had.Love you all

Date:
25-Feb-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
J Barnfather

Comment:
Both me and my father went to Cockburn ( different years )! Good times despite some manic teachers. One of these comments asked of the name of the immaculately dressed indian maths teacher in the 1970's, his name was Mr Pannu. The large gym down stairs became the woodwork and metal working area, whilst the halls on the 2nd and third floors became the gyms., around 1973. My father was a teacher at the time around the corner in Bewerley Street with Mr Blakborough see elsewhere in Leodis.

Date:
13-Apr-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
I hampshire.

Comment:
I remember Mr Barnfather with fondness, not only was he an excellent teacher but a kind and decent human being towards his charges as well.

Date:
17-Apr-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
donald rhodes

Comment:
Although I was born and? Educated in south leeds,Rowland to be precise,I often look at the chs on leodis.however,,now having lived in Melbourne for 28 years I am often amused by the many references to classes in leeds and maybe the uk in general. Just hw many classes are they in england? Iv'e seen upper,middle,middle lower,low,working the list seems endless to me here in oz,all mentioned on leodis.

Date:
20-Apr-2015

Email:
donrhodes@pac.com.au

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Brian Robinson

Comment:
I should like to clarify some of my comments on CHS made in June 2012. Here I gave 1907 as the opening date for the school, which, strictly speaking, is incorrect. The new ‘Cockburn Schools’ opened in 1902, named after the retiring chairman of the Leeds school Board, Sir George Cockburn. School Boards nationally were abolished in 1902 and replaced by local education authorities (LEAs) of county and borough councils. Cockburn at its beginning had a majority of primary age pupils and far fewer secondary ones. All the purely elementary schools around took pupils from 5 to 13. In 1902 Cockburn moved to Burton Road from its Bewerley Street site under its Head, Mr Wallace, and was described in the opening ceremony as a ‘Higher Grade’ school. The term ‘secondary’ was not used in the 1902 Education Act which allowed for the provision of ‘other than elementary’ education in certain schools, including higher grade schools. This was to avoid any conflict of interest with the existing ancient grammar schools ( i.e. Leeds and Bradford varieties) providing secondary education and then exerting a powerful influence, as they still do today. In fact I believe my own grandma went to a south Leeds higher grade school in the 1890s, costing 9d a week in fees (4p in present money). This is a useful reminder that a Cockburn education up to 1945 required the payment of fees for the majority of pupils. But in 1902 it was not the Cockburn High School as we knew it. Why it was ever called a High School, like Roundhay High and West Leeds High, when it gave a grammar school education, is not at all clear. Most likely again it was in deference to the ancient Leeds Grammar School, independent and governed by different rules, and it might not have welcomed such competition from within the city. These new twentieth century creations were sometimes called Municipal High or Secondary schools, being run by the Leeds Education Committee from Calverley Street and, later, the Civic Hall. Cockburn and the like are certainly not to be confused with the much later Comprehensive High Schools, taking all pupils from local Middle Schools at age 13.The English education system is littered with the names of various school types, which can be misleading now we have not only the previous names but academies and free schools as well.

Date:
21-May-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Brian Robinson

Comment:
1907 thus sees the beginning of the real Cockburn High School under three influences. The first measure for a free secondary education from age 11 came in that year, when it was decreed that the new local education authority should offer at least 25% of its high school places free in the form of scholarships to pupils from all the local elementary schools. My own elementary school class of those reaching the age of 11 had 50 pupils but only 6 were put in for the scholarship. 2 passed. When I started Cockburn on a Junior City scholarship in the early 1940s my family had both a maintenance grant and a clothing grant so it was in practice a free place although the official letter said it was a ‘special place in a Higher Institution’. There was also a form for parents to complete, agreeing to repay some costs if the pupil left before the end of that secondary education at 16. By then the scholarship winners accounted for 40% of the intake of 150. The fees then seemed very low to us nowadays - 7 guineas a term, but even this was beyond many working class families in south Leeds. Secondly in 1907 Cockburn gained a new Head – Mr Harmer, serving until 1929. Mr Wallace, the first Head, gave the school a science and Industry emphasis, striving to produce highly skilled artisans for the industries of south Leeds but Mr Harmer sought to balance the school with the build- up of the Arts side and the creation of 6 Arts alongside 6 Science. More students reached Matriculation standard and a very few went on to university. Thirdly – and fortuitously – in 1907 a young Mr Champion joined the staff as a Physics teacher and stayed for the next 43 years, becoming Senior Master and making his mark on the school. He saw character building in all the pupils as his task and worked tirelessly at this, emphasising the school motto ‘Non scholae sed vitae’. However before World War II, in spite of scholarships, only 10% of pupils nationally received a secondary education and 90% had to be content with an elementary one.

Date:
21-May-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Brian Robinson

Comment:
Meanwhile the number of mainly fee-paying pupils at Cockburn increased only slowly over the years to around 800 in 1945 but declined again after that, although the school could cater for over 1000 pupils. Some children passed the scholarship exam but their parents felt they could not afford to provide for their upkeep until the age of 16 when the elementary school leaving age was still 14 or 15. The school was never over-subscribed as happens with schools nowadays. The fee-paying pupils also had to pass an entrance exam to attend. By the 1950s the school reached unprecedented levels of academic success, quite a few students going on to Oxford or Cambridge. This was now clearly a selective grammar school with all its pupils having to first pass the 11 plus exam to get there after fee paying had been abolished by the 1944 Education Act. The Act offered secondary education for all pupils but for the vast majority that meant a secondary modern school. Most pupils in south Leeds still did not manage to get to Cockburn High School. Keith Waterhouse, the famous Leeds journalist and playwright, was one of these and later said he had thought of forming a “Failed Cockburn” society to show what talent had been missed. However in the 1950s and 60s there was increasing discontent with the 11 plus selection examination in several parts of the country, resulting in separate grammar and secondary modern schools in most areas, but more and more local education authorities were opting for comprehensive schools of one kind or another. No one complained about the output of grammar schools but their poor relations, the secondary modern schools, were often found wanting. West Sussex – not known for its poverty – was one of the early authorities to change over. Finally the Labour government elected in 1964 gave the big push towards comprehensive type schools with its Circular 10/65 and many authorities followed its recommendations. Mrs Thatcher offered little opposition to the change-over when she was Education Minister 1970 – 74. Leeds changed to the comprehensive form of secondary schools in the early 1970s and Cockburn was naturally drawn into the new system, some said with dire consequences. Few grammar schools welcomed the move and some staff found the change very difficult indeed. Leeds Grammar School however was unaffected, being an independent school outside the State and LEA system. Cockburn soldiered on then as a comprehensive school to the 1980s when the final blow was felt with the discovery of asbestos in its construction. It was cheaper to demolish the school than to rebuild and renovate it. The construction had been somewhat elaborate from the beginning and now it was found to be fatally flawed.

Date:
21-May-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Brian Robinson

Comment:
That probably should have been the end of Cockburn High School after 80 years of public service to the working people of south Leeds. But the council thought differently and after the school in Burton Road was demolished, its name was transferred to a new school situated further south in Leeds, on Gipsy Lane between Beeston and Middleton. The new Cockburn was a comprehensive school which in recent years has made enormous strides forward. However it has faced tasks and problems which were unknown in the old Cockburn High School, problems of integrating different ethnic groups within the community, establishing good pastoral care and both home/school and community relations, dealing with many forms of learning difficulties and social deprivation. My parents knew where the old school was but never entered its doors. Most parents were the same. Cockburn in those days looked more to its Old Pupils Association rather than to home/school links of its current pupils. Parents then signed the school reports and that officially was their job done. Similarly the old Cockburn was never a community school. Some fee-paying pupils came from as far away as Roundhay, but it was never admitted that perhaps they had failed to get into Roundhay High School. The name Cockburn can have meant little or nothing to most of the children, parents and even teachers in the new Cockburn Comprehensive School. Progress was surely made here in this era by the efforts of the staff, parents and pupils, not by the name of the school. The original Cockburn High School was an oasis of learning and academic achievement in the industrial but stable working class district of south Leeds. It offered social mobility to pupils such as Richard Hoggart in the 1930s, virtually an orphan from a poor home in Hunslet, brought up by aunties and grandmas, ending up as an author, university professor, Warden of Goldsmiths College, University of London, and the representative of the United Nations Educational, Social and Cultural Organisation in Paris. Cockburn High School is thus a cherished memory for so many who passed through its doors but it has gone and times have changed. Its name really belongs to the past twentieth century and not the present. A very different kind of educational initiative is now under way at the new Cockburn School. Let us hope some outstanding leaders and teachers can be attracted to this different but worthy educational cause in south Leeds in the twenty-first century. If the new Cockburn Comprehensive School eventually succeeds in its mission as the Cockburn High School of old did, it too will have a record to be really proud of.

Date:
21-May-2015

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Chadwick

Comment:
Pleasant memories esp of 6th form. Like Christine Hebenton (nee Gatehouse) I attended 1957 to 1964. Often wondered what happened to fellow pupils. I was in 6th form science and did A levels in Maths, Further Maths and Physics. Mr Starbuck was Head. Off to find and old class photo! JC

Date:
10-Jun-2015

Email:
johnchadwick46@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
COCKBURN HIGH SCHOOL, Burton Road - - - 2005519_39999026 - - - I have to concur with Vern's comment. No, it wouldn't have been anything sinister. The attack on Grammar Schools nationally, was just political gross stupidity. Why should anyone in their right mind want to close down Centers of Educational Excellence. Perhaps expressions such as:- Jealousy - Blinkered Vision- Inferiority Complex - - Fear of The Intelligentsia, might go some way to explain it.

Date:
05-Nov-2015

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
donald rhodes

Comment:
John chadwick,are you the same john chadwick who was in my class at rowland. Rd institute of higher learning? If I am correct you may remember me. Please amail

Date:
17-Nov-2015

Email:
donrhodes@pac.com.au

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Jacob Dyson

Comment:
A Photo of Cockburn High School during 1956-1958 turned up in a desk in Bury , Manchester . The Photo contained my Grandfather and found its way to my Grandmother . It contained Trophies , the Coat of arms . Could somebody help me? His name was John Edward Dyson , he passed on in 2010.

Date:
31-Jan-2016

Email:
jacobdyson012@outlook.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Keith Nelson

Comment:
My Dad lived in Middleton and attended Cockburn High School from 1931 after getting an assisted scholarship. His dad died in 1932 so it must have been very hard for him and his mum.

Date:
09-Feb-2016

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Carole McCulloch

Comment:
Today is budget day with news of further messing about with the secondary schools. Again! Thank goodness I was a pupil at Cockburn between 1960 and 1967 when education didn't change every few months. For those seven years I had the finest of teachers, especially Mr Pelham , English and Mr Mason, History, the finest of traditions and the highest standards in everything. Most pupils at Cockburn were from working class backgrounds but were given an education that couldn't be bettered in the most expensive schools. Happy days and happy memories.

Date:
16-Mar-2016

Email:
caroletdf@aol.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
I think that Carole McCulloch has made an excellent point here. The old "3 R's" of education seem to have been cast aside, in the race to achieve so called, 'Targets', - - - to the detriment of the very basics of education. Whatever happened to basic grammar, - - - the apostrophe, - - - apostrophe 'S - - - S' apostrophe - - - how to form a proper sentence - - - the knowledge and understanding of 'the double negative??? Whatever happened to being able to spell correctly, and being able to do mental arithmetic? All those foundations for a sound education, were well anchored in the minds of practically all of my generation before we even took The 11+ Examination. There seem to be many kids leaving school these days with little of, - - - dare I say, "any" of the above. No wonder our educational standards are the lowest, when compared with just about any other European country. When was it that we became not best in the world any more???

Date:
19-Mar-2016

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
shaun spooner

Comment:
went there between 1977 and left in 1908 starbuck retired just before I left great days and a great rugby team of which I was part of miss the lads and the fun days here's to all the original old cockburnians

Date:
10-May-2016

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Stephen Brown-Bolton

Comment:
Well,I discovered this 'well' patronised site about Cockburn High School!So,what?Well I was a pupil there from 1957 t0 1963.Seriously,have you read the whole 'page'?Names ring bells for many peopl:Mr Starbuck the headmaster when I was there I don't remember much of,but I do remember Mr Rawcliffe.He was very firm with us but more friendly to me as I got older {no more six of the best].He moved on to Leeds Central High School as Head,I had lots of chums there.[Crikey chaps].I do remember that we used to 'goon' around.Whose we?You may well ask!Ian Kirk,Martyn Naylor,Alan Larkin,John Winstanley,Chris Ball,Kenny Silvers,think that was it.The girls wouldn't 'play ball',distant but friendly.I blame the seperate playgrounds[and toilets].Dave Wright [of Scotter]was a year ahead of us/me,he has a brick from the original building.There are many others I remember by name.Teachers,yes,girls too Yvonne Stone,Judith Jackson,Valerie Todd,Eileen Teague,Andrea Schofield to name but a few,all married or widowed by now!So Malcolm Lambourne ,a sixth former in my first two years,and his younger brother was in my year along with Philip Whiteley but they moved on after the 3rd year.Mr Rhodes was the best Maths teacher.and Miss Hunt was the best History teach.That's enough don't want to bore y'all.Bye.

Date:
13-Jun-2016

Email:
steve.bbolton@gmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Walker

Comment:
Ah,Mr.Rhodes,Always immaculately turned out!-I remember him turning up in his new Morgan sports car,in deep red,with a black soft-top.-Mr.Green slid into the passenger seat,and the whole mass shot off down Burton Road,at a rate of knots!-Akin to a Saturn rocket taking off!-Great Days!

Date:
16-Jun-2016

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to Stephen Brown-Bolton's comment. Are you sure that you are correct with the name, Mr. Rawcliffe, Stephen? As far as I am aware, it was the teacher who taught german, Mr. Rockcliffe (Rocky), who left, to become Headmaster at Leeds Central High School. Have a look at Keith Butterfield's comment. If my 'counting while scanning skills' are up to scratch, it is 78th from the top.

Date:
17-Jun-2016

Email:
GrahamSchp@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Carole McCulloch (Atkinson)

Comment:
I'm almost certain the Deputy Head was Mr Rockcliffe who went on to be Head at Central. Rawcliffes was the uniform shop where our expensive uniforms were bought in central Leeds.

Date:
21-Jun-2016

Email:
caroletdf@aol.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Derek Ruddock (Spud)

Comment:
Ah the good old days. I was there, like Garry Freeman from 1966-1973. Some memories stick like poo to a blanket. Sue Hirst, my delightful form teacher, straight out of Uni: I remember her tears when she left. Fanny Pickles, arriving with academic gown like a bat out of hell pointing at objects and uttering gibberish (La fenetre, le torchon…), only to have half the class respond in kind: I later learnt that the kids from Cross Flats School had done French there. Mr Bowman, the music teacher tring to teach 30 kids the rudiments of rhythm (‘ tar tay tar, tar tay tar, taffay teffy taffay teffy, tar tay tar’), Mr Smith in RE (‘Empty vessels make most noise’) and Mr Rhodes in maths (‘You weren’t listening were you?’) T.E.N. Starbuck was an imposing figure as headmaster, but overshadowed literally by ‘Twanky’ Lucas, who towered well over 6 feet. I remember Mr Hutchinson persuading me to preserver with my history ‘O’ level (I passed ? ) despite having just advising me that Mickey Mouse was not prime minister in 1866. Another teacher was Terry Hawkin, a man of small stature who liked to draw suitcases on the board, and, in the event of one forgetting ones book, would require the miscreant to stand on his/her desk and apologise ‘Herr Hawkin, ich habe mein buch vergessen’. That’s the only bit of German I remember. Thanks. I cannot for the life of me remember the biology teacher’s name, nor that of the younger one with the blond curls. I do remember the formidable Mr Thompson in physics, who had a surprisingly dry wit if you got to know him better, and Mr Creighton (‘Hofton, Hooton, Hoeton, Howton’) in Chemistry. Anyone else remember the mushroom cloud of fumes in the Girl’s stairwell as the result of a thermite demonstration? Mrs Saunders in Geography would be pleased to know that I can still remember obscure capitals for obscurer countries when completing the crossword. The early 70’s were a big change for the school: the gym was converted into the woodworking room: no more ‘Captain Clutterbuck’s War’ and the woodworking room into a second biology classroom. At the same time the old science labs were ripped out and replaced with new ones. Mr Caton from woodwork was pleased to get a supply of aged teak. Less happy were the schoolkids who could no longer poison themselves by digging small globules of mercury from the cracks with a compass point. A larger change was, for the science stream, to have old textbooks in Imperial measures while we were swapping in the syllabus to MKS. The confusion was further compounded in the upper sixth by the change to SI units, after we had just got our new MKS books. The major change at this time was, of course, the change of the school from being selective to becoming a comprehensive. I currently live in Sydney(2016). Anyone who knows me is welcome to drop me a line pp2076@gmail.com

Date:
13-Oct-2016

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Billy Britvic

Comment:
To all you Cockburnians? take a look at the following link - picture of teachers c1968ish https://www.flickr.com/photos/61182351@N04/8273332872/in/photolist-dB5ZCd-rdnquY-pUTaZT-rzgKkj-pAWt7p-rdTtBJ-rMMaDb-taSon1-owA3zt-xeczJm-nDgmmb-qVK28g-cDBSh9-cEaVZy-cEaW4q-8XqWxh-8u7Sp3-pSopnY-gfT8EP-qwXQXV-cEaVSG-od9iAK-oeREv3-aCzqgh-aezEvS-odcRUM-8Pgqbo-pze5ft-8jUCqF-qexkBx-nthLef-4h9Xta-qvVnoG-qeqqAJ-qexjCD-pze2M2-qvVo7f-c2uaDh-aeFDXm-pze2UX-qez66T-pze5o4-qexnHB-c2utAG-qvZ44R-qerdTA-pze17Z-qexnPZ-5qGQtw-gGd3t

Date:
20-Oct-2016

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Billy Britvic

Comment:
Not too sure if that link works. Try searching flickr for Cockburn High School https://www.flickr.com/photos/61182351@N04/8273332872/in/dateposted-public/

Date:
20-Oct-2016

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Myra Rowlands

Comment:
I never went to Cockburn High School but I had a cousin who won a scholarship and attended and then in later years my sister passed her 11 plus and attended. I was in awe of anyone who went there. They were all so smart in their uniforms and obviously very clever. I did however attend Burton House as it used a room there as an extra classroom from Hunslet Moor Primary School. I have the most happiest of memories. The boys from Cockburn could be seen in their cricket whites on the back stairs of Burton House as it was shared with Cockburn High School and Hunslet Moor. The rules were we had to keep well away from the back staircase and would be in trouble if caught out of bounds. Lovely to see the photograph and I would go back to those days any time. I was at Hunslet Moor from 1954.

Date:
28-Nov-2016

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Paul Crompton

Comment:
I was at the school approx. between 1947 - 1953. The headmaster was Mr. Sutcliffe. Mr. Rockliffe taught German, but I was in Miss Milner's class doing Latin. Mr. Newton took Art, Miss Malins Biology(?), Mr. Williams PE, Mr. Welbourne Maths, Miss Pickles(?), 'Herbie' was our class teacher for a time. He never laid a finger on me. There are so many memories aren't there? I was in Cross Flatts County Primary School first and my poems and essays were regularly in the school magazine But at Cockburn there was a different 'tone' and I had only one essay accepted there. email: paulhcrompton@gmail.com

Date:
15-Jan-2017

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Roy Walker

Comment:
In response to Dennis Brook's question,in a much earlier comment listing,I would suggest that the female maths teacher was Miss Cass.

Date:
18-Jan-2017

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Ben Butterfield

Comment:
I went to Cockburn circa 1947 to 1952. Ours was the first examination for GCE as opposed to previously being School Certificate. Needless to say that I must have been one of the first to leave without any. In those days , if you did not do well in the "Mocks", you did not take the exam. I too remember the Head, Mr. Sutcliffe. The deputy head was Mr. Champion. I also remember Miss Pickles , she was on and still is on my school photograph. Needless to say,Les Williams was my favourite teacher as I was mad keen on Rugby. Mr. Moss always frightened the life out of me, as he glided along the corridors with his gown flowing. He taught French, something else that was all foreign to me.

Date:
22-Jan-2017

Email:
ben122@btinternet.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
David Wright

Comment:
I attended CHS from 1956 to 1961,starting in 1D and promoted into 2B the following year. My primary school was Bewerley Street - a great school for rugby league players and actors, but not very successful in the 11+ stakes! 5 boys passed in my year which I believe was an outstanding year. 3 ended up in 2B with me. My favourite teachers were Bob Newton (Art) and Nova Williamson (English). I was rubbish at art- this was before rubbish art was fashionable- and stopped doing it after year 2. However,I went to Bob's after school weight training sessions held in the upper hall when I got to know him well. After leaving school I met up with him again at St. Edwards Church Weight Lifting Club in Holbeck.We trained Monday, Wednesday,Friday - I didn't make it to every session, but never missed Fridays when we went to the pub afterwards. Nova Williamson was a great English teacher. form mistress, and a lovely person. She was also very beautiful and we all had a crush on her. Lots of other memories which I would be glad to share with anyone who would like to get in touch via email.

Date:
15-Feb-2017

Email:
dvw1945@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Buy a copy of this photograph 2005519_39999026

Select the size, finish and quantity of the photograph you require.  If you require sepia toning please tick the appropriate box. Please note the size of the photographs will be as near as possible to that requested, however to avoid distorting the image sizes may not be exact. VAT will be added to the order at checkout.

Quantity: Sepia Toning (+50%)
Size Matt Gloss
10 x 8 inches £6.67 £6.67
12 x 9 inches £9.17 £9.17
16 x 12 inches £10.84 £10.84
Add to basket