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Description:
Undated. A formal group photograph showing staff and officials of a hospital, on a lawned area outside the building. The uniforms of the nurses, and the attire of the two ladies on the front row, are consistent with a date of the 1920s. (Update: 22/5/2012, we are no nearer to finding the location of this one but very much appreciate all the suggestions and comments added below. On the back of the photograph is written in pencil, "Cookridge Hospital, Leeds 1920s/30s?" We are now sure, having looked at other images, that this isn't Cookridge, and there is a possibility that it's not Leeds at all! (Another possible clue is that the photograph was taken by Beryl of York).

User Comments:

Name:
FRANCES WICKS/KIRLEW

Comment:
GOING BY THE CLOTHES I WOULD THINK THIS WAS TAKEN DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR, AND I WONDER IF IT COULD BE THE SANATORIUM NEAR KILLINGBECK ?

Email:
fwicks@btinternet.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to the comment by Frances Wicks/Kirlew regarding the date. If you look closely, you can see that the cut of some of the men's suits puts this picture well past the First World War. The clincher, is what one of the ladies in the front row is wearing around her neck.If you look closely you can see that she is wearing a fox-fur stole with head. She is also wearing what appears to be a cloche shaped hat, with plume. Both these items were the at the height of fashion in the late 1930's. It is also worth noting that none of the men are sporting the heavy luxuriant moustaches that were prevalent in the early part of the 20th century. I would even venture to say that this picture could even have been taken after the Second World War. Again, if you look at the suits worn by the younger men, and the light coloured one worn by the chap in the front line, you get the feel that they are post 2nd World War. It must be said also, that the fox fur was still worn for quite some time after the war. Who knows. Some of these guys may still be around. Having perused all the pictures of Killingbeck Hospital, that are available on Leodis at the moment ( 12-2-2007 ) , I was unable to find any resemblance of the distinctive plinth and "A" shaped decoration that appears over the door and each window frame. I can only deduce that this photograph, is not of Killingbeck Hospital. I have studied photographs of other hospitals on the site, to no avail. Surely, someone must remember seeing that geometric shape somewhere.

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
frances wicks / kirlew

Comment:
I`m sure now this is seacroft hospital. There is a definate likeness to the building in picture 200294-61664981 - don`t you think....? go and take a look.

Email:
fwicks@btinternet.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to the second comment by Frances Wicks/Kirlew. I am at a loss to understand the reasoning here, as the two buildings are totally and irrefragably different. The one above is brick built and shows three lines of horizontal decoration made up of one or three courses of white glazed bricks. Over each of the windows and doors there is a plinth, supporting a decorated and recessed "A-Frame". On the other hand,the building shown in 200294_61664981 is stone built. The only decoration shown is a small stone ledge that is set between the ground-floor windows and those immediately above them. This will no doubt carry on right around the building. The only other decoration in the tooth-like design running up the side, as it turns at ninety degrees. This will probably appear at all the major corners.

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Hazel Ramejkis/ nee Woodcock

Comment:
My first thought on seeing this photgraph was the same as Frances Wicks. It looks very familiar. I used to go with my father to deliver milk there from Home Farm Templenewsam.

Email:
mattsgirlkirkby@yahoo.com

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Name:
Graham Daniels

Comment:
Could this be Cookridge Hospital? Unfortunately the only photo on Leodis is an aerial shot of the entire complex so it is difficult to be sure.

Email:
penydarren@hotmail.co.uk

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Name:
Graham Daniels

Comment:
An addition to my comments above one alternative could well be the original Chapel Allerton Hospital, situated in its own grounds at the end of Harehills Lane. I shal ask my colleagues at CAH if any old photos exist to see if I am correct.

Email:
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Name:
KEYHOLEKATE

Comment:
This is almost certainly Beckett Park?The teacher training college at Beckett's Park was built in 1913. During the First World War it was converted to a military hospital. It was officially called the 2nd Northern General Hospital but was more commonly referred to as Beckett's Park Hospital. There were 3200 beds and the hospital treated 57,200 soldiers between 1914 to 1918. The hospital was gradually returned to educational uses until the outbreak of the Second World War when it was used to treat the Dunkirk wounded. The college is now part of Leeds Metropolitan University.

Email:
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Name:
irene

Comment:
I'm not sure but I think I've just recently seen this very picture in a book titled " Workhouses of The North " by the author; Peter Higginbothom which is ONLY available from England thru AmazonUK.com( I think that is the web site for the purchase of the book. Hope this info is a help.

Email:
nwakaft21@yahoo.com

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Name:
steve wilde

Comment:
this looks more like st marys hospital armley it is not old chapelallerton i work there and do have old pictures of chapel allerton

Date:
27-Oct-2008

Email:
swilde66@yahoo.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Steve Wilde's comment prompted me to have a look around St. Mary's Hospital on Green Hill Road (Oct. 2008). As a result, I can safely say that none of its red brick buildings bears any resemblance to the above picture.

Date:
26-Nov-2008

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Chippy

Comment:
For anyone interested in the Workhouses of the North book,it is available from Leeds City libraries

Date:
03-Jun-2009

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to Irene's comment. The book, WORKHOUSES OF THE NORTH by Peter Higginbotham, available from Leeds Libraries, as 'Chippy' quite rightly says, does have one picture of a building showing a triangular decoration over several windows. However, it is in the Newcastle area, and is built of stone, not brick. The windows are straight-topped, not arched, and none of the triangles sit on a plinth. So it's "back to square one".

Date:
10-Sep-2009

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Chippy

Comment:
Is there any concrete evidence that this is in fact a Leeds photo ? Things must creep in from personal collections,the owner may be Leeds based but could well hve been educated elsewhere,or moved home.

Date:
17-Aug-2010

Email:
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Name:
Graham A. Schofield.

Comment:
There are forty-one people in this picture. No doubt each one would have been given, or purchased a copy. So it is more than likely that several copies still exist. As ever more and more people discover Leodis, surely at least one picture, along with the relevant information will surface eventually.

Date:
19-Aug-2010

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Terry Watson.

Comment:
Looking at the picture I get the feeling it may be Rothwell that was adjacent to the jaw bones. Just maybe.

Date:
22-Sep-2010

Email:
TellWatson@talktalk.net

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Name:
d byrne

Comment:
I have a photograph dated 1923, of some of the staff at Cookridge Convalescent home, featuring my Great Grandfather who worked there. I can positively identify the chap at the far right of the back row as being in my photo.

Date:
29-Jan-2011

Email:
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Name:
D Byrne

Comment:
Thought I'd better clarify that my photograph has the group posed in front of some bushes so is no help in identifying the building.

Date:
09-Feb-2011

Email:
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Name:
Lynne

Comment:
I used to care for a lady who was a nurse for many, many years at St Georges Hospital on Wood Lane, Rothwell. She had a photograph very similar on her sideboard??

Date:
14-May-2011

Email:
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Name:
Shirley Holton

Comment:
Frankly, this looks like Middlewood (Psychiatric) Hospital, Sheffield. In which case, as most mental hospitals were built to the same pattern, could this be Menston Psychatric Hospital which served the residents of Leeds for many years?

Date:
09-Jun-2011

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With regard to the possibility that this building might be a psychiatric hospital, I have only just recently learnt something which might rule this out. I have shown this picture to a friend of ours who used to be a nurse/manager at Menston Psychiatric Hospital. He tells me that normally most Mental Institutions built in the Victorian and Edwardian Periods would have had narrower, or smaller windows. In his opinion this building would not have been built as a Mental Hospital. Of course, that doesn't rule out the possibility that it could have been used as such in later times. In response to Shirley Holton's comment:- I have just been looking at several photographs of Middlewood Psychiatric Hospital (Sheffield), and none of them show any of its buildings having frontages like the one shown here.

Date:
27-Dec-2011

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Jo

Comment:
anyone think this maybe the old dispensary that was on North Street

Date:
07-Feb-2012

Email:
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Name:
annette

Comment:
I thought it could have been a photograph of the dispensary on North Street, which was demolished in the 1960? i have tried to find a photo but haven't had any luck..

Date:
02-Apr-2012

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
John

Comment:
There is a good photo of the old dispensary here on Leodis. It bears no resemblance to this building i'm sorry to say.

Date:
12-Jun-2012

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
jonathan brown

Comment:
I have old photo of the military hospital at Becket Park. Windows are NOT the same.

Date:
25-Jan-2013

Email:
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Name:
Denise Foster

Comment:
St George's, Rothwell?

Date:
18-Aug-2013

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
JD

Comment:
It's definitely not St George's Rothwell, the architecture and configuration of multi coloured bricks is totally different if you look for St Georges on FlickR you can see the difference

Date:
25-Aug-2013

Email:
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Name:
pat fisher

Comment:
Just a thought ,could this be the old Leeds maternity hospital,known as Hyde Terrace?,it was nr the Leeds Grammar school on Clarendon Rd.

Date:
26-Oct-2013

Email:
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Name:
Melanie (Wortley)

Comment:
This is definitely Beckett Park Hospital (now Carnegie uni) my husbands work printed a book called stories from a war hospital all about Beckett Park, the book contains true stories about the wounded servicemen and nurses that were there during the First World War. It was a teacher training college and was then used as a military hospital.

Date:
11-Sep-2014

Email:
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Name:
Richard

Comment:
Beckett's Park doesnt have the pointy bits over the windows.

Date:
12-Sep-2014

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
seff

Comment:
Leodis states that this photo was taken by 'Beryl' of York. This was my grandmother Annie Elizabeth Hunter Hill (née Humphrey). Her photography studio in York is listed in the York Trade Directory under the name 'Beryl' from 1927 to 1931. From 1932 the name was changed to 'Madame Beryl'. Hence most likely this 'Beryl' photo was taken between 1927 and 1931. Most portrait photography was undertaken in the studio setting but sometimes off-site. Other photography (such as the featured photo) was taken on location. Additionally, for several years there were "branches" in other towns where photos were taken but then the plates were sent to the main studio in York for processing. Most photography took place in Yorkshire, though occasionally beyond.

Date:
31-Oct-2015

Email:
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Name:
Pamela

Comment:
Though I never saw it, there was a hospital in Thorpe-Arch at one time named Marguerite something.Perhaps someone has a memory of actually seeing it?

Date:
21-Dec-2015

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
john

Comment:
Check out an interesting blog about the Margurite Hepton Orthopaedic Hospital which includes photos. http://margueriteheptonhospital.blogspot.co.uk/ A mix of buildings are shown but none of them are redbrick.

Date:
24-Dec-2015

Email:
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Name:
Pamela

Comment:
Thank-you John, for pointing the way to that really very interesting site. Did that hospital become a boys school at a later date?

Date:
09-Jan-2016

Email:
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Name:
Graham Daniels

Comment:
On the back of the numerous hours I spend out and about with a camera, taking shots of such places, Nostell Priory is the only building I have found with the triangular window surrounds?

Date:
27-May-2016

Email:
grahamd2010@live.co.uk

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Name:
John

Comment:
Pam - sorry I don't know whether the hospital later became a boy's school. Graham - From photos, Nostell Priory has alternating triangular and circular pediments over the windows. This alternating pattern is quite a common feature on Victorian classical revival buildings. Nostell Priory is stone -built so bears no resemblance to the brickwork in the hospital photo.

Date:
07-Jun-2016

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
John

Comment:
A Secret Leeds contributor thought he had nailed this when he identified it as the Central London Sick Asylum District , Middlesex , later renamed Colindale Hospital , near Hendon. There are more photos here http://www.workhouses.org.uk/CentralLondonSAD/. Some in colour which show that the architect used some very similar decorative features to the unknown hospital. The architects were a firm called "Giles , Gough and Trollope " with offices in Charing Cross London. In the late Victorian early Edwardian period 1880- 1910, these architects designed a number of large Workhouses and Asylums across the country. Many of these workhouses later became hospitals: military hospitals during WW1 , or in the 1920's, when workhouses were abolished, some became mental hospitals. Looking at photos of hospitals designed by Giles, Gough, Trollope, a number of their buildings built around 1900 use very similar architectural features (namely distinctive pointed/ triangular pediments above windows and horizontal bands of paler brickwork found in the Leodis photo and the Colindale Hospital). A few examples are Hammersmith Workhouse 1903 http://www.workhouses.org.uk/Hammersmith/ Bethnal Green Military Hospital 1900 http://tinyurl.com/hf99rfr St Mary's Hospital I am not suggesting any of these are an exact match for the Leodis hospital photo but it would be very interesting to know whether there are any workhouses, asylums or hospitals in Yorkshire designed by Messrs Giles, Gough and Trollope.

Date:
19-Jan-2017

Email:
Not displayed

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