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Broad Lane, Yates' Mill


Broad Lane, Yates
Description:
Undated. View of Yates' Mill seen on a stormy night, with rainbows visible in the sky. Also known as Wellington Mill, it has been the site of a mill since at least 1830. William Edward Yates purchased the mill in 1882, having started his woollen manufacturers business in 1871 in Loisterdyke. After his death in 1896, he was succeded by his sons, firstly James Yates and then Charles Yates, and later by his grandsons W.E. Yates and A.Yates.

User Comments:

Name:
Pam Holmes nee Lonsdale

Comment:
I worked at Yates's for a couple of years from 1964 to 1966 when I left to get married. I was a twister. I moved to east Leeds.

Email:
pamnez@ntlworld.com

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Name:
alfazmarauder@hotmail.com

Comment:
I worked at Yates as an apprentice overlooker from 1959 to 1963. My two Grandmothers, my Grandfather, my Mother and my Wife also worked there. Now the building no longer exists,its very sad. Tony Maskill

Email:
alfazmarauder@hotmail.com

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Name:
George Wigglesworth

Comment:
My father Fred R Wigglesworth started work as a warehouse lad in 1906 at Aire Street. War service in the West Yorks intervened and he returned to work until retirement in 1957 having represented the firm and Bower Roebucks in Ireland, Scotland and the West Riding.

Email:
g.m.wigg@googlemail.com

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Name:
Mick Agar

Comment:
My late father, Francis William "Frank" Agar worked for WE Yates for about 25 years between 1950(or just before) and 1975 when he was made redundant. Over the years he had various office jobs there. Those were the days when the West Riding went from being an important centre of both the woolen worsted industry and tailoring to an importer. Sometimes, he had to work on a Saturday for stocktaking or something like that and he took me with him when I was small in the 1950's. (My mother used to work in a shop on Saturdays.) Looking back now, it's obvious how little modernisation there had been over the years. Those were the days of suit lengths to have made up into a suit at one of the many leeds tailors. When the cloth had been woven, the pieces were checked for faults which were marked in the selvedge with a small knot of thread. A length of cloth with a fault was called a fent. A decent tailor could cut a suit avoiding the fault. (This is what I remember from what my dad told me. Somebody who worked on the actual weaving will know a lot more about what the work inviolved. The firm used to have all sorts of what might now be called freebies - small gifts to customers with the firm's trademark. We still have a WE Yates room thermometer and a folding coathanger with a built-in clothes brush from those days.

Date:
14-Mar-2012

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Ian Smith

Comment:
Hi everyone - This topic is of interest to me partly due to the previous posters, besides the photograph of Yates's Mill. I used to play rugby at Bramley Old Boys with Tony Maskill, who I believe now lives in Spain, and I worked in the Leeds City Police (later West Yorkshire Police) at the same time as Mick Agar and also his brother, Richard, who was a former colleague in the C.I.D. at Dewsbury Road Police Station and later at Weetwood Police Station, who sadly died in 1995. My wife Elizabeth (Betty) Smith (nee Wilkins) worked at Yates's Mill from 1958 until 1970. She was a burler and mender, which I understand consisted of finding minor faults and knots in worsted cloths and repairing them and also sewing missing threads along the full length of the cloth. - Ian

Date:
15-Jul-2012

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Carol Shaw

Comment:
I remember Mr Agar very well, I worked in the office with him for about 10 years. My name then was Carol Pywell, I was an invoice typist. It is thanks to Yates' I met my second husband who worked for the finishers Herbert Roberts in Keighley. I actually used to look forward to going to work!

Date:
20-Jul-2013

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Belinda Palfrey (maiden name Yates)

Comment:
Lovely to read all about the people who worked at the Mill. My Great Great Grandfather was W E Yates and I love all the history! I am trying to find out where the family buriel site is - anyone know??

Date:
27-Aug-2014

Email:
belinda@myphotogenie.co.uk

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Name:
Peter Dickinson

Comment:
My father, George Dickinson worked at the mill from 1927 - when he would be 14 yrs old, until redundancy in 1975, as an overlooker. As a boy he lived in Wellington Terrace until his father's death in 1936 when the family moved to Kirkstall. After his marriage to Louie they moved to the Hillcourts. His friends at work included Freddie Mann, Barrie Seed, Geoff Birks and Reg Middleton. He was captain of the football team, the cricket team and a member of the Sports club for many years before the war. He was Treasurer of the Leeds Textile Workers Union for 40 years until the Union closed. He took me there once - for the Coronation celebrations in 1952 when there was an Open Day. I was so frightened of the noise, the dirt and the atmosphere in the mill that I never went back. I think dad knew what he was doing!

Date:
02-Jan-2015

Email:
peterdickinson90@yahoo.com

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Name:
Helen abbott

Comment:
My mum worked at yates in the sixties her name was Mary rae she met my dad there Paul abbott

Date:
19-May-2017

Email:
trixiebelle1@outlook.com

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