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Cottingley, prefab

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Cottingley, prefab
Description:
1970s. View of a prefabricated house with garden in an unidentified area of Cottingley. Taken between 1971 and 1973.

User Comments:

Name:
Brian Horsley

Comment:
This is 9 Cottingley Walk home of the Davies family looking farther down the Walk past the field with 3 large trees , which were evidently in the garden of the original Cottingley Hall

Email:
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Name:
Chris Went (nee Rhodes)

Comment:
I remember the three trees. When we lived at Cottlingley in the 1950s my friends and I called this - rather grandly - sycamore copse.

Email:
christine.went@ntlworld.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
I can remember this estate being built in the early Post-War years. The houses would arrive on the back of flat-bed lorries. As I recall, these houses were a cheap, temporary measure, in order to alleviate the housing shortage at that time, and that they were only expected to be up for about ten or so years. When people first moved in, there were many complaints of damp, and in some cases, water running down the walls. However things improved greatly in subsequent years, and when the threat of demolition finally loomed, long after the original expected life-span, a very many residents did not want to leave.

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Andrea Postle

Comment:
Cottingley Walk, does anyone remember the footsteps that were imprinted at the beginning of the walk, obviously someone had walked on the floor when it was still wet!! Also sledging down from the three trees and ending up on Cottingley Crescent! - no cars in those days. Happy days.

Email:
jackandy@talktalk.net

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Name:
brian thomas

Comment:
I remember the imprinted footsteps and the Davies family. I used to deliver evening papers for Jack Parkers Newsagents 10 bob a week. There were Evening papers in those days 1953/4 Post and News. Irate phone calls if we slipped in the wrong one. Had to walk up and down every path, each house being detached, making for a long round. We also had to deliver Comics, Magazines and Periodicals,some of which were very revealing to a 14 year old!.

Date:
05-Jan-2009

Email:
helensdad@mac.com

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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
Brian Thomas... sir, I mean you no disrespect whatsoever, but you must have lived in a more upmarket area of Leeds than I in 1954. Ten-bob a week for your paper-round? I had an extended paper-round in 1956/57 - also with comics and magazines, and I was the only boy trusted to collect money on Friday-evenings. For this I was paid 7/6. And as for 'irate phone-calls'... really? Ordinary folk did not have telephones. There was only one house in my Burmantofts street with a telephone, and that was my Father's previous employer who also owned our house. It was still that way when the area was demolished in 1965 and we were rehoused. It wasn't only that telephones were extremely expensive either, but that one also had to show the need... and even then, it would likely be a shared line, known as a party-line. As a second-thought regarding my paper-round remuneration, at 'seven-shillings and six-pence' it was much better than I probably realised at the time. Later in 1957, when I started work, I only earned £3.00 per week (£2/14/9d after NI) for a 'forty-four and a half hour week and compulsory night-school on three nights. I still don't know where they got that odd half-hour from..??

Date:
28-Nov-2009

Email:
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Name:
Sheila Jubb

Comment:
Re the pre-fab, there is one erected at the museum called Eden Camp which is near Malton in North Yorkshire. This museum was developed from what was a prisoner of war camp (WW2) and it has, over the years, gathered an interesting collection of items, the pre-fab being just one of them.

Date:
07-Feb-2010

Email:
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Name:
Brian thomas

Comment:
Yep, 10 Bob a week from Jack Parkers' Cottingley Estate Newsagents. Upmarket? I don't think so but the people were great and all phone boxes un-vandalised at that time. You could even get lucky with 'Button B' now and then.

Date:
07-Feb-2010

Email:
helensdad@mac.com

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Name:
Ron Davies

Comment:
I moved into one of these pre-fabs of this design with my mother and father in 1947, No 23 Woodbridge Road on the Becketts Park Estate.

Date:
16-Feb-2010

Email:
rondavies66@googlemail.com

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Name:
Brian Foster

Comment:
In those days Cottingley was famous for the Crematorium and the estate of Prefabs. Having been brought up in Hunslet I used to d-r-e-a-m of living in a prefab with a garden. We used to have to walk a mile to see a tree!!!

Date:
07-Apr-2010

Email:
bjf225@yahoo.com

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Name:
Rick Barker

Comment:
Inflation must have been pretty static back then. I was delivering papers for Jack Parker around 1963 and still getting paid 10 shillings a week. used to get 2/6 for the green sports final on Saturday as I recall which allowed for the illegal purchase of a few bottles of cider at Bill's off licence on Elland Road before proceeding to Morley Town Hall dance. Not a long career though as I got sacked when I didn't turn up the first time it rained .

Date:
15-Apr-2010

Email:
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Name:
brian laycock

Comment:
Rick Barker, in Bill Leafs off licence you could also buy a single Woodbine or a single Durex, great days.

Date:
01-May-2010

Email:
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Name:
Rick Barker 52 Dulverton Drive

Comment:
Brian Laycock. I had forgotten Bill’s surname. He must have been the only adult on the estate who we could call by his first name. But Bill was not just a purveyor of fine ales as you rightly point out Brian. In fact I think Bill, with his fags, booze and condoms, did much to undermine the youth of Cottingley. Particularly the good work Mr Coombes was trying to achieve with his boiled sweets, Sunshine Corner and all things bright and beautiful at the other end of Dulverton Drive. I must admit I sampled both services and still can’t decide which had the greater influence. Looking back on those days I seem to recall there was quite a thriving trade in home deliveries, more than you get today that’s for sure. In addition to the horse drawn milk cart already mentioned by a few ex prefab dwellers, there was a horse drawn coal cart, a mobile (Co-op) green grocers, Pop wagon, bread truck and various insurance agents calling round at odd times of the day, and Jack Parker’s papers of course, express delivery courtesy of yours truly. I once parked my tricycle behind the bread van which promptly backed over it and flattened it. Unfortunately the man from the Prudential said I wasn’t covered. I think my Mum managed to con a large sliced loaf and half a dozen bread buns from the apologetic driver but hardly compensation for losing the fastest thing on three wheels this side of the iron bridge. Lucky I wasn’t sat on it at the time I suppose. Surprising how much you start to remember after browsing this website!

Date:
26-Jul-2010

Email:
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Name:
Peter Heeley

Comment:
I lived at 29 Dulverton Road and they were some of the best times in my life . There was a small green across from our house and next to where Les and Irene Thomas lived (sons Brian and Howard)We always held our bonfire nights on this plot of land , with parents supplying goodies, my mother made the worst toffee ever but sha always made the effort. I seem to recall that the Hall family lived at 25 , Brenda and Joyce were the two girls.Sam and Vi Juice lived opposite us and Harold and Madge Jackson lived to their right , along with son Steve. Sandra and her brother Ernest Donahuelived a few doors from them .Barry Tegerdine and his sister Shirley lived further up the street , a couple of doors away from the rail track . Many of the street names evade me now . Close to our house was a phone box and if you turned left,off Dulverton Road , there was a family called the Chesters, on the right there was the Totties , the Williamsons (Tommy was the son)and the Cousens . William Cousens and myself joined the RAF in May 1962 and I served for 15 years spending many years overseas . I guess that if I were to compare communities , the service was much like my life at Cottingley where everyone was friendly and sociable . I miss those days ,perhaps other people from other parts of the country also lived in similar communities

Date:
23-Sep-2012

Email:
rupertheeley@hotmail.com

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