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Description:
1900s. In this view two women and a child stand in front of the entrance of a house, there is a number 79 next to the door of the stone-built house and curtains and blinds at the multi-paned windows. Image used courtesy of Peter Aldred. Photograph from the David Atkinson Archive.

User Comments:

Name:
Bert

Comment:
A woman who has been handsome holding the hand of her well-dressed son -she dressed in the 1880s/1890s style with no wedding ring but something on her little finger - in front of a substantial stone=built (see the doorway strapping) 18th/early 19th century cottage or court dwelling. Behind her, a very handsome, well-featured girl (daughter perhaps?) who seems to be holding a babe in arms. The thought just appears: Could she be a soldiers wife or widow?

Date:
04-Dec-2010

Email:
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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
It is a shame that this photo was taken when our world seemed to be black and white, although in my 1940's case, it was more like dark brown and dark green. Ironically, the lack of colour in the picture, actually tends to colour one's impression of the situation. It could be easily be anywhere from 1900 to the 1920's, the dress is not particularly indicative of it being earlier. The cottage is certainly 1700's, and I would suggest a southwest of Leeds location. I have been in courtyard cottages just like it ... the step-down into it means that it had a stone floor. The newly-painted number 79, also suggests that it had recently become part of a metropolitan administration and given a postal address. I see no sign that this was a household of the poor, rather the house-proud opposite. I reckon that the photo is meant to be of the child, who is actually a girl ... note the right-over-left fastening of the coat, and its fashionable buttons. This could possibly be a Whitsuntide photo taken at Grandma's.

Date:
17-Dec-2010

Email:
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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
In response to B. Hallam:- Well into the early 20th century, it was common practice to dress very young boys in female clothes. I know it seems strange, but that was the custom. In some levels of society, the practice prevailed well into the 1920's. So it's odds on that this child is a boy. Whatever, they seem to have been a 'well appointed' family. Old Victorian, and early Edwardian properties can still be found in the Ardsley area. Could there be the slimmest of all chances that this might be one of them? Mr. Hallam makes an excellent observation with regard to the house number. There will be archival records of house numbering, and there won't have been many 79's in Ardsley back in the late Victorian and early Edwardian periods. So, it shouldn't be such a difficult task determine the likely location of this particular cottage.

Date:
28-Dec-2010

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
B Walshaw

Comment:
This lookls like the row of houses opposite and between Binks's Butchers and the esso Garrage on bradfor road, i think it used to be a florist at one time

Date:
15-Aug-2012

Email:
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Name:
Brenda Scott nee Johnson

Comment:
Definitely a house-proud family, with their lovely crochet edged blinds at both windows, behind which are the net curtains, and their newly painted house number by the door. I reckon this is Granny holding the hand of her grandchild whilst Mum and babe in arms keep warm inside the house. I don't think this is a Whitsuntide shot - note the rose or honeysuckle trained up the wall and round the window to the left - devoid of foliage. The plants in the wooden trough are inside the house - most likely geraniums ( pelargoniums ) - which could be kept alive indoors in the colder months. I can imagine Granny saying 'Isn't it cold?' and the child clutching a toy rabbit or something of the kind, responding by hunching it's shoulders and replying 'Brrrr!' just as the photographer took the picture! As to the location? I haven't a clue! But what a lovely image it is, and how many stories it could tell.

Date:
07-Dec-2014

Email:
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Name:
John Bean

Comment:
B Walshaw's comment was close, but not quite correct. The image is not the Bradford Road home he/she imagined, as that would be in East Ardsley. The lower part of the property is very similar and it certainly steps down into the property, but the upper level is too low. Unless major alterations have been made over the years. I've not seen any carried out, as I live in East Ardsley. To-day No 79 on that road is the carpet mill formerly the chapel. I would re-numbering has taken place over the years as the Bradford road in east Ardsley has changed considerably since the 1900's.

Date:
09-Jan-2015

Email:
beanj@btinternet.com

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Name:
Derek Wade

Comment:
I may be way out but the interior of the downstairs looks a good deal lower that the outside. This, plus the high step, the wind worn stone, the obvious slope on the road and the narrow pavement (hence narrow road) all point to the old (south) side of Whitby.

Date:
24-Nov-2016

Email:
derek@wade13.plus.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Surely not Whitby, Derek. The soot-blackened stones alone, tell us that this is in an area where the smoke from many mill chimneys was polluting the air. Whitby never had to experience that kind of pollution. Another point to consider in that this picture is from the 'David Atkinson Archive', which is a concentration of images of Morley, not Whitby; - - - Francis Meadow Sutcliffe was the gentleman responsible for images of that particular East Coast Fishing Town.

Date:
10-Oct-2017

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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