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Harry Farnell, Greengrocer, horse and cart


Harry Farnell, Greengrocer, horse and cart
Description:
Undated View of the horse and cart belonging to greengrocer Harry Farnell, who had a fruit and vegetable delivery round in the Cross Green/Richmond Hill area of East Leeds around the time of the Second World War. During the war much produce was in short supply but here the cart seems well stocked.

User Comments:

Name:
Anne (Tate)

Comment:
harry farnell used to come to Cross Green Crescent every Tuesday and Friday, his horse was called Flash, I remember it well, if the horse disgraced itself, the manure used to go on mums roses...

Date:
23-Jul-2009

Email:
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Name:
Lyn Facey

Comment:
The street looks like Fewston Street, my grandparents lived in that street during the 50's till the 70's those houses had an outside loo. my grandparents toilet had a long wooden bench with a hole cut out for the toilet, i recall spiders webs and lagging on the pipes which scared me. people took a lot of pride in their houses and Mondays was always the day that the steps got cleaned and a beige chalk stone ( i think it was called a dolly stone) was used to make the steps look nice, my grandma used the same stone on the window sills. people cleaned their yards and would swill out the paths. people may not have had much money but they had their pride.

Date:
21-Mar-2010

Email:
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Name:
Paul Farnill

Comment:
Lyn, This photograph (117) was taken in one of the St Hilda's Streets, almost certainly St Hildas Road, the one with Goodalls off licence at the bottom. The date is circa late fifties/ early sixties. The following photograph (118) is taken outside number 24 Fewston Street around the late forties, early fifties. My father was born at 20 Fewston Street in 1908.

Date:
20-Mar-2011

Email:
paul.farnill@ntlworld.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Anne's comment reminded me that the shovel was always at hand in our house, should any horse and cart come down our back street. Recycling was automatic back then - - - even though the term, as a concept was unknown. Kids today wouldn't believe what managed to get "re-cycled" back in those not so far off days, when fresh food was the order of the day. Nearly everything on Mr. Farnell's cart would have been bought fresh from Leeds Wholesale Vegetable Market. Just about the only processed food you would find in the corner shop would have been a tin of 'processed peas'. You bought peas in pods, back then. With reference to Lyn Facey's reference to the "dolly stone" for scouring the door-step. I always knew it a a "dobby-stone". If you delve into 'Folk-Law History' you will discover that there is a connection between these two words in relation to the door-step/thresh-hold. No doubt other parts of Yorkshire or the rest of the country will have used different words. but whatever they might have been, they would all have been connected, and relate back to the mischievous 'Dobby' or 'Hob".

Date:
21-Feb-2014

Email:
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Name:
june Blakelock

Comment:
This could have been the fruit and veg cart(later a van, I rhink) that was stored in a lock up garage at Hill Top cottages, Knostrop lane, where we lived in the 1950s. My Mum used to have a running battle with mice, drawn to the house, she was sure, by the presence of the greengrocer's van garaged next door to our house. We lived at Hill Top Cottages from about 1955 to about 1960 when we moved to 15,Fewston Street.

Date:
28-Feb-2015

Email:
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Name:
Jacko

Comment:
I'm sure I've backed this nag at some stage.

Date:
11-Aug-2015

Email:
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Name:
John Bean

Comment:
In 1911, 2 of my grandfather's brothers Herbert and Arthur Bean, operated their part of the family business as mobile greengrocers in this way. The census states their occupation, as 'greengrocer who goes out with pony and cart'. Both operated around the Burley and Hyde Park areas of Leeds. Following their father's death in 1918, they and 3 other family members (including their mother) emigrated to Toronto Canada.

Date:
03-Dec-2015

Email:
beanj@btinternet.com

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Name:
Michael Kirby

Comment:
Further to Graham's comments about the 'dobby-stone', I always thought it was 'Donkey Stone', something my mam never used, because our prefab in Seacroft did not have a stone step, although number 1 South Parkway where we lived from the early 60s did have one, but I think the edges had been painted. I remember her using Cardinal polish on the floor tiles in the kitchen though.

Date:
03-Dec-2015

Email:
michaelkirbychow@btinternet.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Harry Farnell, Greengrocer, horse and cart - - - 2007613_163862 - - - Picking up on Michæl Kirby's comment:- Yes Michæl, many people referred to the stone by that particular name - - - it being one of the many dialectic corruptions of the original. Others would know it as the 'scouring-stone', as the action of decorating the door-step was often referred to as 'scouring'. It all depended upon where you lived. No doubt on a country-wide scale, there will be a whole raft of different names, but all will be capable of taking us back through the mists of time, to their origins in ancient traditions and superstitions. Have a look at the comments on I/D. number, 5614.

Date:
06-Mar-2016

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
DOBBY-STONE - For anyone interested:- There are, cut into the side of Sutton Bank, the remains of a 'Dobby-Stone Quarry' from which, up to the late 19th century (and perhaps a little beyond) was being cut, that particular scouring material from which was made, and marketed, the handy blocks which were used for 'scouring' thousands and thousands of door-steps, far and wide. There is a way-marked path from Gormire Lake, which winds its way up the side of the cliff, through this old quarry, and beyond, up to the summit. On reaching the quarry, you are confronted by a huge stone block. An available, small booklet of local walks of that area, describing this walk, tells us that it is a reminder of the quarry which was once extant, and the 'dobby-stones' which were created as the result of the activity there. It would be interesting to learn of any other quarries that produced this particular stone, and what other names, if any, those long gone quarry-men might have used to describe this material.

Date:
08-Mar-2016

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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