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Camp Road, sleeping man.


Camp Road, sleeping man.
Description:
1955. Image shows the living room, which also contains a bed, of a terraced house in Camp Road. It is the home of a young couple and their two children, and was taken to illustrate the poverty and poor living conditions which many people endured in this area at this time. The campaign was an attempt to achieve better housing and was run by Leeds Headteacher, Reggie Marks. The father of the family is asleep on the bed and there are the remains of a meal on the table. There are shells of boiled eggs, slices of bread, jam, fruitcake and bottles of milk. The family have had tea to drink with their meal. The room is lit by a bare light blub hanging from the ceiling. Washing is draped over a washing line strung across the room in front of the window. Photograph courtesy of Terry Cryer.

User Comments:

Name:
jack mitchell

Comment:
And we won the war 10 yrs earlier. I've little doubt that Britain, felt obliged to help repair the damage it had done in Germany, at the expense of the lads who had won the war. 16-Dec-07.

Email:
astrojack7mars@msn.com

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Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
As shocking a scene this may well seem to some, it was all too common to me as a young lad starting work as an apprentice TV engineer in the late 1950's, and being taken into homes just like it. One of the horrors that the photo does not make evident, stems from that light-bulb holder, and the wire dangling away from it. Many a house had only the centre light as a source of electricity, and using the 'double adaptor' seen here, was the only way to power other things such as an iron. Some of these adaptors actually had a switch operated by a string-pull, so that only the bulb could be turned off. Apart from the all to frequent risk of fire caused by the - overloading of the five-amp wiring, and the fitting of an over-rated fuse - the damp walls, and the damp atmosphere, could become charged as electricity leaked through the equally damp fabric covering of the wire itself. Truly shocking, it frequently was!

Date:
29-Jan-2009

Email:
Not displayed

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Name:
Ron Davies

Comment:
I like B. Hallam was an apprentice T.V. engineer in the late 50s and early 60s, and also witnessed this type of scene regularly. Often I would have accompanied a senior engineer on a house call to an affluent area such as Roundhay, Alwoodley or West Park, and then on the next call to witneess a scene like this. It just made you think!!!

Date:
17-Sep-2010

Email:
rondavies66@googlemail.com

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Name:
Chris Went (nee Rhodes)

Comment:
I remember adapters being used on the centre light when we lived with my grandparents in the early 1950s. They lived in a council house in which there was only one wall socket - for the radio. Someone gave my mother an electric iron and it had to be plugged into the light adapter. Inevitably it blew up and she went back to heating up the old flat iron on the fire.

Date:
16-Aug-2011

Email:
madkatsmum@hotmail.co.uk

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This photograph cannot be purchased due to copyright restrictions.