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Park Road from the junction with Meynell Road and Colton Road

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Park Road from the junction with Meynell Road and Colton Road
Description:
c1969. Image shows Park Road from the junction with Meynell Road, left, and Colton Road, right. A sign reads 'No through Road'. There is access via this road to Park House and farm and Colton Farm, as well as other properties. Number 1 Colton Road is on the corner, left, and in the centre Park Road Farm can be seen. The building on the right belongs to Grange Farm.

User Comments:

Name:
Keyholekate

Comment:
Pte Arthur Spencer Dobson Born - Templenewsam, Leeds, 1889 Died - Serre, France. 1st July 1916 Arthur Spencer Dobson was one of four children born to Charles and Mary Dobson in Templenewsam. His siblings were Joseph, Edie and Emma. On the 4th September 1914, whilst working as a warehouseman at Isaac Jowitt Dewhirst, of 32 Kirkgate, Leeds, and living at Meynell Road, Colton, Arthur enlisted into the “Leeds Pals” and posted to “D” Company, 16 platoon, section 13. His Commanding officer was Lt Pope-Smith. On the 1st July 1916, the first day at the battle of the Somme, Pte Arthur Dobson had just gone over the top, when he was severely wounded. Private Arthur Spencer Dobson died of his wounds later that day, and was buried at Queens Cemetery, Puisieux.

Date:
03-Nov-2008

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Name:
David Cockerham

Comment:
When I lived in one of 'The Cottages' further down Meynell Road from the mid-1940s to the mid-1950s the cottage on the corner in this photo was the home of George Calvett, who was a farm labourer on Joe Carrol's farm opposite (in fact he was more or less 'the' farm labourer, apart from Joe and his son Michael). A lovely man, with a glass eye replacing the one he lost cutting an old lady's thorn hedge for her. As a child I 'helped' him - i.e got in his way lot - with his million and one tasks on the farm, including delivering the fresh farm milk to local households by horse and cart, dishing it out from steel churns by 'gill' measures into jugs left on doorsteps. Whenever I made a mess of a task - often - he would say 'Ee lad, tha's like a man med o' band'. I've never heard anyone else use that expression.

Date:
08-Jan-2009

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to David Cockerham's comment. I seem to remember that 'gills' were one third of a pint. Modern thinking tells me that they were halves, but there's a niggle at the back of my mind telling me that they were thirds. I haven't heard the '... man med o'band' expression before, but we had - " ... Tha's framin' like a man wi' no arms." For anyone who fancies a walk, you can access The Temple Newsam Bridle Way, a few hundred yards down Park Road.

Date:
30-Mar-2009

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
David Cockerham

Comment:
With reference to Graham Schofield's comment, now I come to think of it, old George Calvert himself used to say to me 'Nay lad, frame theeself, tha's like a man med o'band'. Just to complicate matters, the Webster's dictionary definition of a gill is one quarter of a pint. It warns that in northern dialect it can mean half a pint, but that is usually with reference to ale, nor milk. My recollection of the stainless steel gill measures with curved handles to hang on the side of the churns that old George used on the Carrol's Farm milk round some 60 years ago is that they were certainly more than one quarter of a pint, so maybe they were half pints.

Date:
25-May-2009

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