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Queen Square, gas lamp

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Queen Square, gas lamp
Description:
2007. View showing a corner of Queen Square with a gas lamp seen in the foreground. This square has been relatively unchanged since Georgian times, having been built in the early 19th century, thought it is now owned by Leeds Metropolitan University. Gas lighting still dominates to this day. The buildings, attached railings and the gas lamp are now Grade II listed. Taken from the book 'When the Streets Were Lit by Gas' by Philip Croft Tordoff.

User Comments:

Name:
brian thomas

Comment:
Used to go to Printing College in Queens Square 1955 to 1960 then it moved to a brand new building round the corner off Woodhouse Lane.I was apprenticed to a firm called Gilchrist Bros, which overlooked this Square (Very happy days). We used to play Snooker and billiards in the 'Manchester Union of Oddfellows' building also in the Square.I wonder if it is still there.

Date:
31-Dec-2008

Email:
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Name:
Michael Kirby

Comment:
I'm surprised that Brian did not mention number 10 Queen Square, which was the offices of the Typographical Society. Although working at Gilchrists he may have been in the lithographers union or perhaps SLADE. I remember having to attended a meeting of the Branch Committee, as an aspiring apprentice compositor in 1962. Before an apprentice could start in the print trade back then, we had to sit an exam, general knowledge, English and Science questions. I think this took place in the Youth Employment office, near where Millenium Square is now. When the exam was over all the entrants were given a colour blind test and several participants failed this and were sent home. I could never understand why they did not do the test first rather than letting someone sit a two hour exam for nothing. Once through this part of the process, the next thing was an interview by the TA branch committee. The union was part of a 3 party system of selecting suitable entrants to the trade: the union, the employers federation and the print colleges. I remember the committee room being very dark and gloomy, with a dozen or so mainly elderly dour faced gentlemen, who quized me as to why I wanted to join them in the printing trade. I remember being very scared, I was just 15, but I must have said the right things because I was allowed to look for an apprenticeship. The branch secretary back then was called, David Hall. He was followed by Ernest Heald, who reminded me of Captain Pugwash. The TA amalgamated with The London Society of Compositors in 1964 and became the NGA, the Lithography union joined (transfer of engagements?) 1967. After further and numerous amalgamations and tranfers of engagements the union is no a sector within Unite. I bet those old boys on the TA Branch Committee are turning in their graves!

Date:
19-Jan-2009

Email:
mike@bookcraft.co.uk

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Name:
brian thomas

Comment:
Michael Kirkby is right in his assumption, I was a member of SLADE (Society of Graphic Artists and Engravers) My Dad was in the TA for eons until it all merged into the NGA (National Graphical Assc.) I remember David Hall and Ernest Heald as Branch Secs. When I started in 1955 my wage was £1.00 for a 40 hour week. We were amongst the first apprentices to be paid anything. Apprentices used to pay the firm for the honour of learning the trade and relied on tips from assisting the Journeymen. Minimum wage for a journeyman in 1955 was £12 - fifteen shillings a week. TA rates were around £8.00 but they worked 5 hours longer 45 per week.

Date:
21-Jan-2009

Email:
jetsdad@mac.com

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