leodis logo

Leeds City Council

Open archives compliant site

Supported by BIG Lottery Fund

Enrich UK Lottery Fund

Hyde Park Corner, from Woodhouse Lane


Hyde Park Corner, from Woodhouse Lane
Description:
Undated Looking towards Hyde Park Corner from Woodhouse Lane, taken around the late 1940s or 1950s. On the left is the edge of Woodhouse Moor, then the first n a terrace of shops is Yates' confectioner at no.22 Hyde Park Corner. On the right are nos.1-5 Hyde Park Corner; no.1 nearest is Frank Palmer, motor engineer; no.2 W. Michel, pastrycook; and no.5 on the end is Harold Roberts, butcher. Beyond the junction with Woodhouse Street is the Hyde Park public house.

User Comments:

Name:
Christian Liits

Comment:
The premises of W. Michel were owned by Mr Arthur Goodall.

Date:
23-Jul-2009

Email:
liits@hotmail.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
This is definitely a 1940's photograph, and a scene of Hyde Park corner that is unimaginable to those familiar with it today. It was likely taken on a Sunday judging by the lack of any moving traffic. The latter largely being the result of the wartime restrictions on personal transport fuel. But even by the early 1960's, this crossroads had become a famed bottleneck that I negotiated every day as a driver. In 1942, I was born to unmarried young runaways in the attic of a terrace house only a few hundred yards away down Hyde Park Road, but was immediately whisked away back to Doncaster where my parents were from. That event alone however, has nothing to do with the nostalgia of this photograph for me. It has more to do with my early childhood in the later 1940's, and that shop on the left. In 1944, I was brought back to Leeds to live in the Burmantofts streets opposite St James's hospital, and whilst it is now a hardly credible concept, my parents would take me on Sunday afternoon tram rides to this exact spot ... one may well wonder what on Earth was the attraction? And the answer was 'For sale'..!! That's the heading found on those free 'For sale' postcards seen now in supermarkets and some shop-windows. But back in the 1940's, such were big business because people were in post-war employment, earning money, but there was nothing in the shops to buy ... second-hand anything had value, and that little shop was then a nucleus for such adverts. My first 'coach-built' pram - of which my parents were so proud, came from an advert placed at that shop. Doubtless my parents had become familiar with the location during the months prior to my arrival, and had something of a soft-spot for it. So spending a few pennies on a couple of tram rides, on a Sunday afternoon nostalgic jaunt to this place, wasn't really that silly. It was simple times, during which simple folk, had simple pleasures.

Date:
24-Mar-2011

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Ruth Ling

Comment:
B Hallam - what a lovely story! I know that shop well - my family lived nearby, in Ash Grove, for six years, and I also lived for a while in Hyde Park Terrace.

Date:
23-Aug-2012

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

This photograph cannot be purchased due to copyright restrictions.