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Hook Moor Crossroads, postcard view.

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Hook Moor Crossroads, postcard view.
Description:
Undated. Early black and white postcard showing Hook Moor Crossroads. The view looks south and is the meeting of old 18th and 19th century turnpikes. In the background, at the left edge, is the Boroughbridge & Ferrybridge turnpike (Ermine Street) of 1741. The Wakefield - Aberford Turnpike is seen in the foreground at the left edge, dating from 1789 and Barnsdale/Leeds to Hook Moor Turnpike is in the background, right, of 1828. In 1962 the Aberford Bypass opened and the A1/M1 link road was constructed in 1990s.

User Comments:

Name:
B Hallam

Comment:
In the 1950's, Hook Moor was a popular spot - on warm Sunday afternoons, for picnics and traffic watching. At that time, cars as personal transport were very rare, many being quite old, unreliable, and slow. Hook Moor was an open-space at the side of the 'Great North Road (A1)' situated at the Southern end of Aberford Village through which the road passed. It might sound completely daft now, but there was such a thing as 'car spotting' back then. People would wave at the passing cars, and would often get a wave back from passagers. Certain cars - especially really old ones, would get a rousing-cheer. It should be noted of course, that - prior to the 1960's - the A1 (Great North Road) was largely a single-carriageway road that passed through lots of villages (like Aberford) that were yet to be by-passed. For me - as a child, a trip to Hook Moor was a real treat. The area is still there, but is little more than a Motorway embankment.

Date:
02-Jul-2009

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Name:
Mick Agar

Comment:
We moved to Castleford from Leeds when I was 9 in 1954, and my memories are similar to B Hallam. In my teens I did a lot of cycling in that area, sometimes with my father, Frank. One of the farmers from Barnsdale Road (the road to Cas) had a caravan converted to sell refreshments and he did a roaring trade at Hook Moor - not so much from passing traffic as from the locals who parked there to watch it. My father used to like the tea there, even though it was strong enough to stand a spoon in. It's really almost impossible to explain how light the traffic was on the A1 in those days, especially on Sundays. Riding up the longish drag from Aberford past the almshouses, it would be a look over the shoulder just in case something was coming, then arm out and out into the middle of the road for the right turn, which was actually straght on following the roman road. After tea on a Sunday evening traffic was even lighter, you could sometimes ride for several minutes without seeing a vehicle. The A1 did pass through a lot of places many beginning with "B" Boroughbridge, Bramham, Bawtry, Baldock, Biggleswade, only (in)famous for being bottlenecks on the A1.

Date:
15-Oct-2009

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Name:
Bob Milner

Comment:
I cycled this way a good deal in 1941-4.Hook Moor was much frequented by gypsies,whose caravans were a picturesque sight drawn in among the trees.Ponies grazing happily, kids playing,smoke from camp fires curling gently about,while adults sat making clothes pegs and suchlike to sell.A sad loss...

Date:
25-Nov-2009

Email:
bobmilner26@googlemail.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
Yes, I have to concur with the above three comments. Hook Moor was something of a magnet to many people. In many respects, I don't know why. There was nothing there but grass, trees, and of course the cross-roads. But for all that, it was a very popular destination on warm sunny days. It was one of the places that me and my mates headed for when we became old enough to be allowed to venture far, on our 'Raleighs', 'Rudge's', or whatever bikes our parents had got for us. I remember, mine was a 'Hercules'. Only very recently my wife discovered an old school-book containing an essay that she, along with others in her class, had had to write, about a school trip from south of Leeds to Filey, via York. I had to smile when I read that the bus had made its first stop at Hook Moor. So it seems that this venue was famous from as far afield as Heckmondwike. From what Mr. Hallam says, I would probably find the area totally unrecognisable today. We have the A1(M) now, and it will be hard, if not impossible for younger generations to even begin to contemplate what the A1 was actually like to drive, or cycle on back then. But there are stretches of the old road which will take you back in time - (well, more or less). Between Junctions 47 and 49 on the A1(M) you can drive parallel to the new road and experience what it was like back then. The road is listed as the A168, but for me, that stretch is what is left of the old A1.

Date:
25-Oct-2013

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