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Churwell, two maps showing 'before' and 'after' the building of the railway viaduct

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Churwell, two maps showing
Description:
c1900. Image shows two maps of Churwell showing 'before' (top) and 'after' (bottom) the building of the railway viaduct. Construction of the railway line began in 1845. The viaduct is built on foundations that are three metres deep and it runs for 65 metres in length. There are six arches of which some reach a height of 15 metres. The Yorkshire gritstone blocks used to build the viaduct each weigh 10cwt. The railway viaduct crosses Elland Road at the bottom of Churwell Hill, (bottom map, right) and Churwell Station can be seen, which closed in 1940. Description of both maps follows: Top Map: From left to right along Roman Road, shown in red: Zion Chapel, Commercial Inn, Nowells Farm, Point Hall, Inn (on left bend of 'U' shape), Old Chapel 1829, Old Golden Fleece, Croft Farm (on right bend of 'U' shape), Manor Farm. At the very right edge there is a word that is possibly part of 'Nunnery'. The route marked with dots is the 'path of Elland Road". Bottom Map: From left to right: Zion Chapel, Toll Bar, Commercial Inn, Town Hall. The 'U' shape is made up of Victoria Street, left, Back Green, bottom, Little Lane, right. To left of 'U' shape is Point Hall. Bottom right corner of 'U' is Croft Farm. Little Lane continues to become Pump Hill, then Old Road, & Manor Farm is next to the railway line. Elland Road cuts across the centre and Shool (School ?) Street runs between Old Road and Elland Road. The railway line has been built and Churwell Station is marked next to Elland Road. Toll Bar visible towards the right -hand side. Parts of the remaining original Roman Road are marked in red. Photograph from the David Atkinson Archive.

User Comments:

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
There is a point of interest here. This image shows the lay of the land as at different times, along with a name change to one of the roads. - - - 'Roman Road' has become, 'Old Road'. The lower map shows the proposed new and more direct route through this part of Churwell, as a white strip, and when completed it would have rendered 'Roman Road' as partly redundant, to gradually become regarded as the old road as compared to the new one. This no doubt explains the seemingly official name-change. My question is, Where did the name 'Roman Road' come from? How did it originate? Was it named as such because there had been evidence of a genuine 'roman road' there at one time, or could its origins be associated with Gypsies (Romanies) who may have congregated, and camped in that particular area on a regular basis, in the past. It would be interesting to learn the origin of this particular road-name.

Date:
11-Dec-2016

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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