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Aerial view of railway lines and stations

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Aerial view of railway lines and stations
Description:
17th September 1962. Aerial view of railway lines and stations. In the centre of the bottom edge is Leeds Corporation Gas Department, and above it the lozenge shape is Holbeck Station (1855-1958). Above the centre, towards the top edge, are the two main railway stations with the River Aire and Leeds and Liverpool Canal looping round between. On the left is Leeds Central Station (1848-1967) and on the right is Leeds City Station formed in 1938 on the merger of Leeds Wellington Station and Leeds New Station. Cutting across the bottom left-hand corner is Wellington Road. Next Gelderd Junction on Wellington Road is the Grade II listed circular building, the Round House, opened by the Leeds & Thirsk railway in 1847. In the centre of the left edge is Bean Ing Mill, demolished in the 1960s and now the site of the Yorkshire Post building. The Town Hall is just visible a little way down from the top left edge. Wellington Street runs diagonally across the top left hand corner from the centre of the left edge.

User Comments:

Name:
Tony Carroll

Comment:
The factory complex, just to the right of centre (mainly with white roofs) and located between various railway lines and the canal/river, was the site of Monkbridge Forge which occupied both sides of Whitehall Road and had been on the site for many years. In the 1960s, 70s, 80s and 90s this was where most of the original precision forgings of gas-turbine blades for nearly all the jet engines made in Britain were made. These engines powered many UK aircraft, including Concorde. I worked there for about 4 years in the late 1960s as a technician. It was an extremely interesting, but very noisy and dirty, place where I gained a lot of technical experience as much of the technology they used was world-leading, although much of the premises were very old. In the large, black roofed, shed next to the railway were some of the most powerful and advanced presses in the world, (at the time), yet in a small building near the tall chimney was a very ancient steam-hammer, possibly from Victorian times. This was used infrequently, usually by a team of men who came from Sheffield, to forge large one-off items. The technicians workshop was located in one of the arches of the viaduct, just under the uppermost tip of the Holbeck Station platform. The whole of this site was cleared a few years ago, and now most of it is empty. Some multi-storey developments were planned for the site, but only one (currently standing empty in April-2011) have so far been built.

Date:
27-Apr-2011

Email:
oldgent@gmail.com

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Name:
Stuart Clapham

Comment:
Further to tony,s comment. My wife and I worked at Monkbridge for nearly 30 years leaving when it closed in 2005. Prior to that it had been purchased by speculators most notable the Royal bank of Scotland.

Date:
08-Feb-2013

Email:
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Name:
Norman Waddock

Comment:
This photograph brought back many memories. About this time I worked at SKW Motors. I believe the road it was situated on was called Telavera Street/Road. At the bottom/centre of the photograph there is a gasometer. In front of that there is a long building and immediately behind that a triangular area. Telavera St ran through the middle of this triangle at least up to the viaduct. There were three businesses on Telavera St. Cox's Scrap Yard was the first one (I believe his Christian name was George? - a short, strong man. He could hold on to a lamp post with both hands and lift his body at right-angles to the lamp post and keep it there. I have never, in my life time, seen anybody else who could do this.) If you look to the right of the long building in front of the gasometer you can see part of a small building which was Cox's offices and his yard was to the right of that. Next to the yard was SKW Motors and next to SKW Motors was a business involved (I believe) in recycling old sacks - the place was full of rats! It would be good to get some feedback regarding my comments.

Date:
12-Jun-2014

Email:
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