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Prices Tailors Ltd., Cardigan Crescent

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Prices Tailors Ltd., Cardigan Crescent
Description:
Undated. Aerial view of Prices Tailors Ltd. located off number 299 Kirkstall Road on Cardigan Crescent. This is a huge complex stretching as far as the River Aire which is towards the top edge. At the bottom edge red brick streets of back-to-back housing are visible in the Lennox's and the Roseberry's. Red brick streets coming in from the right-hand side are off Kirkstall Road and are, from the top, Cardigan Mount, Cardigan View, Cardigan Crescent and Cardigan Row. Above and to the right of these streets is an area of open ground, the last vestige of the original Cardigan Fields and known to locals simply as "the field". Prices Tailors Ltd was founded in Leeds in 1905 by Henry Price (1877-1963). This factory was built in 1923 in Lennox Road but was extended as far as Cardigan Crescent in the 1930s. In 1932 the firm became known as the Fifty Shilling Tailors. Mass production meant that the price of a suit at 50 shillings had become affordable to the working man, but, in 1935 the value of 50 shillings (£2.50) was around the equivalent of £90 in todays money. Henry Price had over 500 shops and several factories employing 12,000 staff. On his retirement in 1954 he sold the firm to John Collier. The site of the clothing factory is now that of Cardigan Fields Leisure and Entertainment Complex.

User Comments:

Name:
Melanie (Wortley)

Comment:
My grandad, Norman Heseltine, worked here for many years, even after it became part of UDS. He was a cutter and could cut a suit out at the speed of light. He was made redundant in the late 70,s when it became cheaper to buy imported suits

Date:
14-Feb-2012

Email:
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Name:
John Bean

Comment:
My father Walter Bean, worked here from leaving school(1929) to retirement. He was the secretary of the company angling club for approximately half of his time there. He was awarded the usual company long service award at 25 years service, I still have the engraved mantle clock he was awarded in 1954 by the then company 'Prices Tailors'.

Date:
15-Feb-2012

Email:
beanj@btinternet.com

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Name:
Ian Ackroyd

Comment:
These are indeed back to backs, the street of houses facing the open land (with pathways forming a cross) was actualy Cardigan Terrace, I lived at number 103, third house from the top, from my birth in the mid 50's until the mid 60's, along with the rest of my family, obviously being back to backs the roadway between the two visible streets was Cardigan Mount. The field opposite our house had never had houses on it in either my time, nor that of my parents both had also lived in these street of houses during their childhoods. The Tailoring factory was as described all part of the John Collier enpire, but was still always know locally as Prices,I have great memories of all of these streets, Cardigan fields, and all of the local people during the fifties and sixties.

Date:
15-Feb-2012

Email:
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Name:
R.Hudson

Comment:
I started work here in the postroom, right at the very top of the main building,1960 I think, Mr.Haley was the manager in what was called the counting house. I loved it and used to deliver the mail everywhere in this great picture. Miss Johnson was Mr.Haley's secretary and I remember Mrs. Pollard and a lovely lady we all called Tinker both worked in the postroom, I started work there with a girl called Pat, happy days!

Date:
17-Feb-2012

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Name:
John Bean

Comment:
My mum Emily Bean, also worked here, when it had become John Colliers. She was a supervisor in the machinist workshops, the lower buildings in this view. She generally taught young starters how to sew up jackets and trousers etc.

Date:
18-Feb-2012

Email:
beanj@btinternet.com

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Name:
Tony Carroll

Comment:
My late wife's aunt, Dorothy Murphy worked at Price's for some years as, as far as I remember, a nurse, looking after the mnor ailments, accidents etc of the workforce. She spoke quite often of enjoying being there. Unfortunately she died many years ago, still quite young. Her death upset my late wife quite a lot as they were good friends, being quite close in age although being Aunt and Niece.

Date:
22-Feb-2012

Email:
thecarrolls@sky.com

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Name:
Allen

Comment:
I lived in Cardigan road with my family in the late 60s/early70s me an my sister climbed onto the roof of this factory to get our ball an we decided to play duffs jumping from one section of the roof onto the next section my older sister insisted on going first we didn't get any further as she went straight through the roof into the the factory a night duty man saw her an brought her out ,luckly she landed on material and not a machine we but don't see the dangers as kids I'm so glad I still got my older sister "maybe that's the reason she had a bad back all her life"

Date:
24-Feb-2012

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Name:
rayd

Comment:
My first job, leaving school at 14, was in No 2 cutting room at Price's I only stayed about nine months and never worked in a factory again. My late brother started in Price's garage about 1938 and remained until his retirement.

Date:
02-Mar-2012

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Name:
Mick Agar

Comment:
My late father, Frank Agar, worked in an office here for a short time after he had been made redundant at WE Yates in Bramley in 1975. Although he was never well-off, he used to treat himself by having his suits made by Bernard Reiss in Albion Street. The Prince of Wales made a visit to Leeds which included a tour of this firm. He admired my dear old dad's suit and asked if he had bought it there. He explained quite forcefully that he had not and I remember hearing this incident mentioned in a radio Leeds news report of the Prince's visit. As soon as I heard what had happened, I knew it must have been him. We have an official photograph of the Prince talking to him with a couple of the bosses looking shocked in the background. He was soon looking for another job; although I am not sure if this incident played a part, it cannot have helped.

Date:
14-Mar-2012

Email:
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Name:
Rob Clark

Comment:
My Dad, Dennis Clark worked here, first as the post boy for Sir Henry Price, who apparently had great plans for dad, however he then moved to be a tailors cutter (he wanted to be with his mates) up to 1942. He then went to war & returned in 1946 & came back to Prices for a few years, before setting up in the market trade. Dad was a keen angler & often went on the Prices club fishing matches. He is still going strong at 87 & has many fond memories of his days at Prices.

Date:
16-Jul-2012

Email:
b.clark@tritonconstruction.co.uk

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Name:
Tony Watson

Comment:
Does anybody remember those wonderful children's christmas parties they used to have?. They were for employees children really, but I lived in Cardigan Crescent and the company used to invite all the children who lived in that street to the parties as compensation for all the big lorries that used to go up and down the street with deliveries. The parties were great, lots of fun and games and a Christmas dinner, then on the way out, after meeting Santa, we all lined up to get our presses. I know one or two of the craftier kids, after getting their prissy, would sneak back into the queue to get another one! (Not that I ever did - honest :-)). I used to play on Cardigan Fields as a lad. My grandma lived in Cardigan Terrace, number 95. Further across to the right of the picture was the river Aire and we used to wander down there to play - this would be considered quite dangerous now, but then we though nothing of it. This was from round about the early 1950s to late 1950s. Happy Days!

Date:
28-Jul-2012

Email:
tonywatson@mac.com

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Name:
Christine Short nee Noble

Comment:
To R.Hudson, I too started my working life in the postroom at Prices in 1964, Mrs Pollard was still working there then but I don't remember the Man's name that was in charge, I then went on to work as an acounting machine operator where we used to do all the wages for the branches around the Country. To Tony Watson, I also remember the wonderful Christmas parties because my Mother, Violet Noble worked in the factory when I was young, lovely memories.

Date:
19-Oct-2012

Email:
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Name:
Brenda Scott nee Johnson

Comment:
As a child I lived on Roseberry Place, one of the streets at the bottom edge of this photo. I had NO idea, as a child, just how huge Price's ( as we called it ) was! All these streets, the Roseberrys and the Lennox's were effectively cul-de-sacs as Prices abutted one end and there was a sliding door presumably for the workers to get some air when occasion demanded. I remember these doors being slid open at dinner-time and the sound of 'Workers Playtime' being played through a tannoy. There's a photo of me somewhere on Leodis, and the Prices doorway can easily be seen in the background. I can't remember the photo number but it's Roseberry Place, possibly numbers9 > 15.

Date:
02-Dec-2012

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Name:
joyce hewitt nee Lee

Comment:
My Mother worked at prices all through the war years,she was a great machinist, and a "Top Hand" and worked very hard making uniforms, she told us that women used to put the occasional notes in the jacket pockets,saying good luck,God bless.Also how scary it was in the blackouts, especially being situated near the river, as the german bombers followed the route of the rivers.

Date:
02-Dec-2012

Email:
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Name:
Eamonn

Comment:
Not only do I remember Prices , I remember Tony Watson too, Us lads used to play on the waterfall (weir) at the back of the factory. I lived in Evanston Avenue and often played on the waste gound in photo.

Date:
23-Sep-2013

Email:
eamonn.cronin@sky.com

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Name:
Mark Smith

Comment:
My grandad,Frank Taylor,was a cutter here 40's and 50's and he lived in Cardigan Mount and later Martin Terrace

Date:
23-Mar-2014

Email:
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