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Dewsbury Road, looking north


Dewsbury Road, looking north
Description:
c1964. This photograph was taken standing in the garden of 254 Dewsbury Road (former surgery of Mr. H.W. Freer Dental Surgeon) about the end of 1964. It is taken across Dewsbury Road looking north towards the city centre. The large area of pavement in the foreground was the queueing area for the Pavilion Picture House which had closed down long before (in 1956). The side road on the left with a man walking up it is Rowland Road, then beyond the wall is no.244 Dewsbury Road, an end terrace belonging to Mrs. Jane Stocks who owned a flower and greengrocers shop just out of shot on the right (her son Barrie Stocks later opened another further up the road). The shop with the clock (first on the right) was a children's and ladies wear shop called Edna Louise. It had been here for over a decade and was known for fitted suits and quality dresses and hats. After the junction with Tunstall Road is a parade of shops numbered (from right) 217 to 207 Dewsbury Road, which include a fresh bread shop selling pastries and 'foreign' breads, and a herbalist run by Mr. Joe Hogan. Also in the parade are Senior's Butchers, Servo, J. Coombes & Co. Ltd, shoe repairers and H. Seal Ltd., painters and decorators. Following on from these is a Mobil garage selling petrol and cars, then the Methodist Church. Photograph and information courtesy of Noel Freer.

User Comments:

Name:
Chris Went (nee Rhodes)

Comment:
Edna Louise did indeed sell high quality ladies' and childrens' clothes. My mother bought some of mine there around 1950. I remember one winter outfit which consisted of a woollen cloth coat with matching bonnet and leggings. It must have been very expensive. I hated being dressed in the leggings which fastened down the insides of the legs with tinhy buttons. I would have been about three years old.

Date:
27-Jul-2012

Email:
madkatsmum@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
donald rhodes

Comment:
i spent many an hour queuing on the area in front of the pavilion cinema to gain entry.usually half way through the movie,this in the 1950s60s. i now wonder why no one ever erected a cover for the rain?? i dont recall there being one here,but further up dewsbury road,the cresent cinema had such a cover. at the pav i often would look in their rubbish bins for snips of 35mm film,and i still have them here in OZ. one such movie was WALK A CROOKED MILE. i think the bottom of rowland road is just visible on the left,near the zebra crossing.

Date:
23-Aug-2012

Email:
donrhodes@pac.com.au

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Name:
John Green

Comment:
There was a greengrocers shop in the 1930s though whether it was exactly where Mrs Stocks was in the 60s I cannot be sure. In those days we children could buy dried liquorice sticks at chemists or sweet shops. However liquorice was still being grown around Pontefract and for a short time each year there were bundles of thin roots, about 5mm diameter and 50 cm long hanging from a hook over the shop doorway. The attraction was the sweet taste of the liquorice, the fresh roots were much easier to chew than the dry sticks. Seal's is mentioned - was that not taken over by Paul Madeley the Leeds United footballer? My brother was very friendly with the son of the owner of the garage just beyond that shot and young Mr Wright made the first radiogram we ever owned. It was built into the sawn-off bottom half of a piano, lasted for years. The kid's show at the Pavilion was on Saturday morning, at the Crescent Saturday afternoon, price Pavilion 1d, Crescent 2d. My brother and I got into bad company, an older boy we met at the Pavilion told us how easy it was to steal from the displays in front of the counter at Boots, just a bit further south on the parade of shops on the right of the pic. Probably about eight and six years old we brightly shared this intelligence with our mother. We were given a serious talk and then an extra penny. The Crescent was altogether a better option, softer seats and, as pointed out, the area for the queue was undercover.

Date:
06-Feb-2014

Email:
Not displayed

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
My local picture-house was "The Beeston". As kids we would go along to the 'matinees' there on a Saturday afternoon. Am I correct in remembering that the 'matinees' at "The Pavilion" were held on Saturday mornings? Can anyone confirm this? Thinks:- I wonder if blue was the 'in colour' back in 1964.

Date:
19-Mar-2014

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

________________________________________________________________________________

Name:
John Milner

Comment:
My local picture-house was the Malvern , it used-to get packed ,half-the time I couldn't see ,cos there always was a tall man in front of me , us kids when't to the picture-house to see the matinees on topmoore side and the queens, at the verry bottom of dewsbury road ,with torchy en flash-gorden what-times, I lived in weldon street till I was 17.

Date:
26-Oct-2014

Email:
annemilner60@hotmail.co.uk

________________________________________________________________________________

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