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Headingley Castle


Headingley Castle
Description:
June 1967. Front view of Headingley Castle off Headingley Lane. Headingley Castle was originally set in 22 acres. It was built on land bought from Barbara Marshall and designed in 1840 by architect John Child for wealthy corn merchant Thomas England Esq. Child's design employs fire-proofing construction techniques and makes extensive use of cast-iron. Minor alterations were made to the fabric in the late 1860s. The Tudor-Gothic villa was originally known as "The Elms". From 1866, the estate was the family home of Unitarian minister Arthur Lupton (1817-1881). The Luptons of Leeds were landed gentry; a political and business dynasty. Arthur's family built surrounding houses along the Spring Road border of the Headingley Castle estate. Arthur's son was Professor Sir Arnold Lupton (1846-1930) - mining engineer, academic, pacifist and a Member of Parliament (MP). He was a member of the Order of St John. In 1906, Professor Lupton (of Mining Engineering at Leeds University), was elected as the Member of Parliament for the Sleaford division of Lincolnshire. As a Liberal politician, Lupton had a commitment to Free Trade. During World War One, he was suspected by Conservative politician Sir George Cockerill of "being in the pay of Germany". The press had reported concerns that Lupton had benefitted financially ("Trading with the Enemy Act"), courtesy of his mining syndicates, and that he was also running an espionage ring. Lupton's pacifist activities included speaking at the 1917 Leeds Convention and the printing and distribution of anti-war pamphlets. Breaching the regulations of the "Defence of the Realm Act 1914" resulted in his prosecution and a subsequent jail sentence, the justice of which was debated in the House of Commons. In February 1918, The New York Times reported that Lupton had been sentenced to six months imprisonment. A jail sentence was also the fate of his comrade - fellow pacifist and philosopher, Bertrand Russell. By 1909, Headingley Castle was the home of millionaire Frank H. Fulford (1868-1943), the antiquarian and owner of the Bile Bean Manufacturing Co. Leeds. The house was converted into a school for the blind c1970 but this closed in 1993. Headingley Castle's description is taken from - Historic building report: Headingley Castle, Headingley Lane, Leeds. - published by the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, Swindon : National Monuments Record Centre, August 1996. The building was offered for sale by Leeds City Council Development Agency in 2000.

User Comments:

Name:
anna

Comment:
Headingley Castle has now been converted into luxary apartments and coach houses but it is listed so the outside stays much the same.

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Name:
sandra stevenson

Comment:
While they were converting the castle into a school for the blind 1963 my mother was the caretaker.We had three rooms at the back of the castle I loved roaming around the old place.I used to go down to the huge wine cellar and I found old books and other interesting things.I used to go sun bathing on the flat part of the castle roof where I could see all the beautiful daffodils covering the grounds.There was a wonderful iron and glass conservatory to the right of the building.There was 4 stables at the back which had been converted into garages.While I lived there in 1963 I had my wedding reception there in one of the rooms with a beautiful high ceiling.I have lots of fond memories of my life in Headingly Castle.

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Name:
Sheila Jolley (nee Edmondson)

Comment:
My father was a chauffeur in the 1950's to Colonel Jackson who resident in the castle, we lived in the cottages just on the edge of the drive to the castle. My brother & I were only between 2 & 5 but we still remember a lot of the details & have many fond memories.

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Name:
Maureen Kershaw

Comment:
Around the late 50's/early 60's (memory a little blurred!) I use to visit the Castle with my family friends Pat & Janet Lewis. Their Father Arthur Lewis was a friend of Ken Mallinson who worked for the Colonel. I think Ken's wife was called Vera and when we visited them at their cottage in the grounds, we were taken into the Castle kitchen for a glass of milk and biscuits. The ceilings were very high and there was a highly polished smell about the place. We felt like royalty there!

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Name:
John Maun

Comment:
The description 'School for the Blind' is not quite accurate. It was a College run by the North Regional Association for the Blind to teach students a variety of skills to go on and teach visually impaired people to live normal lives. I attended the College in 1986, whilst employed by a local authority in the Midlands, and the course was part sponsored by the Department of Health and my employer. I studied to become a Technical Officer for the Blind and Partially Sighted learning such skills as kitchen and daily living, Braille, Moon and typing and indoor mobility using a 'Guide' cane. In turn I studied how to teach visually impaired people these skills. At the time the College also taught students how to teach the very specialist 'Long Cane Orientation and Mobility training course' which, over many years, has enabled people with very limited vision or no vision at all to move independently in known environments. Students came from all over the British Isles and other countries, notably Australia and New Zealand. When I was at Headingly Castle the Principal was Frank Castle. I have fond memories of the building and the tutors. The weather at the start of that year was appalling with heavy snow and freezing temperatures. I am pleased to see that the building is still standing but regret in some respects that it has been split into apartments, as I would have dearly liked to revisit it in its entirety when my son starts at University in Leeds later on in the year (2009). For the residents of the apartments at the Castle

Date:
20-Feb-2009

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Name:
Jenny Roach (Nee Hart)

Comment:
I was a student at Headingley Castle in 1971/2. They had just changed from running a 'Home Teacher of the Blind' course to a 'Social Welfare Officer for the Blind' qualification.I remember working and studying very hard! Very demanding but caring and supportive tutors. The classrooms were previously the bedrooms. Students were not allowed to use the main staircase which was very grand...we had to use the back stairs. I have very fond memories of Headingley...the fish and chip shop was one of our favourite places!

Date:
29-Dec-2011

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Name:
Chris Tarpey

Comment:
My Grandad, Maurice Hewitt, was the gardner at Headingley Castle in the 1950's & early 1960's. He and my Grandma, Eva, lived in the cottage which was at the entrance to the drive and is still there (a different entrance is used now). Behind their cottage was a delightful daffodil wood. I do remember talk of the Catle being haunted but have no details.

Date:
26-Jun-2012

Email:
christarpey@tiscali.co.uk

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