leodis logo

Leeds City Council

Open archives compliant site

Supported by BIG Lottery Fund

Enrich UK Lottery Fund

Results Found (33), Result Page (1 of 7)
Search Aspect (GILES )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
A young boy models a Hussar overcoat for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. In this image a young boy models a Hussar overcoat made by the clothing manufacturing firm John Barran & Sons. At the time of the photograph, the firm was located in a building designed by Thomas Ambler and completed in 1877, in St.Paul's Street with views onto the Georgian Park Square. There was also an additional factory built in 1888 in Hanover Lane as the company expanded over the years. Clothing manufactured for boys was a major part of Barran's business and orders for these ready-to-wear, miniature suits and coats arrived from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. Some of the clothes were designed as fancy dress, for example, pirate's costumes, guardsman's and beefeater's uniforms. The young 'model' is Herbert Giles (b.1885) who was the son of Arthur Giles, a sewing machine fitter (machine smith) at John Barran's. on the 1891 Census Herbert was listed with his family at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet.
[internal reference; 2009921_169416:LEO 4406a]
[2]
A young boy models a sailor suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. A little boy dressed in a Sailor Suit poses for the camera for the firm of clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. The trade in ready-to-wear tailoring for boys was an important part of the business at this time. The Sailor Suit was popular but there was also a demand for fancy dress and these were exported to Canada, Austrailia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. The boy in this image is is Herbert, whose father was a Machine Smith employed by Barran's, name of Arthur Giles. The Giles family are listed on the 1891 Census as living at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet. John Barran began his career in Leeds at the age of 22 with a small shop at number 30 Bridge End South. By 1851 he had moved to number 1 Briggate but his recognition of the potential of the new American invention of the sewing machine led him to opening a factory in Alfred Street. The business really took off when he worked with the firm of Greenwood and Batley to produce the band knife for bulk pattern cutting. The rapid expansion of the ready-to-wear business for Barran's in Leeds meant several moves. By the time the new warehouse in Chorley Lane opened in 1904, which adjoined the factory of 1888 in Hanover Lane, 3,000 people were in the employment of John Barran & Sons.
[internal reference; 2009921_169418:LEO 4408]
[3]
A young boy models a suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. Image shows a young boy modelling a light-coloured suit with metal buttons and a waistcoat beneath, made by the clothing manufacturing firm of John Barran & Sons. The young boy is Walter Giles, born in 1880 at number 4 Waverley Street in Holbeck. He is the son of an employee of Barran's, a Machine Smith by the name of Arthur Giles. There was, at this time, a successful export trade in young boys' tailored clothing and a demand for miniature soldier's and sailor's uniforms and fancy dress. By 1891 John Barran's had a warehouse in an innovative building in St. Paul's Street, designed by Thomas Ambler and completed in 1877, now known as St. Paul's House. The firm also had a recently opened factory in Hanover Lane (1888). Later, in 1904, a further warehouse was built in Chorley Lane adjoining the Hanover Lane premises. By this time Barran's was employing 3,000 people, many of them women and young girls. The rapid growth of ready -to-wear tailoring business was due to the advancement in technology of such proccesses as pattern-cutting and sewing by machine, including blind stitching, button holing and buttoning.
[internal reference; 2009921_169417:LEO 4409]
[4]
Adel Church, Chancel Arch, East Window, Interior (Adel)
Black & White image1816 View shows the impressive Chancel Arch in Adel Church. The doorway is made up of three arches with the innermost one decorated with chevrons. Moving outwards, the centre arch has raised rectangular panels. The outer arch is, however, by far the most impressive. Thirty seven carved heads adorn the arch, each one different. The faces pictured are either cannibals, gentlemen, animals or multi-headed monsters. Through the arch is the altar. On the east wall are three paintings surrounding the window. The paintings by Dutch artist Van der Bank were given to the church by the Rector William Jackson in 1745. The window in the centre was installed in 1681 and hand painted by Henry Giles of York. The window contains the lion and the unicorn with the coats of arms of King Charles II, Henry Athington, William Breary and Thomas Kirke.
[internal reference; 20031118_92060489:N LIJ Adel (34)]
[5]
General Post Office Building, City Square (City Centre)
Colour imageUndated. Image shows the General Post Office building in City Square. Some of the six red K6 telephone kiosks are visible in front. They were designed by Sir Giles Scott in 1935 and are now listed. The building opened in April 1896 and was built at a cost of £75,000 on designs by Sir Henry Tanner. Photograph courtesy of Stephen Howden.
[internal reference; 2006111_160260:LEO 857]