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Results Found (197), Result Page (1 of 10)
Search Aspect (THE CALLS )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Advertising hoarding, R. Barr Ltd., by signwriter Harry M. Kingston (City Centre) (1 comment)
Black & White imageUndated. View of an advertising hoarding promoting R. Barr (Leeds) Ltd., coach operators, of Sayner Road, Hunslet, said to be 'renowned for their service to all parts of Gt. Britain.' The advert, located in the Wallace Arnold Tours bus station on The Calls, was painted by Harry M. Kingston, signwriter, of Kingston Sign Designs Ltd., 25 Upper North Street.
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[2]
Advertising hoarding, Wallace Arnold Tours, by signwriter Harry M. Kingston (City Centre)
Black & White imageUndated. An advertising hoarding promoting Wallace Arnold Tours, at their bus station on The Calls, the work of master signwriter Harry M. Kingston, whose business, Kingston Sign Designs, was based at 25 Upper North Street. Wallace Arnold Ltd., motor coach tourists, of 59 Corn Exchange, are here advertising '6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 days tours' with 'first class hotels' and 'comfortable coaches'.
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[3]
Advertising hoarding, Whiteheads, by signwriter Harry M. Kingston (City Centre)
Black & White imageUndated. View showing an advertising hoarding for Whiteheads Removals & Storage, located at the Wallace Arnold Tours bus station on The Calls. It is the work of signwriter Harry M. Kingston, whose business Kingston Sign Designs was based at 25 Upper North Street, off Woodhouse Lane.
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[4]
Aerial View, South (City Centre)
Black & White imageUndated, View showing the roof tops of Briggate with the calls in the distance. The tower in the centre belongs to Holy Trinity Church (1726). Originally the tower ended in a square wooden spire topped with a weather vane in the term of a golden fleece, however in 1841 this was replaced by the present tower designed by R.D. Chantrell of Leeds. Gas storage facilities can be seen in the distance over the roofs of the Trinity and Burton Arcade.
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[5]
Assembly Street, former north-east range of Third White Cloth Hall (City Centre)
Black & White imageUndated. View shows buildings which once formed part of the Third White Cloth Hall, now Grade II listed. Assembly Street is on the left of the image, with Crown Street leading off to the right and under the railway bridge to The Calls. The three-storey building in the centre, once the premises of Knowles Printers Ltd., is now (2020) an upmarket bar.
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[6]
Brewery Place, Brewery Wharf (City Centre)
Colour image2003. View of the south facing Brewery Place designed as a mixed use scheme incorporating leisure and business. The buildings sweep around in an arc converted from the former Tetley Museum and are constructed on two storeys. Office workers and residents of the nearby apartments are to be provided with cafes, bars and an external seating area at ground floor level. The development is constructed in glass and lightweight steel and at the other side there are spectacular views of the River Aire and The Calls. Photograph courtesy of The Rushbond Group PLC.
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[7]
Brewery Place, Brewery Wharf, interior view (City Centre)
Colour image2003. View of the interior of the new development, Brewery Place. This shows the curve of the steel and glass construction and the spectacular views it affords of the River Aire and The Calls. In the centre, towards the left, the white arc of Centenary Bridge is visible. Photograph courtesy of The Rushbond Group PLC.
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[8]
Brewery Place, Interior View (City Centre)
Colour image2003. Interior view of the Brewery Place development, a glass and lightweight steel structure. From here there are clear views of the River Aire and The Calls on the opposite bank. Photograph courtesy of The Rushbond Group PLC.
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[9]
Brewery Place, Interior View, Brewery Wharf (City Centre)
Colour image2003. View from a window in Brewery Place showing a fine, tranquil view of the River Aire, Centenary Bridge, and beyond, The Calls. A barge painted in red is visible on the far right. Photograph courtesy of The Rushbond Group.
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[10]
Brewery Place, number 1, view from (City Centre)
Colour imageJanuary 2003. View from the windows of number 1 Brewery Place, the recently converted Tetley's Brewery Wharf Museum, and now 'The Oracle', a venue with bars and restaurants. The view is of the River Aire across to the Calls on the opposite bank. A red barge is visible and the Centenary footbridge is on the left. Photograph courtesy of Rushbond PLC.
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[11]
Brewery Place, number 1, walkway (City Centre)
Colour imageJanuary 2005. The building seen left is the former Tetley's Brewery Wharf Museum, recently converted and now part of a multi-million pound scheme to regenerate the riverside between Crown Point and the Calls. This includes the 300 metre stretch of walkway, part of which is seen here, along the waterfront, The new route allows pedestrians and cyclists access, previously denied, from the City Centre (Bridge End) to Brewery Wharf, Clarence Dock and the Royal Armouries. They are now able to visit the cafes and bars along the route. This part of the walkway with its landscape and seating areas has been developed by Rushbond PLC in association with Barratts. The walkway was unveiled by the Chair of Leeds Initiative's Waterfront Panel, Eric Cowin, also chair of Eye on the Aire. He said it "provides a new opportunity to access and enjoy Leeds's city centre waterfront and its unique heritage." Photograph courtesy of Rushbond PLC.
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[12]
Brewery Place, numbers 6 and 7, and the Jury Doyle Inn (City Centre)
Colour imageJanuary 2005. View at night of Brewery Place, looking from the central piazza between buildings. On the left is the 929 square metre, 248 bed Jury Doyle Inn. The bar and restaurant is located on the ground floor. On the right is number 6-7 Brewery Place, a three storey office building which fronts on to Brewery Place. Brewery Place, with its central piazza, is a focus for not only offices, but cafes and bars. Other buildings in Brewery Place include the converted Tetley's Brewery Wharf Museum. Brewery Place is part of a multi-million pound scheme to regenerate the riverside between Crown Point and the Calls. Photograph courtesy of the Rushbond Group PLC.
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[13]
Brewery Place, Numbers 6/7 view from (City Centre)
Colour imageJanuary 2005. View from the windows of number 6/7 Brewery Place, one of four buildings under construction offering high quality office space. The view looks across to the recently converted Tetley Brewery Wharf Museum which is now a venue called The Oracle with resturants and bars. To the left, the Centenary footbridge crosses the River Aire to the Calls (background). Brewery Place and Brewery Wharf are part of a multi million pound development scheme. Photograph courtesy of The Rushbond Group PLC.
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[14]
Brewery Wharf, looking west (City Centre)
Colour image2003. View of Brewery Wharf looking west. Image shows the rear of the former Tetley's Brewery Wharf Museum now converted as Brewery Place. The Calls are reflected in the River Aire, right, and Centenary Bridge is visible in the middle distance. Photograph courtesy of The Rushbond Group.
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[15]
Brewery Wharf, number 1, view from the windows (City Centre)
Colour imageJanuary 2005. View from the windows of number 1, Brewery Wharf, the former Tetley's Brewery Wharf Museum. It has recently been converted to The Oracle, a bar and restaurant complex. From here there are excellent views of the River Aire including Centenary footbridge. Beyond are the Calls on the opposite bank of the river, background. Photograph courtesy of Rushbond.
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[16]
Brewery Wharf, Number 2 (City Centre)
Colour imageJanuary 2005. View taken at night showing a block of new riverside offices addressed as 2 Brewery Wharf. The development is located south of the City Centre on the banks of the River Aire, opposite the Calls. The office block with steel and glass facade is one of four to be built offering varied amounts of office space, in this case 2,437 square metres distributed over four floors. There is car parking in the basement for 26 cars. Photographs courtesy of the The Rushbond Group PLC.
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[17]
Brewery Wharf, View of River Aire and Centenary Bridge. (City Centre)
Colour image2003. View from Brewery Wharf showing The Calls reflected in the dark waters of the River Aire. Centenary Bridge spans the river at this point. Photograph courtesy of The Rushbond Group PLC.
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[18]
Briggate, numbers 25 to 30 (City Centre) (3 comments)
Black & White imagec1860s. View of very old properties in Briggate, dating from the 16th century. This part of Briggate is sometimes referred to as Lower Briggate. On the left, number 25 has the business of hosier, John Barraclough on the ground floor and B.W. Sharp, printers occupies the upper floors, addressed as number 26. Also at number 26, but at street level, is William Bolland, bookseller. In the late 1860s the newly established (1865) Leeds clockmakers & jewellers firm of John Dyson & son moved from The Calls to number 24 Briggate. They eventually expanded to numbers 25 and 26 and their premises became very well known as the Time Ball Buildings because of the famous clock which became a well-loved meeting place. The Dyson's clock would eventually be in situ between the two first floor bay windows on the left as the the buildings were soon to be given a new frontage. The old single storey building houses a boot and shoe depot belonging to shoemaker, James Lowley at 27. Also in this building is The Golden Fleece (28) run by wine & spirit merchant, Anthony Pickard. Miss Julia Pickard runs the tobacconist at number 29 and Daniel Pickard & Co., the linen drapers at number 30. These very old buildings had timber frames and were probably demolished not long after this photograph was taken when Boar Lane was widened in 1867. The spire of Trinity Church, at the junction of Boar Lane and Trinity Street, can be seen in the centre background. Photograph by Wormald of Leeds.
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[19]
Call Lane (City Centre)
Black & White image19th October 1932. Call Lane showing junction of The Calls and Call Lane with railway bridge going towards Duncan Street.
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[20]
Call Lane looking towards Quarry Hill. (City Centre)
Colour image6th October 1999. View of Call Lane looking towards Quarry Hill showing The Elbow Room at number 64 Call Lane on the left, a Pool Lounge and Bar. The traffic is coming from the direction of the Calls, which follows the line of the River Aire. In the background is the landmark building of the Department for Work & Pensions, Quarry House in Quarry Hill.
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