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Results Found (3840), Result Page (1 of 768)
Search Aspect (BRIDGE )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Clayton Woods, footbridge over the railway line (Horsforth)
Colour image2010. View of Clayton Woods showing the footbridge which crosses the railway line near the former Clayton Wood Cottage, now a boarding kennels, located just off Low Lane.
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[2]
Rockland; home of Francis Martineau Lupton and daughter Olive Middleton (Potternewton)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows Rockland, built during the 1870s in St. Mary's Road on the Newton Park Estate, which included both Potternewton Hall and Newton Hall. The estate had been owned by the Lupton family since the early 19th century. Rockland, an Arts and Crafts stone built house, was the residence of Francis Martineau Lupton Esq. Francis Martineau had been born on the Newton Park Estate at Potternewton Hall on 21st July 1848 and spent his boyhood there. The Luptons were an old Leeds Family with a strong sense of citizenship. A local politician, Francis' career included the chair of an improvement committee on the City Council, responsible for clearing the insanitary areas of York Street and Quarry Hill. He was an Alderman of Leeds between 1895 and 1916. Francis Martineau married Harriet Albina Davis (1850-1892) and they had two daughters and three sons. Their sons, Francis Ashford Lupton (1886-1917), Captain Maurice Lupton (1887-1915) and Lieutenant Lionel Martineau Lupton (1892-1916) were all killed in the First World War. In 1917 Francis Martineau Lupton gave up Rockland, letting it for the nominal annual rent of £1 for use as a home for the children of soldiers and sailors in memory of his sons. Later, he moved to Fieldhead, Park Avenue, Roundhay; he is listed in the Leeds Directories as residing at this address between 1917 and 1920. Also listed at Fieldhead in the 1920 Directory is solicitor Richard Noel Middleton. In 1914, Noel had married Olive Christiana Lupton (1881-1936) who had been born on the family's Newton Hall/Park Estate (Newton Grove). Within months, Francis Martineau had taken up residence at Rockland, the manor house built for his family and where Olive and her siblings would grow up. She later boarded at Roedean until 1900. Olive was one of two daughters of Francis Martineau; the other was Anne. Both daughters had inherited the family wool manufacturing business, William Lupton and Sons Ltd., upon their father's death. Olive's husband, Noel (d.1951), would become a managing director of the business which was sold to Hainsworth in 1958. Olive and Noel Middleton were the great grandparents of the present Duchess of Cambridge who, prior to her marriage to H.R.H. Prince William (1st Duke of Cambridge) was known as Catherine Elizabeth Middleton. Francis Martineau Lupton is known to have died from kidney failure at Low Gables, Allerton Park, on 5th February 1921. The house at Allerton Park called Low Gables was later occupied by James Harry Braime of the Hunslet engineering firm (1922 Directory). Rockland survives and is now surrounded by heavy-density housing.
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[3]
Wetherby Bridge and Weir (Wetherby)
Colour image17th March 2005. Image looks over the weir crossing the River Wharfe towards Wetherby Bridge. On the left is the water wheel belonging to the Old Mill, now repositioned as a feature. It was erected here by Persimmon Homes in 1993 as part of their conversion of the Old Mill to luxury apartments.
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[4]
A young boy models a sailor suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. A little boy dressed in a Sailor Suit poses for the camera for the firm of clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. The trade in ready-to-wear tailoring for boys was an important part of the business at this time. The Sailor Suit was popular but there was also a demand for fancy dress and these were exported to Canada, Austrailia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. The boy in this image is is Herbert, whose father was a Machine Smith employed by Barran's, name of Arthur Giles. The Giles family are listed on the 1891 Census as living at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet. John Barran began his career in Leeds at the age of 22 with a small shop at number 30 Bridge End South. By 1851 he had moved to number 1 Briggate but his recognition of the potential of the new American invention of the sewing machine led him to opening a factory in Alfred Street. The business really took off when he worked with the firm of Greenwood and Batley to produce the band knife for bulk pattern cutting. The rapid expansion of the ready-to-wear business for Barran's in Leeds meant several moves. By the time the new warehouse in Chorley Lane opened in 1904, which adjoined the factory of 1888 in Hanover Lane, 3,000 people were in the employment of John Barran & Sons.
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[5]
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, group portrait of the rescue team (Killingbeck)
Black & White image1940. Group portrait showing some of the members of the rescue team at the A.R.P. Rescue Centre in Selby Road. In charge of the unit is William Noel Slee who can be seen standing at the extreme left of the back row, wearing a white shirt and dark tie. Any other identifications are welcomed. The men were trained and equipped to respond to the aftermath of bombing raids during World War 2 and to rescue and evacuate casualties. Their work covered Leeds and surrounding areas but the unit was also called out to York and was in demand following the heavy bombing raids suffered by the population of Hull. The centre occupied a range of single storey buildings at the junction of Selby Road and the A.64. Although the buildings are now demolished the foundations remain. The road is now called Killingbeck Bridge.
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