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Results Found (3340), Result Page (1 of 668)
Search Aspect ( bridge )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Wetherby Bridge and Weir (Wetherby)
Colour image17th March 2005. Image looks over the weir crossing the River Wharfe towards Wetherby Bridge. On the left is the water wheel belonging to the Old Mill, now repositioned as a feature. It was erected here by Persimmon Homes in 1993 as part of their conversion of the Old Mill to luxury apartments.
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[2]
A young boy models a sailor suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. A little boy dressed in a Sailor Suit poses for the camera for the firm of clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. The trade in ready-to-wear tailoring for boys was an important part of the business at this time. The Sailor Suit was popular but there was also a demand for fancy dress and these were exported to Canada, Austrailia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. The boy in this image is is Herbert, whose father was a Machine Smith employed by Barran's, name of Arthur Giles. The Giles family are listed on the 1891 Census as living at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet. John Barran began his career in Leeds at the age of 22 with a small shop at number 30 Bridge End South. By 1851 he had moved to number 1 Briggate but his recognition of the potential of the new American invention of the sewing machine led him to opening a factory in Alfred Street. The business really took off when he worked with the firm of Greenwood and Batley to produce the band knife for bulk pattern cutting. The rapid expansion of the ready-to-wear business for Barran's in Leeds meant several moves. By the time the new warehouse in Chorley Lane opened in 1904, which adjoined the factory of 1888 in Hanover Lane, 3,000 people were in the employment of John Barran & Sons.
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[3]
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, group portrait of the rescue team (Killingbeck)
Black & White image1940. Group portrait showing some of the members of the rescue team at the A.R.P. Rescue Centre in Selby Road. In charge of the unit is William Noel Slee who can be seen standing at the extreme left of the back row, wearing a white shirt and dark tie. Any other identifications are welcomed. The men were trained and equipped to respond to the aftermath of bombing raids during World War 2 and to rescue and evacuate casualties. Their work covered Leeds and surrounding areas but the unit was also called out to York and was in demand following the heavy bombing raids suffered by the population of Hull. The centre occupied a range of single storey buildings at the junction of Selby Road and the A.64. Although the buildings are now demolished the foundations remain. The road is now called Killingbeck Bridge.
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[4]
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, Selby Road, training exercise (Killingbeck)
Black & White image1940. Image shows a training exercise taking place at the A.R.P. (Air Raid Precaution) Rescue Centre in Selby Road. The unit was formed to act in the rescue of people in bombed areas of Leeds and surrounding districts during World War 2. It was also called out to York and, in particular Hull where there was heavy bombing. The men are demonstrating some of the rescue equipment with the aid of a dummy. In charge of the unit, and wearing a white tin hat with his hands on hips, is William Noel Slee who lived in The Fearnvilles, Leeds 8. The year after this photograph was taken, in 1941, he left the rescue unit upon being called up to serve in the R.A.F. The single storey buildings occupied by the Rescue Centre were demolished but the foundations remain. They were situated at the junction of Selby Road with the A.64. The road is now called Killingbeck Bridge.
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[5]
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, training exercise (Killingbeck)
Black & White image1940. Image shows a training exercise taking place at the A.R.P. (Air Raid Precaution) Rescue Centre in Selby Road. The demonstration is being observed by a group of invited dignitaries. The tall man wearing a dark overcoat and hat is Anthony Eden, who was Secretary of State for War in Churchill's government through much of 1940. Seen directly behind the man in the rescue harness is William Noel Slee who was in charge of the unit. He lived in the Fearnvilles, Leeds 8. On the right the man, wearing glasses and a light coloured jacket, is Maurice Tomlinson, the proprietor of J. Tomlinson & Son, builders of Bath Road, Leeds 11, and also the manager of the A.R.P. Rescue Centre. He lived on the road to Temple Newsom in Whitkirk. The single storey buildings of the Centre were demolished but the foundations still remain. The road is now known as Killingbeck Bridge.
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