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Results Found (63), Result Page (1 of 13)
Search Aspect ( exercise )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, Selby Road, training exercise (Killingbeck)
Black & White image1940. Image shows a training exercise taking place at the A.R.P. (Air Raid Precaution) Rescue Centre in Selby Road. The unit was formed to act in the rescue of people in bombed areas of Leeds and surrounding districts during World War 2. It was also called out to York and, in particular Hull where there was heavy bombing. The men are demonstrating some of the rescue equipment with the aid of a dummy. In charge of the unit, and wearing a white tin hat with his hands on hips, is William Noel Slee who lived in The Fearnvilles, Leeds 8. The year after this photograph was taken, in 1941, he left the rescue unit upon being called up to serve in the R.A.F. The single storey buildings occupied by the Rescue Centre were demolished but the foundations remain. They were situated at the junction of Selby Road with the A.64. The road is now called Killingbeck Bridge.
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[2]
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, training exercise (Killingbeck)
Black & White image1940. Image shows a training exercise taking place at the A.R.P. (Air Raid Precaution) Rescue Centre in Selby Road. The demonstration is being observed by a group of invited dignitaries. The tall man, wearing a dark overcoat and hat, is believed to be Anthony Eden,who was Secretary of State for War in Churchill's government through much of 1940. There is some doubt about this identification so we would appreciate any further information. Seen directly behind the man in the rescue harness is William Noel Slee who was in charge of the unit. He lived in the Fearnvilles, Leeds 8. On the right the man, wearing glasses and a light coloured jacket, is Maurice Tomlinson, the proprietor of J. Tomlinson & Son, builders of Bath Road, Leeds 11, and also the manager of the A.R.P. Rescue Centre. He lived on the road to Temple Newsom in Whitkirk. The single storey buildings of the Centre were demolished but the foundations still remain. The road is now known as Killingbeck Bridge.
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[3]
Aerial view of Armley Gaol (Armley) (18 comments)
Black & White image1937 Aerial view of Armley Gaol, built as Leeds Borough Gaol and completed in July 1847 at a cost of £43,000. The buildings were designed by architects Perkin and Backhouse. The road from top to bottom across the centre is Hall Lane and New Wortley Cemetery is at the left edge from the middle to the top. The prison is surrounded by a high wall and wihin the boundaries there is an exercise yard. Inmates can be seen walking the circular paths. The rows of terraced houses, bottom left, are Hawthorn Place and Hawthorn Terrace. Behind the prison Winchester Road runs from the junction with Hall Lane.
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[4]
Ark Royal Parade, Colour Guard, White Ensign (City Centre)
Colour image21st November 2003 View shows crew members from the Ark Royal preparing to exercise their right to parade through the City of Leeds. Senior and junior ratings officers are visible to the left with the Ark Royal Guard to the right. At the head of the Guard are the three members of the Colour Guard. The central Colour Guard carries the White Ensign which is the ceremonial flag of the Royal Navy.
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[5]
Ark Royal Parade, Commissioned Officers (City Centre)
Colour image21st November 2003 View shows Commissioned Officers from the Ark Royal in full ceremonial dress decorated with medals. Officers are lined up outside the Civic Hall. This ceremony was held as the crew of the Ark Royal exercised their right to parade through the City of Leeds.
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