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Results Found (1355), Result Page (1 of 271)
Search Aspect (FACTORY )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Prices Tailors Ltd., celebrity visit of film star, Patricia Medina (Burley) (9 comments)
Black & White imageEarly 1960s. Image shows some of the female workforce of John Collier's (remembered by many as Prices Tailors Ltd. although it was sold in 1954) as they cluster around celebrity and glamorous film star, Patricia Medina, who has dressed for her visit in a silk headscarf and fur coat. Standing to the left of her is Emily Bean, wearing a patterned knitted waistcoat. The actress expressed a liking for Emily's waistcoat and chose to be seated at her sewing machine station while signing autographs. Another smiling member of staff in the foreground, wearing a floral pinafore, awaits her turn and is holding a photograph of Miss Medina. Patricia Medina (1919-2012) starred in films from the late 1930s until the late 1970s with the majority of her roles being in the 1950s. These included the 'Siren of Bagdad' (1953) and the 'Beast of Hollow Mounain' (1956). She had a part in "The Killing of Sister George' in 1968. She was married twice, to actor, Richard Greene (of Robin Hood fame) from 1941 to 1951, and to actor, Joseph Cotten in 1960. Prices Tailors Ltd./John Collier's was a well-known local landmark (the factory was established here in 1923). It was located off Kirkstall Road in Cardigan Crescent / Lennox Road. The site is now that of Cardigan Fields Leisure and Entertainment Complex.
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[2]
A young boy models a Hussar overcoat for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. In this image a young boy models a Hussar overcoat made by the clothing manufacturing firm John Barran & Sons. At the time of the photograph, the firm was located in a building designed by Thomas Ambler and completed in 1877, in St.Paul's Street with views onto the Georgian Park Square. There was also an additional factory built in 1888 in Hanover Lane as the company expanded over the years. Clothing manufactured for boys was a major part of Barran's business and orders for these ready-to-wear, miniature suits and coats arrived from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. Some of the clothes were designed as fancy dress, for example, pirate's costumes, guardsman's and beefeater's uniforms. The young 'model' is Herbert Giles (b.1885) who was the son of Arthur Giles, a sewing machine fitter (machine smith) at John Barran's. on the 1891 Census Herbert was listed with his family at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet.
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[3]
A young boy models a sailor suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. A little boy dressed in a Sailor Suit poses for the camera for the firm of clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. The trade in ready-to-wear tailoring for boys was an important part of the business at this time. The Sailor Suit was popular but there was also a demand for fancy dress and these were exported to Canada, Austrailia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. The boy in this image is is Herbert, whose father was a Machine Smith employed by Barran's, name of Arthur Giles. The Giles family are listed on the 1891 Census as living at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet. John Barran began his career in Leeds at the age of 22 with a small shop at number 30 Bridge End South. By 1851 he had moved to number 1 Briggate but his recognition of the potential of the new American invention of the sewing machine led him to opening a factory in Alfred Street. The business really took off when he worked with the firm of Greenwood and Batley to produce the band knife for bulk pattern cutting. The rapid expansion of the ready-to-wear business for Barran's in Leeds meant several moves. By the time the new warehouse in Chorley Lane opened in 1904, which adjoined the factory of 1888 in Hanover Lane, 3,000 people were in the employment of John Barran & Sons.
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[4]
A young boy models a suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. Image shows a young boy modelling a light-coloured suit with metal buttons and a waistcoat beneath, made by the clothing manufacturing firm of John Barran & Sons. The young boy is Walter Giles, born in 1880 at number 4 Waverley Street in Holbeck. He is the son of an employee of Barran's, a Machine Smith by the name of Arthur Giles. There was, at this time, a successful export trade in young boys' tailored clothing and a demand for miniature soldier's and sailor's uniforms and fancy dress. By 1891 John Barran's had a warehouse in an innovative building in St. Paul's Street, designed by Thomas Ambler and completed in 1877, now known as St. Paul's House. The firm also had a recently opened factory in Hanover Lane (1888). Later, in 1904, a further warehouse was built in Chorley Lane adjoining the Hanover Lane premises. By this time Barran's was employing 3,000 people, many of them women and young girls. The rapid growth of ready -to-wear tailoring business was due to the advancement in technology of such proccesses as pattern-cutting and sewing by machine, including blind stitching, button holing and buttoning.
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[5]
Abbey Street, nos. 3 - 11 (Burley) (12 comments)
Black & White imageUndated, This view is looking along Abbey Street from Kirkstall Road to Cavendish Street in the late 1950s. On the left is number 3, moving right numbers follow in sequence to 11 at the end of the row. Next, wall of Ind Coope and Allsop's beer bottling plant. The taller building with the chimney is the Aireton House clothing factory run by Frank R. Roberts and Co Ltd.
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