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Results Found (725), Result Page (1 of 37)
Search Aspect (LISTED BUILDING )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Aberford Almshouses (Aberford)
Black & White imagec1941-1943. View through the gates of Aberford Almshouses, listed buildings on the west side of Main Street. The central entrance tower can be seen and either side are the two storey almshouses, built for retired tenants of the Gascoigne Estate, between 1843 and 1845. At any one time the 8 units supplied accommodation for 4 men and 4 women. The almshouses were designed by George Fowler Jones on behalf of sisters, Elizabeth and Mary Isabella Gascoigne to commemorate their father, Richard Oliver Gascoigne who died in 1843 and two brothers, Thomas and Richard Silver who both died in 1842. Photograph by Leslie Chapman.
[internal reference; 2010615_170860:P15/64 Lotherton Hall]
[2]
Aberford Almshouses, the Great North Road. (Aberford) (2 comments)
Black & White image30th May 1975. View of Aberford Almshouses located on the west side of the Great North Road. They were built between 1843 and 1845 as 2 storey dwellings for retired estate workers four men and four women, on the Gascoigne Estate. The last Estate workers to inhabit the almshouses vacated them in 1976. Nowadays, the listed buildings have now been converted to business use and are known as the 'Priory Park' development.
[internal reference; 200961_169101:P16/21 Lotherton Hall ]
[3]
Aberford Almshouses. (Aberford)
Black & White imagec1975. View of Aberford Almshouses, located on the west side of the Great North Road, south of the village. They were built between 1843 and 1845 to the designs by Scottish born architect, George Fowler Jones (1817/18 - 1905) who practised in York. He designed them on behalf of Elizabeth and Mary Isabella Gascoigne as a memorial to their father, Richard Oliver Gascoigne and two brothers, Thomas and Richard Silver who had recently died. The central towers separates the eight, two storey dwellings, reserved four men and four women, retired workers of Gascoigne Estate. At the south end of the buildings, left, there is a small chapel and at the north end, right, a refectory. The last residents vacated the almshouses in 1976 and the listed buildings are now converted for business use and named Priory Park.
[internal reference; 200961_169100:P16/20 Lotherton Hall ]
[4]
Adel Church (Adel)
Black & White image1967. Image shows stone coffins and grindstone in long grass. The grind stone is from Adel Mill Farm used for grinding corn. A stone wall is visible behind. Adel church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
[internal reference; 9346:browsing neg no 559]
[5]
Adel Church (Adel)
Black & White image1967. Image shows stonework detail and 2 long, narrow leaded glass windows. The church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
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[6]
Adel Church (Adel)
Black & White image1967. The photograph shows the graveyard with an ornate stone cross in the foreground. A large white memorial is behind it with a statue visible in the centre of it. Several other gravestones are also visible. The church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
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[7]
Adel Church (Adel)
Black & White imageJune 1967. View of church showing gravestones and a lamp post. The church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
[internal reference; 9368:browsing neg no 569]
[8]
Adel Church (Adel)
Black & White imageJune 1967. Exterior front view of Adel Church showing path leading up to the porch with gravestones either side. The church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
[internal reference; 9373:browsing neg no 572]
[9]
Adel Church (interior), postcard (Adel)
Black & White imageUndated. Postcard showing the interior of Adel St. John the Baptist Church on Church Lane. This listed building dates back to around 1150-1160.
[internal reference; 201155_172147:Artemis Pack 39 (Adel) no.11]
[10]
Adel Church, Back Door (Adel)
Black & White imageJune 1967. Close up of the back door at Adel Church showing ornate knocker. The church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
[internal reference; 9375:browsing neg no 574]
[11]
Adel Church, exterior view (Adel)
Black & White imagec1900-1904. Exterior view of Adel St. John the Baptist Church on Church Lane, a Grade I listed building built between 1150 and 1160.
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[12]
Adel Church, Norman Porch (Adel)
Black & White imageUndated. Close-up view of the Norman porch at the south side of Adel Church. The church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, was built around 1150-1160 and the porch is believed to date from 1160-1170. The wooden door is a replica of the original and dates back to 1879. The church is a Grade I listed building.
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[13]
Adel Church, Old Font (Adel)
Black & White imageJune 1967. Photograph of old stone font at Adel Church. The church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
[internal reference; 9369:browsing neg no 570]
[14]
Adel Church, Porch Postcard (Adel)
Black & White imageUndated, Norman carved porch, entrance to St John the Baptist Church, Adel. Built between 1150-1160, this is a grade 1 listed building.
[internal reference; 20021017_59188479:Kirk Collection-Leeds Churches Vol 3 75 (LQ 283 K634)]
[15]
Adel Church, postcard (Adel)
Black & White imageUndated. Postcard view of Adel Church, St. John the Baptist, on Church Lane. Dating from the twelfth century, it is one of the finest and most complete Norman buildings remaining in the country and is Grade I listed.
[internal reference; 201155_172141:Artemis Pack 39 (Adel) no.1]
[16]
Adel Church, postcard (Adel)
Colour imageUndated. Colour-tinted postcard of Adel Church with part of the graveyard seen in front. This Grade I listed building dates back to around 1150-1160. It is dedicated to St. John the Baptist.
[internal reference; 201155_172142:Artemis Pack 39 (Adel) no.3]
[17]
Adel Church, postcard (Adel)
Black & White imageUndated. Postcard showing a view of Adel Church, a Grade I listed building that dates back to around 1150-1160 in Norman times.
[internal reference; 201155_172143:Artemis Pack 39 (Adel) no.4]
[18]
Adel Church, postcard (Adel)
Black & White imageUndated. Postcard view of Adel St. John the Baptist Church on Church Lane. Built between 1150 and 1160, with the south porch added around 1160-1170, it is one of the finest examples of Norman architecture in England and is Grade I listed.
[internal reference; 201155_172145:Artemis Pack 39 (Adel) no.7]
[19]
Adel Church, postcard (Adel)
Black & White imageUndated. Postcard showing an interior view of Adel Church, the Norman church dating back to around 1150-1160. This listed building is dedicated to St. John the Baptist.
[internal reference; 201155_172146:Artemis Pack 39 (Adel) no.10]
[20]
Adel Church, showing graveyard (Adel)
Black & White imageUndated. Old photograph of Adel Parish Church showing the graveyard in front. The Norman church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, is a Grade I listed building dating back to around 1150-1170. It is constructed in coursed squared gritstone. The south porch, seen centrally, is elaborately carved with beak-head and chevron designs. The corbel frieze, seen running along below the roof-line, is decorated with carvings of human faces and the heads of beasts. Alterations to the church were carried out in the 14th and 16th centuries. The architect, Robert Dennis Chantrell, who supervised the rebuild of Leeds Parish Church, designed the west gable and bellcote of Adel Church which was built between 1838 and 1839. He also restored the stone slate roof in 1843. Further renovations took place in 1879. Adel Parish Church is located off the east side of Church Lane. Photograph by Wormald of Leeds.
[internal reference; 2011103_172742:Wormald, Old Leeds Views, part 2, page 46, SRF 914.2819 WOR]