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Results Found (701), Result Page (1 of 141)
Search Aspect ( listed building )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Aberford Almshouses (Aberford)
Black & White imagec1941-1943. View through the gates of Aberford Almshouses, listed buildings on the west side of Main Street. The central entrance tower can be seen and either side are the two storey almshouses, built for retired tenants of the Gascoigne Estate, between 1843 and 1845. At any one time the 8 units supplied accommodation for 4 men and 4 women. The almshouses were designed by George Fowler Jones on behalf of sisters, Elizabeth and Mary Isabella Gascoigne to commemorate their father, Richard Oliver Gascoigne who died in 1843 and two brothers, Thomas and Richard Silver who both died in 1842. Photograph by Leslie Chapman.
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[2]
Aberford Almshouses, the Great North Road. (Aberford) (2 comments)
Black & White image30th May 1975. View of Aberford Almshouses located on the west side of the Great North Road. They were built between 1843 and 1845 as 2 storey dwellings for retired estate workers four men and four women, on the Gascoigne Estate. The last Estate workers to inhabit the almshouses vacated them in 1976. Nowadays, the listed buildings have now been converted to business use and are known as the 'Priory Park' development.
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[3]
Aberford Almshouses. (Aberford)
Black & White imagec1975. View of Aberford Almshouses, located on the west side of the Great North Road, south of the village. They were built between 1843 and 1845 to the designs by Scottish born architect, George Fowler Jones (1817/18 - 1905) who practised in York. He designed them on behalf of Elizabeth and Mary Isabella Gascoigne as a memorial to their father, Richard Oliver Gascoigne and two brothers, Thomas and Richard Silver who had recently died. The central towers separates the eight, two storey dwellings, reserved four men and four women, retired workers of Gascoigne Estate. At the south end of the buildings, left, there is a small chapel and at the north end, right, a refectory. The last residents vacated the almshouses in 1976 and the listed buildings are now converted for business use and named Priory Park.
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[4]
Adel Church (Adel)
Black & White image1967. Image shows stone coffins and grindstone in long grass. The grind stone is from Adel Mill Farm used for grinding corn. A stone wall is visible behind. Adel church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
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[5]
Adel Church (Adel)
Black & White image1967. Image shows stonework detail and 2 long, narrow leaded glass windows. The church was built between 1150 and 1160. The south porch was added 1160-1170 and remains one of the finest examples of Norman sculpture in England. The church is a Grade 1 listed building.
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