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Results Found (6951), Result Page (1 of 348)
Search Aspect (SHOP )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
1880s poster, Emanuel Mortimer's grocery store, Lowtown (Pudsey)
Black & White imagec1880s. Image shows the detail on an advertising poster for Emanuel Mortimer's grocery store located in Lowtown at the corner of Crimbles Road, (now Kent Road). Loose tea was on sale, varying in price from 1s 2d and 2 shillings per pound, depending on quality. The tea blends have interesting names like 'Rich Marvellous Tea', 'Malty Morning', Tea of Emotional Strength' and 'Pure Economical Soo-Moo'. The poster states that 'E. Mortimer is amongst the largest buyers of the 19th century, and sells at Wholesale Merchants Prices, thus saving his customers 20 to 30 per cent compared with ordinary dealers.' Sugar is also advertised in differing varieties. At this time Emanuel Mortimer had another shop in Lowtown, at the corner with Hammerton Fold and run by his nephew, James Booth. The two shops were known as the 'top' and 'bottom' shop. This poster refers to the bottom shop and it had a different customer base to the top shop. It catered more for the working class in the locality whereas the top shop supplied to the middle classes, tradesmen and shopkeepers. Image and information courtesy of John Garnett.
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[2]
1880s poster, Emanuel Mortimer's grocery store, Lowtown (Pudsey)
Black & White imagec1880s. Black and white poster advertising some of the many groceries on sale at Emanuel Mortimer's shop in the 1880s. These include dried fruits and tinned fruit in syrup. There are tinned meats, including 2lb tins of finest boiled rabbit for 1s and 1d, and fish, like lobster at 7½d for a 1lb tin. Fresh butter is supplied twice a week and comes from Denmark and Ireland. There are several brands of soap, varying in price and quality. Pears soap, a glycerine based soap, first produced by Andrew Pears in 1789, can still be purchased today although the formula has changed over the years. Emanuel Mortimer had two grocer's shops, both located in Lowtown and referred to as the 'top' and 'bottom' shop. The one advertised in this poster is the bottom shop, situated at the corner with Crimbles Road (nowadays Kent Road). It catered more for the working classes while the top shop, at the junction with Hammerton Fold, later to be known as Booth's Yard, attracted customers from the middle classes. Image and information courtesy of John Garnett.
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[3]
A Brook, Butcher (Burley) (2 comments)
Black & White imageThe picture shows the butcher Albert Brook at 295 Kirkstall Road between a shoe shop to the left and a confectionery store to the right, and located on the edge of the Cardigan Estate. The photo shows several people standing to the right of the butchers and a vehicle belonging to the butcher.
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[4]
A Remnant of Old Briggate, postcard (City Centre) (8 comments)
Black & White imageUndated. This postcard, entitled 'A Remnant of Old Briggate', shows no. 56, one of the oldest buildings on Briggate. It was built in 1613 by Richard Sykes, who became an Alderman of Leeds in 1629, having been a key figure in the campaign for the granting of Leeds' Charter of Incorporation in 1626. The building is occupied here by F. Wallis, hosier and glover; the words 'Ye Olde Stone Shoppe' are seen above the name, and a panel above this says 'RS1613'. It was taken over by Timpsons's Shoes in 1919 and demolished by them in 1955 to make way for a new shop. The entrance to the Pack Horse Inn Yard is incoporated into the building on the left.
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[5]
A young boy models a sailor suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. A little boy dressed in a Sailor Suit poses for the camera for the firm of clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. The trade in ready-to-wear tailoring for boys was an important part of the business at this time. The Sailor Suit was popular but there was also a demand for fancy dress and these were exported to Canada, Austrailia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. The boy in this image is is Herbert, whose father was a Machine Smith employed by Barran's, name of Arthur Giles. The Giles family are listed on the 1891 Census as living at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet. John Barran began his career in Leeds at the age of 22 with a small shop at number 30 Bridge End South. By 1851 he had moved to number 1 Briggate but his recognition of the potential of the new American invention of the sewing machine led him to opening a factory in Alfred Street. The business really took off when he worked with the firm of Greenwood and Batley to produce the band knife for bulk pattern cutting. The rapid expansion of the ready-to-wear business for Barran's in Leeds meant several moves. By the time the new warehouse in Chorley Lane opened in 1904, which adjoined the factory of 1888 in Hanover Lane, 3,000 people were in the employment of John Barran & Sons.
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[6]
A. Booth & Sons, Briggate (City Centre)
Black & White imageCirca 1900s. Letterhead, A. Booth & Sons, tailors and costumiers, 143 Briggate, Leeds, with illustration of shop.
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[7]
Abbey Gatehouse, north of Kirkstall Abbey, lithograph (Kirkstall) (2 comments)
Black & White imageAugust 1820 Image shows a lithograph from 1820 depicting the gatehouse to the north of Kirkstall Abbey. This was before the new turnpike road was built in 1827. The gatehouse was first converted to a residence by John Ripley, the last abbot, who lived there until his death in 1568. For the next three hundred years it existed as a farmhouse and this is how we see it in this lithograph. Later, it became a gentlemans residence and was occupied by the Butler family. Eventually, Colonel Thomas Walter Harding of the Tower Works, Holbeck owned the gatehouse until he sold it to Leeds City Council in 1925. It is now part of Abbey House Museum and has only recently undergone a £2.3 million restoration, including additions to the Victorian Streets and shops.
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[8]
Abbey House Museum, Abbey Fold (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows Abbey Fold. The cobble stone paving with open drainage, visible on far right was taken from the Hunslet area and rebuilt as originally found to show Leeds during the Industrial Revolution. Visible on the left is the entrance to J. Gathercole, Wheelwright and Joiner. This c.1900 workshop is typical of those found in semi-rural communities in the West Riding where wheelwrights and joiners were a joint profession. Seen through the door are tools used for a variety of jobs including furniture repair, heavy timber work and all aspects wheel and farm wagon repair. On the left of Gathercole's, just visible is Christopher Scott, Sadler and Harness maker. On the far right of the image is Beecroft & Butler, Blacksmiths. Beecroft & Butler took over Kirkstall Forge in 1779 and from 1779 Abbey House was leased to George Beecroft and held by the Beecroft and Butler families until the 1880s when it was sub-leased to other tenants and in 1888 sold to Colonel North.
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[9]
Abbey House Museum, Abbey Fold (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows Abbey Fold. The cobble stone paving with open drainage in the middle was taken from the Hunslet area and rebuilt as originally found to show Leeds during the Industrial Revolution. At the end of the street is a water pump originally supplying 16 houses from the same area. On the right in the distance is the waevers cottage belonging to Emanuel Gott. In the foreground is the entrance to Bill Atkin's Tanner & Currier shop where a Victorian bicycle leans against the exterior wall.
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[10]
Abbey House Museum, Dearlove Family (Kirkstall) (5 comments)
Black & White image1958 This image shows members of the Dearlove family outside a reconstruction of a 19th century violin makers in Harewood Square, Abbey House Museum. The shop has been named for Mark Dearlove who originally ran an 18th Century violin makers on Boar Lane. Many of the instruments on display were made by him and donated by the Dearlove family. Mark was renowned for his craftsmanship, musical knowledge and acute sense of sound, all skills vital in the creation of violins. The majority of his descendants have continued this tradition by becoming involved with music or the stage and have been known to reunite at the museum for music recitals like the one pictured here in 1958. Back row (left to right) Jack, Kenneth, Derek, Thomas, Doris (Mrs Garside), Jacqueline (Mrs Williams). Back row (left to right) Arthur, George, Mark and Charles all brothers.
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[11]
Abbey House Museum, Dearlove Family (Kirkstall)
Black & White image1958 This image shows members of the Dearlove family inside a reconstruction of a 19th century violin maker's at the Abbey House Museum. The shop has been named for Mark Dearlove who originally ran an 18th century violin maker's on Briggate. Many of the instruments on display were made by him and donated by the Dearlove family. Mark was renowned for his craftsmanship, musical knowledge and acute sense of sound, all skills vital in the creation of violins. The majority of his descendants have continued this tradition by becoming involved with music or the stage and have been known to reunite at the museum for music recitals like the one pictured here in 1958.
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[12]
Abbey House Museum, Grocers Shop (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the Illingworth & Kilburn grocery, listed above the shop as Italian Warehousemen supplier of tea and coffee. On display in the shop are canisters for 1875 tea and treacle. The building is built of local grit stone with interiors typical of the 1880s. The shop is located is Stephen Harding Gate, a reconstructed Victorian street in Abbey House Museum named for St. Stephen Harding, Abbot of St. Citeaux, who along with St. Bernard founded the Cistercian Order to which Kirkstall Abbey belonged.
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[13]
Abbey House Museum, Harewood Square (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows the inside of the Apothecary's shop on Harewood Square, a reconstruction of a Victorian street in the Abbey House Museum. Behind the wooden counter on the left is an apothecary chest with a large mortar and pestle and weighing scales on top. On the rear panelled wall shelves hold large and small jars bearing labels including; Acid, Sulphur and Acid, Acet.Glac. Hanging from the ceiling of the store is a large stuffed sturgeon.
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[14]
Abbey House Museum, Harewood Square (Kirkstall) (1 comment)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows a reconstruction of a nineteenth century violin maker's located on Harewood Square, a replica of a Victorian street in the Abbey House Museum. The name above the shop reads Mark Dearlove. Dearlove originally ran an 18th century violin maker's on Briggate where he built and sold violins, cellos and other musical instruments. Many of the instruments on display were made by him and donated by the Dearlove family. Mark Dearlove was known for his craftsmanship, musical knownledge and acute sense of sound, all skills vital in the creation of violins. The majority of his descendants have continued this tradition by becoming involved with music or the stage, and some have been known to reunite at the museum for music recitals.
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[15]
Abbey House Museum, Harewood Square (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows a corner of Harewood Square, a Victorian street reconstruction in the Abbey House Museum. On the left is Edward Baines, printer stationer originally based on Albion Street in the early 19th century. On the right just visible is the shop of Ann Carter, haberdasher, originally at number 46 Briggate, many of the goods on display are in their original boxes. Also visible is a sign attached to the building on the far right advertising the Mason & Taylor apothecary. In the foreground can be seen a Victorian bicycle.
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[16]
Abbey House Museum, Harewood Square (Kirkstall) (2 comments)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows Harewood Square, a Victorian street reconstruction in the Abbey House Museum. This half timbered Tudor Building is a genuine 17th century surviver from Leeds. Shops housed in this building include an apothecary on the left and on the right a watchmaker's is located in the narrow alley.
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[17]
Abbey House Museum, Harewood Square (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows the John Dyson watchmaker and repairer, Harewood Square, one of the atmospheric shops and streets reconstructed in the Abbey House Museum. Through the window can be seen clocks, pocket watches and repairing equiptment.
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[18]
Abbey House Museum, Harewood Square (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows John Dyson, watchmaker and repairer, Harewood Square, one of the atmospheric shops and streets reconstructed in the Abbey House Museum. Through the window can be seen pocket watches and watchmaking equipment. The original John Dyson founded his watchmaking and jewellery business in 1865 by converting two cottages, numbers 26 and 27 Briggate, into one shop fronted by a newly constructed facade. The business eventually closed in February 1990 and the stock sold at Sotherby's the following May.
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[19]
Abbey House Museum, Hark to Rover Inn (Kirkstall)
Colour imagec late 1960s. View shows the inside of a Victorian public house as displayed at Abbey House Museum, part of a reconstruction of Victorian streets featuring realistic shops and other businesses, many of which can be walked in. The pub is named 'Hark to Rover' after an actual pub which was situated on Spen Lane near the junction with Abbey Road, beside the Hark to Rover cottages. It was later to be demolished and a new pub of the same name was built further along Spen Lane, which has also since closed.
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[20]
Abbey House Museum, Hartley & Green Shop (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows the Hartley & Green shop in the Victorian street reconstruction in Abbey House Museum. Hartley & Green originally ran a shop in Hunslet dating back to 1770. They sold Leeds Pottery from the Hunslet Works, here visible in the window. Creamware was a fire-glazed pottery noted for its intricate, pierced patterning and decorative detail. These goods were exported throughout Europe. The Hunslet Works closed in 1881 and despite being reopened by Leeds City Council in 1983 it again closed for good in 1986. The original Hartley & Green pattern books for the Leeds Pottery were donated to Leeds Libraries and are housed at the Central Library.
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