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Results Found (2915), Result Page (2 of 583)
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Location - Leeds & District

[6]
7th Lord Mayor's Annual Parade, Lewis's 'Fells Wargo Railway Co.' (City Centre) (2 comments)
Colour image21st June 1980. Image shows proud members of Lewis's 'Fells Wargo Railway Co.'(A humorous play on words with reference to 'Wells Fargo', of course). They pose in their colourful costumes in front of the spectacular decorated steam engine of the American West. This was Lewis's entry to the 7th Lord Mayor's Parade for which it won Best Overall Entry. It took over 20,000 ribbon parcel bows to decorate the float. Four female staff are dressed as saloon girls complete with buttoned boots and Ostrich feather headdresses. There is a cowboy in the centre and the two North American indians are Neil Malloch, left, and Simon Riley, right, both from the Display Department of Lewis's on the Headrow. The Parade set off from Woodhouse Moor, seen here, then went down Woodhouse Lane, then Merrion Street and Vicar Lane, into Briggate then the Headrow, on to Calverley Street, past the Civic Hall to salute the Lord Mayor and finally returned to Woodhouse Moor.
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[7]
A Children's Ward, postcard (City Centre)
Black & White imagec1906. Postcard showing a children's ward, possibly at Leeds General Infirmary. A postmark of 21st December 1906 is stamped on the back.
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[8]
A young boy models a sailor suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. A little boy dressed in a Sailor Suit poses for the camera for the firm of clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. The trade in ready-to-wear tailoring for boys was an important part of the business at this time. The Sailor Suit was popular but there was also a demand for fancy dress and these were exported to Canada, Austrailia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. The boy in this image is is Herbert, whose father was a Machine Smith employed by Barran's, name of Arthur Giles. The Giles family are listed on the 1891 Census as living at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet. John Barran began his career in Leeds at the age of 22 with a small shop at number 30 Bridge End South. By 1851 he had moved to number 1 Briggate but his recognition of the potential of the new American invention of the sewing machine led him to opening a factory in Alfred Street. The business really took off when he worked with the firm of Greenwood and Batley to produce the band knife for bulk pattern cutting. The rapid expansion of the ready-to-wear business for Barran's in Leeds meant several moves. By the time the new warehouse in Chorley Lane opened in 1904, which adjoined the factory of 1888 in Hanover Lane, 3,000 people were in the employment of John Barran & Sons.
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[9]
A young boy models a suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. Image shows a young boy modelling a light-coloured suit with metal buttons and a waistcoat beneath, made by the clothing manufacturing firm of John Barran & Sons. The young boy is Walter Giles, born in 1880 at number 4 Waverley Street in Holbeck. He is the son of an employee of Barran's, a Machine Smith by the name of Arthur Giles. There was, at this time, a successful export trade in young boys' tailored clothing and a demand for miniature soldier's and sailor's uniforms and fancy dress. By 1891 John Barran's had a warehouse in an innovative building in St. Paul's Street, designed by Thomas Ambler and completed in 1877, now known as St. Paul's House. The firm also had a recently opened factory in Hanover Lane (1888). Later, in 1904, a further warehouse was built in Chorley Lane adjoining the Hanover Lane premises. By this time Barran's was employing 3,000 people, many of them women and young girls. The rapid growth of ready -to-wear tailoring business was due to the advancement in technology of such proccesses as pattern-cutting and sewing by machine, including blind stitching, button holing and buttoning.
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[10]
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, group portrait of the rescue team (Killingbeck)
Black & White image1940. Group portrait showing some of the members of the rescue team at the A.R.P. Rescue Centre in Selby Road. In charge of the unit is William Noel Slee who can be seen standing at the extreme left of the back row, wearing a white shirt and dark tie. Any other identifications are welcomed. The men were trained and equipped to respond to the aftermath of bombing raids during World War 2 and to rescue and evacuate casualties. Their work covered Leeds and surrounding areas but the unit was also called out to York and was in demand following the heavy bombing raids suffered by the population of Hull. The centre occupied a range of single storey buildings at the junction of Selby Road and the A.64. Although the buildings are now demolished the foundations remain. The road is now called Killingbeck Bridge.
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