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Results Found (2918), Result Page (1 of 584)
Search Aspect ( war )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Rockland; home of Francis Martineau Lupton and daughter Olive Middleton (Potternewton)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows Rockland, built during the 1870s in St. Mary's Road on the Newton Park Estate, which included both Potternewton Hall and Newton Hall. The estate had been owned by the Lupton family since the early 19th century. Rockland, an Arts and Crafts stone built house, was the residence of Francis Martineau Lupton Esq. Francis Martineau had been born on the Newton Park Estate at Potternewton Hall on 21st July 1848 and spent his boyhood there. The Luptons were an old Leeds Family with a strong sense of citizenship. A local politician, Francis' career included the chair of an improvement committee on the City Council, responsible for clearing the insanitary areas of York Street and Quarry Hill. He was an Alderman of Leeds between 1895 and 1916. Francis Martineau married Harriet Albina Davis (1850-1892) and they had two daughters and three sons. Their sons, Francis Ashford Lupton (1886-1917), Captain Maurice Lupton (1887-1915) and Lieutenant Lionel Martineau Lupton (1892-1916) were all killed in the First World War. In 1917 Francis Martineau Lupton gave up Rockland, letting it for the nominal annual rent of £1 for use as a home for the children of soldiers and sailors in memory of his sons. Later, he moved to Fieldhead, Park Avenue, Roundhay; he is listed in the Leeds Directories as residing at this address between 1917 and 1920. Also listed at Fieldhead in the 1920 Directory is solicitor Richard Noel Middleton. In 1914, Noel had married Olive Christiana Lupton (1881-1936) who had been born on the family's Newton Hall/Park Estate (Newton Grove). Within months, Francis Martineau had taken up residence at Rockland, the manor house built for his family and where Olive and her siblings would grow up. She later boarded at Roedean until 1900. Olive was one of two daughters of Francis Martineau; the other was Anne. Both daughters had inherited the family wool manufacturing business, William Lupton and Sons Ltd., upon their father's death. Olive's husband, Noel (d.1951), would become a managing director of the business which was sold to Hainsworth in 1958. Olive and Noel Middleton were the great grandparents of the present Duchess of Cambridge who, prior to her marriage to H.R.H. Prince William (1st Duke of Cambridge) was known as Catherine Elizabeth Middleton. Francis Martineau Lupton is known to have died from kidney failure at Low Gables, Allerton Park, on 5th February 1921. The house at Allerton Park called Low Gables was later occupied by James Harry Braime of the Hunslet engineering firm (1922 Directory). Rockland survives and is now surrounded by heavy-density housing.
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[2]
100th Post War Council House, Official Opening (Rothwell)
Black & White image12th May 1948 Group portrait for the official opening of the 100th Post War traditional house showing councillors and officials present.
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[3]
2nd Northern General Hospital, Beckett's Park, Training College (Headingley) (14 comments)
Black & White imageUndated, The teacher training college at Beckett's Park was built in 1913. During the First World War it was converted to a military hospital. It was officially called the 2nd Northern General Hospital but was more commonly referred to as Beckett's Park Hospital. There were 3200 beds and the hospital treated 57,200 soldiers between 1914 to 1918. The hospital was gradually returned to educational uses until the outbreak of the Second World War when it was used to treat the Dunkirk wounded. The college is now part of Leeds Metropolitan University.
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[4]
609 West Riding Squadron, Spitfire (Unknown) (3 comments)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows a Spitfire funded by the Leeds Spitfire fund with members of the 609 West Riding Squadron. When the fund was launched in 1940 nearly £30,000 was raised. The 609 was originally composed of volunteers and was based at Leeds Bradford Airport. They flew Spitfires and won distinction during the Battle of Britain, being the 1st Spitfire Squadron to shoot down 100 enemy aircraft. After the war they were disbanded but reformed in 1946 to fly Mosquitos until 1957 when they were completely disbanded. The Spitfire shown has the words "City of Leeds" on it but it is believed it is not the aircraft bearing that name, as this was lost in action before the photo was taken. The name was chalked on for the photo but the aircraft depicted is actually believed to be P8098 "Enfield".
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[5]
7th Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment (Leeds Rifles) 'C' Company's Scouting and Skirmishing Team (Little London) (4 comments)
Black & White imagec1911. Image shows a group portrait of 'C' Company's Scouting and Skirmishing Team, part of the 7th Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment (Leeds Rifles. They are pictured in front of a double doorway with their magnificent trophies. They were the winners of The Bingham Trophy, the enormous trophy seen centrally. It was manufactured in Sheffield in 1893 and is the largest piece of sterling silver hollow ware to be made at over three feet high and 11 feet in circumference. It cost £800 and was ordered by Colonel J.E. Bingham to be awarded to the winning Yorkshire Volunteers Battalion in the annual field-firing competition. The trophy disappeared from Brighouse Museum in the 1940s and has not been traced since. The team pictured are also the winners of the West Yorkshire Brigade Challenge Cup and the Robinson Cup, 1911 (a piece of plate worth £15 presented by Lieutenant Colonel Robinson). The soldiers are identified as; back row, from left to right, Rifleman J. Houston, Rifleman O. Smith (Reserve), Rifleman H. Walton. Middle Row, from left to right, Rifleman W. Lockwood, Lance Corporal F. Patrick, Corporal G. Stoyle, Rifleman A.P. Smith, Corporal J.P. Bartle. Front row, Lance Sergeant C. Schutz, Captain George E. St. C. Stockwell, Sergeant H. Schutz and finally Corporal P. Denbeigh. Several of these young men did not survive the Great War. The photograph is likely to have been taken outside Carlton Barracks in Carlton Hill, the home of the Leeds Rifles between 1887 and 1969.
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