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Results Found (1296), Result Page (1 of 260)
Search Aspect (Briggate )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Plaza Cinema, Assembly Rooms, 32 New Briggate (City Centre) (45 comments)
Black & White image1970. View showing the Plaza Cinema at 32 New Briggate. The building, designed by George Corson and James Robertson Watson of Leeds, opened as the Assembly Rooms Concert Hall in 1898. It became a cinema on Monday 15th April 1907 advertising "new century talking and singing pictures". The opening picture was a film showing the stage act of 'Little Tich', an English music hall comedian whose real name was Harry Relph. The picture house was able to seat an audience of 1,100 and admission charges were: front circle 2/- (10p) and 1/6d (7.5p), side circle and stalls 1/- (5p), area 6d (2.5p) and gallery 3d (1p). The name changed to the 'Plaza' on Monday 25th August 1958 until its closure in 1985. The Assembly Rooms are now (Nov. 2007) being restored as part of the major Grand Theatre refurbishments.
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[2]
7th Lord Mayor's Annual Parade, Lewis's 'Fells Wargo Railway Co.' (City Centre) (2 comments)
Colour image21st June 1980. Image shows proud members of Lewis's 'Fells Wargo Railway Co.'(A humorous play on words with reference to 'Wells Fargo', of course). They pose in their colourful costumes in front of the spectacular decorated steam engine of the American West. This was Lewis's entry to the 7th Lord Mayor's Parade for which it won Best Overall Entry. It took over 20,000 ribbon parcel bows to decorate the float. Four female staff are dressed as saloon girls complete with buttoned boots and Ostrich feather headdresses. There is a cowboy in the centre and the two North American indians are Neil Malloch, left, and Simon Riley, right, both from the Display Department of Lewis's on the Headrow. The Parade set off from Woodhouse Moor, seen here, then went down Woodhouse Lane, then Merrion Street and Vicar Lane, into Briggate then the Headrow, on to Calverley Street, past the Civic Hall to salute the Lord Mayor and finally returned to Woodhouse Moor.
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[3]
A postcard of Briggate (Main Street) (Garforth)
Black & White imageearly 20th century. This view was taken of Briggate in the early twentieth century and became a postcard. On the right is Colliery Row and beyond is Eagle House. Most of the street was still dwellings houses, and the lack of traffic allowed the children to stop and look in the middle of the road.
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[4]
A Remnant of Old Briggate, postcard (City Centre) (8 comments)
Black & White imageUndated. This postcard, entitled 'A Remnant of Old Briggate', shows no. 56, one of the oldest buildings on Briggate. It was built in 1613 by Richard Sykes, who became an Alderman of Leeds in 1629, having been a key figure in the campaign for the granting of Leeds' Charter of Incorporation in 1626. The building is occupied here by F. Wallis, hosier and glover; the words 'Ye Olde Stone Shoppe' are seen above the name, and a panel above this says 'RS1613'. It was taken over by Timpsons's Shoes in 1919 and demolished by them in 1955 to make way for a new shop. The entrance to the Pack Horse Inn Yard is incoporated into the building on the left.
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[5]
A young boy models a sailor suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. A little boy dressed in a Sailor Suit poses for the camera for the firm of clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. The trade in ready-to-wear tailoring for boys was an important part of the business at this time. The Sailor Suit was popular but there was also a demand for fancy dress and these were exported to Canada, Austrailia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. The boy in this image is is Herbert, whose father was a Machine Smith employed by Barran's, name of Arthur Giles. The Giles family are listed on the 1891 Census as living at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet. John Barran began his career in Leeds at the age of 22 with a small shop at number 30 Bridge End South. By 1851 he had moved to number 1 Briggate but his recognition of the potential of the new American invention of the sewing machine led him to opening a factory in Alfred Street. The business really took off when he worked with the firm of Greenwood and Batley to produce the band knife for bulk pattern cutting. The rapid expansion of the ready-to-wear business for Barran's in Leeds meant several moves. By the time the new warehouse in Chorley Lane opened in 1904, which adjoined the factory of 1888 in Hanover Lane, 3,000 people were in the employment of John Barran & Sons.
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