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Results Found (19), Result Page (1 of 1)
Search Aspect (COOKRIDGE STREET )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street Baths10th October 1907 Building work on the foundations of the baths is being carried out.
[2]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street BathsUndated. Possibly early 1900s. Rear view of building, showing windows, out building with child in lower right corner.
[3]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre) (12 comments)
Cookridge Street Baths17th November 1928. Also known as Oriental and General baths. Designed by Cuthbert Brodrick, costing £13,000, the baths were opened in 1867. With some alterations in 1882, they remained in use until finally closing in the late 1960s and subsequently being demolished, the only one of Cuthbert Brodrick's buildings in Leeds to suffer this fate. The site is now part of Millennium Square. This view shows the central entrance with notice for 'Ladies Turkish Bath'. There are separate entrance for men on the right, and women on the left. Posters extoll the benefits of 'sunbaths' for health.
[4]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street Baths16th May 1929 Kiosk for payment in the entrance, with metal barriers to prevent people gaining unauthorised access.
[5]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street Baths16th May 1929. Opened in 1867, the baths were designed by Cuthbert Brodrick and cost £13,000 to build. They were closed and demolished in the late 1960s. This view is of the entrance with the kiosk for payment on the left.
[6]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street BathsUndated, possibly early 1900s. Rear view of the building with windows. To the left is a block of outside toilets. On the right corner a garden has washing hanging out. A series of wooden panels obscure the view of the house from the windows of the baths.
[7]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street BathsUndated Possibly early 1900s. Back view of baths. To the left, a block of outside toilets. To the right corner of a garden with line of washing. These houses were facing Portland Crescent. A number of wooden panels have been placed in the garden to protect the privacy of occupants, who were directly overlooked from both windows.
[8]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street BathsUndated Possbly early 1900s. View of entrance door to the rear of baths, building work is taking place. An outside toilet is to the right. Portland Crescent is in view.
[9]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street Baths17th November 1928. Also known as the Oriental and General baths, these baths designed by Cuthbert Brodrick cost £13,000 and were opened in 1867. With some alterations in 1882, they remained in use until finally closing and being demolished in the late 1960s. The site is now part of Millennium Square. This view is looking across from the Civic Theatre, by the corner of Rossington Street.
[10]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street Baths10th October 1907 Remedial work is being carried out on defective brickwork.
[11]Cookridge Street Baths (City Centre)
Cookridge Street BathsUndated. Possibly early 1900s. To the left is Portland Crescent, the back wall of the baths is on the right. Just in front of the wall are panels of wood, mounted on a tall frame. The panels are situated to protect the privacy of householders, should people be looking out from the windows of the baths. In the centre is an outside toilet and gas lamp.
[12]Cookridge Street Baths, female swimmers (City Centre)
Cookridge Street Baths, female swimmersUndated. View showing a group of female swimmers at Cookridge Street Baths.
[13]Cookridge Street Baths, Proposed Design (City Centre) (2 comments)
Cookridge Street Baths, Proposed DesignUndated, View shows Cuthbert Brodrick's original design for the Oriental and General Baths on Cookridge Street. The swimming pool opened on 28 July 1866 and the Turkish baths later that year although construction work on the whole building was not completed until 1867. Bands of coloured brickwork and Indian-style ornamentation gave the building a truly oriental feel. The completed building did not include the minaret tower which was substituted for a large dome. The building was also smaller, there being only five windows on each side of the central portion, rather than the six in the proposed design. In 1882 however, the building was extended and considerably altered. The domes were removed and replaced by pyramid shaped towers and roof gables. The two windows on either side of the main entrance, in this view were converted into separate entrances for men and women. The Oriental Baths were demolished sometime in the late 1960s and the site now forms part of Millennium Square.
[14]Cookridge Street, Baths (City Centre) (2 comments)
Cookridge Street, Baths1946. View of the empty premises of Cookridge Street Baths. The baths were designed by Cuthbert Brodrick and opened in 1867. Photograph was taken to show proposed site for car parking accomodation.
[15]Cookridge Street, Brodrick Buildings (City Centre)
Cookridge Street, Brodrick Buildings31st January 1967 Image shows Brodrick's Buildings, built 1864, one of a few smaller buildings, originally designed as shops and chambers by Cuthbert Brodrick, architect of the Town Hall, Corn Exchange and Mechanics Institute (Civic Theatre). On the left is number 43 the home of the Leeds Civic Arts Guild while numbers 45 to 57 on the right stand empty. In the window a poster promotes the play Life is a Dream at the Civic Theatre. Today the ground floor houses a popular city centre bar. Just visible on the left of the image are Brodrick's Oriental Baths, closed on the 4th of February 1965 and now the site of Millennium Square. During the construction of the square original white tiles belonging to the bath were found.
[16]Cookridge Street, Brodrick's Buildings (City Centre)
Cookridge Street, Brodrick31st January 1967 Image shows Brodrick's Buildings, built in 1864, one of a few smaller buildings originally designed as shops and chambers by Cuthbert Brodrick, architect of the Town Hall, Corn Exchange and Mechanics Institute (Civic Theatre). On the left number 43 is the home of the Leeds Civic Arts Guild while numbers 45 to 51 on the right are empty. The ground floor is today used by a bar. Just visible on the left of the image are Brodrick's Oriental Baths, which closed in the late 1960s and were demolished. Today the site is used by Millennium Square.
[17]Cookridge Street, Electric Press building (City Centre)
Cookridge Street, Electric Press building1946. View of the Electric Press building looking from Cookridge Street formerly the premises of Chorley and Pickersgill Printers. Cookridge Street baths can be seen on right side for proposed car parking accomodation
[18]Leeds Alpine Sun Baths Cookridge Street (City Centre) (2 comments)
Leeds Alpine Sun Baths Cookridge Street29th July 1927. A young boy demonstates the benefit of the Alpine Sun Baths at the City Baths, Cookridge Street. These were designed by Cuthbert Brodrick and also known as the Oriental and General baths. The boy wears regulation Leeds City Baths bathing trunks and protective eye goggles. These goggles are also worn by the Lord and Lady Mayoress, Alderman Hugh Lupton and his wife. Ella to protect their eyes from the reflective rays of the two enormous sun lamps. Theraputic sunbathing or 'Sun cure' was a widely prescribed medical treatment for such diverse conditions as ricketts, tuberculosis, cholera, viral pneumonia, bronchial asthma, gout, jaundice and severe wounds. The treatment of light therapy became less prescribed after the first antibiotics were developed in 1938.
[19]York Road Library, projecting clock (Richmond Hill)
York Road Library, projecting clock2007. Image shows a close-up of the projecting clock at second floor level on the front elevation of York Road Libary & Public Baths. The building opened in 1904 on the southern side of York Road and is now Grade II listed. The clock, which is carried on a console bracket, was made by William Potts & Sons, watch and clockmakers, and goldsmiths of Guildford Street, 19 & 21 Cookridge Street and Alexander Street. The clock was set in motion on 23rd August 1904, but has not been keeping time in recent years. The mechanism is a Gravity Escapement designed by Lord Grimthorpe, Sir Edmund Beckett (Edmund Denison).