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Results Found (54), Result Page (1 of 3)
Search Aspect (LOWERHEAD ROW )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Bradleys Yard (City Centre)
Black & White image30th April 1924. Bradleys Yard which was just number 5 Lower Headrow. Narrow Alleyway with commercial properties eitherside. A man stands in doorway to building which was premises of J.H. Broadbent, Shopfitter.
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[2]
Briggate (City Centre) (1 comment)
Black & White imageUndated, An early twentieth century view of Briggate looking South from the junction with the Headrow. Windows are being cleaned on the left, the young chap posing for the camera has just been emptied his bucket in the drain. On the left hand corner of Lowerhead Row, there is Firth's (G E Verity), Milliner offering Stylish Millinery at lowest prices. On the right side on the corner is E Hick & Co Drapers at number 87. A Leeds City Tramways tram rattles up Briggate on its way to Harehills Road. An advert for Mother Shipton's Soap is displayed on the front.
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[3]
Briggate in the snow, watercolour painting by Pete Lapish (City Centre) (2 comments)
Colour imagec1900. Impressionistic watercolour by Pete Lapish showing Briggate in the snow c 1900. It was originally painted as a Christmas card commission. The trams are open-topped, typical of a date before 1905. They are displaying their original livery of chocolate, amber and ivory. At the left edge is number 33 Briggate, the premises of Suttons Ltd., mantle manufacturers, located at the junction with Boar Lane. The view is in the direction of the Headrow, or Upperhead and Lowerhead Row as it was known in those days. More of Pete Lapish's images can be seen on his website www.petelapish.art
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[4]
Briggate in the summertime, watercolour painting by Pete Lapish (City Centre) (2 comments)
Colour imagec1910. View of Briggate in the summertime in contrast with the wintry scene depicted in ID 201039_170439, both watercolour paintings by Yorkshire artist, Pete Lapish. Boots Cash Chemists can be seen on the right, located at the junction with King Edward Street. The facade of the building is decorated with elaborate signage, some of which will be illuminated in the evenings. Awnings are raised to protect the window displays from the sunshine. This run of ornate buildings, including the Boots premises, the Leeds Empire Palace Theatre (with statue at the apex) and the twin domes either side of Queen Victoria Street, was designed by London architect, Frank Matcham for the Leeds Estate Company in the late 1890s/early 1900s. This is all nowadays part of the upmarket shopping sector, the Victoria Quarter. The view is in the direction of the Headrow, or Upperhead and Lowerhead Row as it was known then. More of Pete Lapish's images can be seen on his website www.petelapish.art
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[5]
Briggate looking towards the junction of Upperhead Row and Lowerhead Row (City Centre) (10 comments)
Black & White image1910. View of Briggate looking towards the junction of Upperhead Row and Lowerhead Row, (since the 1930s known as The Headrow.) Two motor cars are visible, the one nearest the foreground with a uniformed chauffeur. There is a horse-drawn cab and a man pushing a handcart. A sign for the White Bear Inn can be seen on a lamp, left, but we could not find a record of this inn in old directories of Leeds. The conical tower at the entrance to the Thornton's Arcade is seen in the background, left of the centre.
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[6]
Briggate, looking towards Upperhead and Lowerhead Rows, watercolour painting by Pete Lapish (City Centre)
Colour imagec1900. Watercolour painting by Leeds artist, Pete Lapish, showing Briggate under a covering of snow. The view is in the direction of the Headrow, or Upperhead Row and Lowerhead Row as it was known then, and dates from before 1905 when the open-topped trams were still in operation. Boots Cash Chemists, occupying numbers 112, 113 and 114 Briggate at the junction with King Edward Street, are advertising Christmas Trees for sale. To the left of Boots the ornate building of the Empire Music Hall designed by Frank Matcham is visible, with the statue on the top. More of Pete Lapish's images can be seen on his website www.petelapish.art
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[7]
Briggate, 'lunchtime', painting by Pete Lapish (City Centre) (1 comment)
Colour imagec1913. View of Briggate during the lunch period in this painting by Yorkshire artist, Pete Lapish. Briggate is thronged with people and the road is busy with open vestibuled trams in their smart chocolate and amber livery. There are other vehicles in sight, including a couple of horse-drawn carts. The view is north, in the direction of the Headrow, which in those days was known as Upperhead and Lowerhead Row. In the foreground, left, on the corner of Briggate with Boar Lane, there is the Saxone and Sorosis Shoe Company at number 33 Briggate. Above Saxone's is the sign for the Cafe Royale which had an entrance in Boar Lane at number 72, and was run by Miss Jessie Rose Brotherton. On the other side of Briggate is Lockharts, a branch of one of their seven Cocoa Houses in the city centre, including four just in Briggate. These became fashionable in the 1880s and remained open until the 1930s. The view is in the direction of the Headrow although it was known as Upperhead and Lowerhead Row in those days. More of Pete Lapish's images can be seen on his website www.petelapish.art
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[8]
Briggate, Old Corn Exchange (City Centre) (1 comment)
Black & White imageUndated. Old photograph (pre 1868) of the top end of Briggate showing the old Corn Exchange building in the centre. This was situated just to the north of the junction of Upperhead Row and Lowerhead Row, now part of New Briggate. The building was designed by Samuel Chapman of Leeds, the foundation stone was laid by John Cawood on 31st May 1826 and it opened for trade in 1829. The clock at the top and the statue of Queen Anne, seen in the arch in the centre of the building, had previously been in the Moot Hall, demolished in 1825-26. The statue can now be seen in the City Art Gallery. The old Corn Exchange was demolished in 1868-69 after the present Corn Exchange, which was built to replace it, had opened in 1863.
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[9]
Briggate, painting by Pete Lapish (City Centre)
Colour imageUndated. Painting by Pete Lapish depicting a scene on Briggate from around the early 20th century. The view looks south from New Briggate across Lowerhead Row (left) and Upperhead Row (right). The building with the tower in the centre of the picture is the entrance to Thornton's Arcade, opened in 1877. More of Pete Lapish's images can be seen on his website www.petelapish.art
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[10]
Briggate, showing the Empire Palace Theatre, tinted postcard (City Centre)
Colour imageUndated. Tinted postcard view of Briggate looking in the direction of the Headrow or Upperhead Row and Lowerhead Row as it was known then. At the right side is the frontage of the Empire Palace Theatre which opened in Briggate on 29th August 1898 as a music hall. It was built to designs by London architect Frank Matcham. The theatre had a lead, flat roof, part of which was mounted on rails. This section could be moved back in good weather to provide a large ventilation opening, probably to remove build up of smoke from the smokers in the audience. The cast iron and glass canopy over the entrance was demolished c1949-50 as a safety measure. The Empire Theatre closed in 1961 and was demolished in 1962. The site became the Empire Arcade before the present store, Harvey Nichols was opened. In the centre the junction with Queen Victoria Street is visible. In 1990 the street was given a stained glass roof as part of the £6 million Victoria Quarter Scheme. The postcard is stamped October 1905.
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[11]
Headrow nos. 17 - 21, (Lowerhead Row) (City Centre) (3 comments)
Black & White image1891 View of what was then called Lowerhead Row, July 1891. In the centre of the photo (right side) a sign can be seen for oysters, this was outside number 17 Richardson and Cousins Oyster Rooms. To the right is the entrance to the Marquis of Granby Yard. Next 18 was the premises of Herman Wolfe, a wardrobe dealer (who would be selling clothes). Between 18 and 19 is an alley leading into the Unicorn Yard. The Unicorn public house is number 19, licensee Rueben Schofield. The next shop is that of James Brown, practical watchmaker at 20, last on the right and partly in view, 21 was another clothing shop, business of June Towler. Four of these properties are marked with Templar Crosses. There is one to the left of the Oyster sign on 17, above the window of 18 is a notice with a cross directly above it. Between the two upper windows of the Unicorn Inn another can be seen and to the right of the upper window of number 20 a cross is clearly visible. Crosses are displayed on property which was once part of the Manor of Whitkirk. The order of the Knights Templar was founded in 1118/9, during the Crusades, their primary role was to protect pilgrims on the road to Jerusalem. The Church and Manor of Whitkirk was given o the Templars who established a preceptory and founded the Temple Newsam estate in 1155 it included property in the town of Leeds. There were 6 crosses on the Lowerhead Row and Lady Lane, 10 on Templar Strreet, in all 19 crosses were displayed in the city.
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[12]
Kings Arms Yard, Lowerhead Row (City Centre)
Black & White image1928. View shows Kings Arms Yard, off Lowerhead Row, looking north towards Harrison Street. At the end of the yard Jack Heaps, commission agent and Lazarus Freeman, tailor can be identified. A gas lamp is by the wall and in the foreground is a motorbike. Over the wall is Atkinson Court. At the end of the court is Taylor & Co, tailors.
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[13]
Kings Arms Yard, Lowerhead Row (City Centre)
Black & White image1928. Image shows Kings Arms Yard, off Lowerhead Row, looking north-east towards Harrison Street. Part of the sign for Jack Heaps, commission agent, can be seen on the small building while up the steps next to it, the premises of Lazarus Freeman, tailor, are identified by a sign. A gas lamp is on the left of the picture.
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[14]
Kings Arms Yard, Lowerhead Row, looking south (City Centre)
Black & White image10th September 1928. Kings Arms Yard, off Lowerhead Row, looking south. A horse pulling a cart can be seen through the entrance in the background. Part of the yard has already been pulled down and the rest would soon demolished as part of the plans to widen Lowerhead Row and convert it into part of The Headrow.
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[15]
Lewis's construction site, the Headrow (City Centre)
Black & White image27th August 1931. Image shows the construction site of the new Lewis's department store to be built in the Headrow. At this time the Headrow was undergoing substantial alterations including widening to 80 feet. The Headrow is a major thoroughfare in the city centre which runs from east to west. This view looks west towards the tower of the Town Hall. It is possible to see, left, just how narrow the Headrow (formerly Lowerhead Row) had been before Sir Reginald Blomfield, a London architect, re-designed it. Lewis's was to be constructed in brick and faced with 40 thousand cubic feet of Portland stone. Other landmarks include the distant spire of St. George's Church in Great George Street, right of centre, and, further to the right, at the junction of Cookridge Street with Great George Street, is the tower of St. Anne's Cathedral.
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[16]
Lewis's Contruction site looking west towards the Town Hall (City Centre)
Black & White image27th August 1931. View of Lewis's constuction site looking west towards the Town Hall. This shows the huge depth of the site after excavations were completed. Several workmen are visible, one breaking up rock with a pick axe. In the background, left, the Headrow is a hive of activity with people undergoing their daily business with the road actually in the process of being widened. A team of workers, in shirt sleeves and flat caps, are employed in construction work and the site is cordoned off from vehicles and pedestrians. It is possible to see just how narrow the Headrow (Lowerhead Row) was previously from this photograph. It was widened to 80 feet on the north side and involved the demolition of many properties. Sir Reginald Theadore Blomfield, a London Architect was responsible for the new frontage to the Headrow and the work commenced in 1927. In the centre background the dome and clocktower of the Town Hall are visible. In front of it is the 1930 Lloyd's Bank building which was built in accordace with Sir Reginald Blomfield's plans to designs by architects Kitson, Parish, Ledgard and Pyman. The Portland stone building is nowadays part of the Light complex and houses the 147 bedroom Radisson SAS Hotel. Woodhouse Lane runs across the centre of mid ground and, to the right centre is the decorative gable of the City Hotel between the junctions of Wormald Row, and De Grey Street with Woodhouse Lane. Harrison's Almshouses are at the right edge.
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[17]
Lewis's Department Store, the Headrow, sign announcing the Golden Jubilee (City Centre)
Colour imageSeptember 1982. A sign in green and gold is one of many throughout the store in celebration of the Golden Jubilee of Lewis's in the Headrow. The landmark department store opened on 17th September 1932 and over 120,000 people attended the opening as it was one of the largest stores in the North of England in its day. The firm originated in Liverpool with a small tailoring business started by David Lewis in 1856. The needs of the working classes were changing and Lewis tapped into the increased purchasing power by providing reasonably priced ready made clothing and household goods. His slogan was 'Lewis's, the Friends of the People'. Soon there were huge stores not only in Liverpool, but Manchester, Glasgow and Birmingham. Leeds was under going a transformation on the Headrow by the late 1920s and Sir Reginald Blomfield, a London architect re-designed the very narrow Upperhead and Lowerhead Rows to form a wide avenue from west to east of the city centre. The new Lewis's, on its island site, was to fit in with other buildings designed for the new look Headrow and was finished in 40,000 cubic feet of Portland stone.
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[18]
Lower Briggate, looking north (City Centre)
Black & White imageUndated. Early view of Lower Briggate looking north towards the junction with Boar Lane. The junction with Upperhead and Lower Headrow (The Headrow as it is known now) is in the distance. On the left is the business of Dyson & Sons, wholesale watchmakers & jeweller's at numbers 24, 25 and 26. The well-known landmark Dyson's clock is visible. Several horse-drawn vehicles are visible including a coach pulled by white horses.
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[19]
Lower Headrow (City Centre)
Black & White imageUndated, An early view of the Lower Headrow (Lowerhead Row as it was then called) before widening looking towards the Town Hall. On the left at no 26 is the Malt Shovel, at no 31 The Three Legs Inn and further down The Vine Public House. Youngman's fish shop can be seen on the right. Henry Robert Youngman moved from Londonin 1882 to open a shop in Hunslet in 1885. He eventually opened this shop in Lower Headrow with restaurant facilities. Road widening forced a move to New Briggate.
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[20]
Lower Headrow nos. 17 - 20 (City Centre)
Black & White image1920s View of Lower Headrow as it was named then, one of Leeds original streets. Far left is some advertising and goods for sale outside number 17, a cycle dealers and hardware shop run by Mrs Annie Lewis. A large brass key is suspended from the wall and a sign says 'scrap metal wanted'. A hackney carriage with 25 seats is advertised. Next, is the arched entrance to the Marquis of Granby Yard followed by Herman Wolfe, clothier at number 18, where a Knight's Templar cross can be seen on the wall above. At number 19 is Youngman & Sons, fish restauant, open every dinner time from 11.30am - 1.30pm and serving fish and chips, bread and butter, tea, coffee and cocoa, mineral waters and cigarettes. This was formerly the Unicorn Public House. Adjacent at number 20, is Tolson's noted tripe shop, run by tripe dresser, Mrs Isabella Tolson. Far right are the junctions of North Street and Vicar Lane.
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