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Results Found (31), Result Page (1 of 1)
Search Aspect (WEST INDIAN CARNIVAL )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]Carnival Queen 1986, Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Carnival Queen 1986, Leeds West Indian CarnivalAugust 1986. Image shows the Carnival Queen chosen for 1986 at the Leeds West Indian Carnival, held annually. She is Lisa Condor and her elaborate costume of a sea anemone was designed by her brother, Hubon Condor.
[2]Chapeltown Road, day of the Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Chapeltown Road, day of the Leeds West Indian Carnival25th August 1980. Crowds are gathered in Chapeltown Road on August Bank Holiday Monday, (25th August, 1980) to view the procession of the thirteenth West Indian Carnival to be held in Leeds since its beginnings in 1967. A group of youngsters have claimed a higher vantage point on top of a bus shelter. The procession was to leave Potternewton Park at 2pm to follow a route along Harehills Lane, Roundhay Road, Barrack Road, Chapeltown Road and Harehills Avenue before entering the park again for the judging of the elaborate and colourful costumes of the troupes and individuals, and of the steel bands. In the background are shops and businesses in Chapeltown Road, including Dispensing Chemist, D.A. Taylor, addressed as New Savile Parade, 139 Chapeltown Road, and Warsaw Stores, Delicatessen and Barbecue at number 151 Chapeltown Road. On carnival day the Polish Warsaw Stores did a brisk trade in salami, ice cream, crips and cool beers.
[3]Civic Hall, Nelson Mandela makes a speech (City Centre)
Civic Hall, Nelson Mandela makes a speech30th April 2001. Image taken in the Council Chamber of the Civic Hall where Nelson Mandela, the former South African President, has risen to make a speech. Seated to his left is the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Bernard Atha and beside the Lord Mayor is the Chief Executive of Leeds City Council, Paul Rogerson. The lady in cream on the right is the Lady Mayoress of Leeds, Susan Pitter. For many years she had helped organise Leeds West Indian Carnival.
[4]Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian CarnivalUndated. View of a young woman wearing a colourful and elaborate costume created for the Leeds West Indian Carnival. She is dressed in blue and is supporting a white 'cage' on her shoulders where fish appear to be swimming in and out. A huge canopy of flames in red, orange and gold fan out behind her. The very first West Indian Carnival in Britain was held in Leeds in 1967. This year (2007) has been the 40th anniversary of the Leeds West Indian Carnival and marks the Bi-centenary of 200 years since the end of the slave trade. It also coincides with the 800th year of Leeds as a city. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
[5]Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian CarnivalUndated. In the view a child demonstrates the waving tentacles of this purple, octopus like creature costume at the Leeds West Indian Carnival. Many people have gathered in Potternewton Park for the occasion, which is held over the August Bank Holiday weekend. In the park there is a wide variety of entertainment and stalls providing all kinds of Carribean food and refreshments. The carnival is in the 40th year (2007) since it's origins in 1967. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
[6]Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian CarnivalUndated. View of one of the fantastic creations designed and worn for the Leeds West Indian Carnival which has been held over the August Bank Holiday weekend each year since 1967. The costume, in gold and white, consists of a many layered skirt, a gold sequinned top and a huge circular head dress trimmed with white ostrich feathers. The wearer's face is partially concealed by a gold mask. The Leeds West Indian Carnival assembles in Potternewton Park and forms a procession of floats and dancers proceeding along Harehills Avenue, down Roundhay Road in Harehills, along Barrack Road and back along Chapeltown Road returning to Potternewton Park once more. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
[7]Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian CarnivalUndated. Image shows children and young people dressed in a colourful array of costumes in the procession of Leeds West Indian Carnival. The participants assemble in Potternewton Park each August Bank Holiday before the procession leads off along Harehills Avenue, down Roundhay Road in Harehills, along Barrack Road and back along Chapeltown Road. The festivities culminate in Potternewton Park where there is music, entertainment and traditional Caribbean food on sale at various stalls. The West Indian Carnival is the oldest in Europe and began in 1967. One of the original organisers, the Carnival Chairman, Arthur France is also responsible for designing some of the fantastic creations worn. He came to Britain from the Caribbean Island of Nevis and introduced the Carnival as a positive way of improving community relations and as a celebration of black culture, artistry and performance. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
[8]Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian CarnivalUndated. Image shows the happy, smiling faces of three children, capturing the spirit of the Leeds West Indian Carnival. This year (2007) will be the 40th anniversary of the carnival, the oldest in Europe. It is also the bi-centenary of the end of the slave trade and the 800th year since Leeds received its charter as a city. Carnivals originated in the Caribbean, like the ones of Trinidad and St. Kitts-Nevis, and were a way of showing a strength of spirit amongst the people in a positive way. The carnival is a vehicle for artistic expression and imagination in the design of the fantastic, larger than life costumes in a riot of colours. Music, dancing and food are other traditional elements that make the Leeds West Indian Carnival a unique experience for all members of the community. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar
[9]Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian CarnivalUndated. View of three young people in their carnival creations at the Leeds West Indian Carnival, held on August Bank Holiday Weekend of each year since 1967. The carnival attracts over 100,000 people along with steel bands and sound system D.Js. The Carnival committee is very much involved in the the design and making of the costumes organising training workshops in which local school children are encouraged to participate. Here, a variety of materials, including sequinned fabrics and feathers, have been used to create these vibrant costumes. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
[10]Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian CarnivalUndated. Image shows a group of people dressed red and yellow costumes with elaborate headdresses. They are taking part in the Leeds West Indian Carnival held annually in Potternewton Park since 1967. It is an opportunity to celebrate music, dance, performance and art in West Indian culture, and is attended by over 100,000 people from all sections of the community. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
[11]Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian CarnivalUndated. Image shows a young girl in colourful costume dancing at the Leeds West Indian Carnival held each August Bank Holiday Weekend in Potternewton Park. On the Sunday before carnival weekend boys and girls compete for the title of Carnival Prince or Princess in costume. The Carnival Queen show is on the Friday of the August Bank Holiday Weekend when female members of the community show off their creations. These are themed and often feature birds, butterflies and other representations of the Caribbean Islands. On the Sunday night it is the turn of the men at the Carnival Monach show when they will perform satirical Calypsos which they have written for the occasion. J'Ouvert or 'the opening' is the early beginning of the Carnival on the Bank Holiday Monday morning when people parade in their party clothes. At 2.00 pm in Potternewton Park the festivities get underway with the arrival of the steel bands and sound systems playing Soca music. The procession then follows a route along Harehills Avenue down Roundhay Road in Harehills, along Barrack Road and back to Potternewton Park along Chapeltown Road. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
[12]Leeds West Indian Carnival Procession, Chapeltown Road (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival Procession, Chapeltown Road25th August 1980. Crowds of people line the route of the 13th West Indian Carnival procession. This is Chapeltown Road and, in the background, Warsaw Stores with its Polish delicatessen is visible at number 151. The stores were always busy selling refreshments to the onlookers on carnival day. Since 1967 Leeds West Indian Carnival has been a permanent fixture for August Bank Holiday and is a much anticipated event. Here, a group of young people are passing by, wearing conical hats with streamers and carrying flags.
[13]Leeds West Indian Carnival Procession, Chapeltown Road (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival Procession, Chapeltown Road25th August 1980. View of some of the participants in the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival procession as it proceeds along Chapeltown Road. They are wearing hooded all-in-one suits decorated with stars. In the background onlookers line the road and behind them is the dispensing chemist, D.A. Taylor at number 139 Chapeltown Road. The procession continued on to Harehills Avenue before re-entering Potternewton Park, where it began. The judging for the bands, individuals and troupes then took place and the winners were announced.
[14]Leeds West Indian Carnival, Carnival Queen for 1989, pictured with the Lord Mayor of Leeds (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, Carnival Queen for 1989, pictured with the Lord Mayor of LeedsAugust 1989. Image taken at the annual Leeds West Indian Carnival showing the Carnival Queen chosen for 1989, Ms Sheila Haworth, in her costume on the theme of 'Rainbow of Peace.' She is pictured with the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Les Carter and the Lady Mayoress. The designer of the elaborate costume was Mr. Kam Sangra, foreground. Both the Carnival Queen and the winning designer won the prize of a holiday in the Caribbean.
[15]Leeds West Indian Carnival, Carnival Queen pictured with the Lord Mayor of Leeds (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, Carnival Queen pictured with the Lord Mayor of LeedsAugust 1989. View of the Carnival Queen, Ms. Sheila Haworth, in her elaborate 'Rainbow of Peace' costume, designed by Mr. Kam Sangra. She is pictured with the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Les Carter and the Lady Mayoress. Leeds West Indian Carnival is an annual event and was founded in 1967 by Arthur France and Ian Charles. 2009 was the 42nd anniversary of the Leeds West Indian Carnival.
[16]Leeds West Indian Carnival, girl in costume in Potternewton Park (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, girl in costume in Potternewton Park25th August 1980. Image shows a young girl in a glittering carnival costume in Potternewton Park. Layers of feather-like decorations are suspended from a yoke balanced on her shoulders as she stands with outstreched arms. She wears a close-fitting cap on her head and a mask with eyes. Children and young people are gathered behind her. This is the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival since it was founded in 1967.
[17]Leeds West Indian Carnival, Pan Player for Huddersfield's North Stars Steel Band (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, Pan Player for Huddersfield25th August 1980. Image shows a Pan player of Huddersfield's North Stars Steel Band, here for the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival. The photograph has been taken in Potternewton Park, the assembly point for the bands, troupes and individuals taking part in the carnival procession on August Bank Holiday Monday, 1980.
[18]Leeds West Indian Carnival, Portrait of a Pan Player (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, Portrait of a Pan Player25th August 1980. Portrait of a Pan Player in one of the steel bands taking part in the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival on August Bank Holiday Monday, 1980. The photograph was taken in Potternewton Park, an assembly point for the carnival procession which comprised a lively mix of bands, individuals and troupes, many wearing exotic beautifully detailed costumes. After completing a route taking in Harehills Lane, Roundhay Road, Barrack Road, Chapeltown Road and Harehills Avenue, the procession returned to Potternewton Park where the winners of each category were announced; 'Troupes', 'Individuals' and 'Steel Bands'.
[19]Leeds West Indian Carnival, Potternewton Park (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, Potternewton Park25th August 1980. Image taken in Potternewton Park on the 25th August, 1980 (August Bank Holiday Monday), the day of the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival. Costumed troupes, dancers and steel bands assembled in the park ready for the 2.00pm procession, which followed a route along Harehills Lane, Roundhay Road, Barrack Road, Chapeltown Road and Harehills Avenue before returning to the park for the judging of groups and indiviuals taking part. The event was launched by the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Eric Atkinson. Members of one of the steel bands are seen in the foreground.
[20]Leeds West Indian Carnival, students from CHALCS (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, students from CHALCSAugust 1989. Image shows students from CHALCS taking part in the annual Leeds West Indian Carnival. CHALCS stands for the Chapeltown and Harehills Assisted Learning Computer School found by Mr. B.T. Braimah. Based at Technorth in Harrogate Road, it aimed to give children tuition in computing and new techology in school holidays and at weekends.
[21]Leeds West Indian Carnival, the Carnival Queen 1989 (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, the Carnival Queen 1989August 1989. Image shows the Carnival Queen chosen for 1989, at the Leeds West Indian Carnival. She is Ms. Sheila Haworth and her costume, representing a Rainbow of Peace, was designed by Mr. Kam Sangra. Leeds West Indian Carnival has been running since 1967 and is a popular annual event.
[22]Leeds West Indian Carnival, young girl in costume (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, young girl in costume25th August 1980. Photograph of a young girl in Potternewton Park dressed in her exotic and beautiful costume for the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival. The elaborate design has been carefully planned and constructed using a wealth of materials. The carnival procession set off from Potternewton Park at 2pm after a launch by the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Eric Atkinson. The costumed participants, accompanied by steel bands, then wended their way along Harehills Lane, Roundhay Road, Barrack Road, Chapeltown Road and Harehills Avenue before arriving back at the park for the judging of individuals, troupes and bands. The winners of the troupe with best costume design were children dressed as African Butterflies. It is believed that the young girl pictured is one these.
[23]Leeds West Indian Carnival, young girls in costume (Chapeltown)
Leeds West Indian Carnival, young girls in costume25th August 1980. Image shows a group of young girls as they stand chatting in Potternewton Park on August Bank Holiday Monday, 1980, the day of the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival procession. They are all wearing similar costumes with light coloured blouses and gathered skirts. Their hair is intricately braided and beaded. The procession, with floats, bands and troupes of costumed dancers, set off from Potternewton Park at 2.00pm.
[24]Nelson Mandela arrives at the Civic Hall (City Centre)
Nelson Mandela arrives at the Civic Hall30th April 2001. View of Nelson Mandela as he arrives at the Civic Hall on an official visit to Leeds. Greeting the former South African President are, from left to right, the Lady Mayoress of Leeds, Susan Pitter, who for many years helped to organise the Leeds West Indian Carnival, the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Bernard Atha, and the Leader of Leeds City Council, Councillor Brian Walker.
[25]Nelson Mandela arrives at the Civic Hall (City Centre)
Nelson Mandela arrives at the Civic Hall30th April 2001. View of Nelson Mandela, the former South African President, as he arrives at the Civic Hall on an official visit to Leeds. He is being greeted by the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Bernard Atha. To the left is the Lady Mayoress, Susan Pitter, who for many years has been closely involved with the organisation of Leeds West Indian Carnival. On the right is the Leader of Leeds City Council, Councillor Brian Walker.
[26]Nelson Mandela in the Civic Hall (City Centre)
Nelson Mandela in the Civic Hall30th April 2001. Image taken in the Civic Hall, shows a young girl being presented to the former President of South Africa, Nelson Mandela. He was in Leeds to be made an Honorary Freeman of the City of Leeds. In the centre is the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Bernard Atha and on the far left, the Lady Mayoress, Susan Pitter, who had helped to organise the Leeds West Indian Carnival for many years. Far right is the Leader of Leeds City Council, Councillor Brian Walker.
[27]Potternewton Park, Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Potternewton Park, Leeds West Indian Carnival25th August 1980. A photographer prepares to take pictures of the participants of the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival in Potternewton Park. Also seen, behind the barriers, are some of the onlookers who are gathered to enjoy the specatular costumes, music and dancing as the carnival procession gets ready to set off. It was to leave the park at 2 pm and follow a route along Harehills Lane, Roundhay Road, Barrack Road, Chapeltown Road and Harehills Avenue before returning to the park for the judging.
[28]Potternewton Park, West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown) (1 comment)
Potternewton Park, West Indian CarnivalAugust 1997 View of some of the colourfully dressed participants at the West Indian carnival at Potternewton Park, talking to the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Linda Middleton. This colourful spectacle of costumes, music and dance of Caribbean origin is the oldest West Indian carnival in the country, having taken place at the August Bank Holiday every year since 1967, and it is second only to Notting Hill in size.
[29]Pottternewton Park, little girls in costume (Chapeltown)
Pottternewton Park, little girls in costume25th August 1980. These little girls in their spangled carnival costumes are photographed in Potternewton Park. Something has caught the eye of the girl on the left and she is drawing it to the attention of the smaller child beside her. As the participants gathered for the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival procession there would have been plenty of exciting sights and sounds with spectacular costumes and lively music from the steel bands. These young girls are wearing headdresses adorned with pairs of little birds and simple dresses decorated with rows of fringing.
[30]Queen of the Universe in Potternewton Park (Chapeltown)
Queen of the Universe in Potternewton Park25th August 1980. Potternewton Park plays host to the Queen of the Universe in this image. She is 21 year-old Sharon Hall who is taking part in the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival held on Bank Holiday Monday, 25th August 1980. She is dressed in a spangled outfit and surrounded by an elaborately constructed work of art, mounted on a float, and representing a galaxy of stars and the moon. Much time, effort and creativity has gone into designing and making these fantastical costumes in the weeks leading up to the carnival. The spectacular event has been a firm fixture in Leeds' diary for many years and this year (2013) saw the 46th Leeds West Indian Carnival take place.
[31]Young girl in carnival costume, Potternewton Park (Chapeltown)
Young girl in carnival costume, Potternewton Park25th August 1980. A young girl has help adjusting her costume as she gets ready for the 13th Leeds West Indian Carnival Procession in Potternewton Park. She wears a leotard in shiny fabric with a polka dot pattern and behind her are huge wing-like structures decorated with butterflies. She may be one of the group of young people respresenting African Butterflies who were winners of the best costume design for troupes in the 1980 carnival.