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Results Found (66), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect (alf mattison )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]Albion Street, Denby and Spinks (City Centre) (8 comments)
Albion Street, Denby and SpinksUndated. View of Albion Street from early part of the 20th century, showing, in the centre, no. 27 - 33, Denby & Spinks Carpet & Furniture Stone. This building was formerly the Albion Street Music Hall, dating from 1792-3; the lower part was occupied by the Albion Carpet Warehouse from 1850 and the rest sold on 9th February 1870; it became Denby & Spinks 1876. The site is now part of the Leeds Shopping Plaza. On the right of the picture is no. 35-37, Charles William Lillie, ironmonger, with Albion Walk in between this and Denby & Spinks. In the background on the left is L.E. Knight & Co, wholesale jeweller, at no. 13. a streetlamp can be seen.
[2]Alderman Brook's House (Hunslet) (17 comments)
Alderman BrookUndated. Alderman Brook's house, Hunslet Lane. Large brick house now demolished. "A guide published in 1808 described Hunslet as 'a little more than a mile from Leeds'. Between the two places was a country lane - Hunslet Lane to Leeds people, and Leeds Lane to Hunslet people - and bordering it were fine residences. Of the few remaining, that know as Alderman Brook's house, is one of the most striking. It is notable for the geat number of windows, and also for the length of the building" (Mattison A and Meakin W 1908, The Romance of Old Leeds). Photograph Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[3]Assembly Rooms, Assembly Street (City Centre)
Assembly Rooms, Assembly Streetc.1910. In Georgian Leeds, the nobility and gentry of the city required a centre for social engagements. The Assembly Rooms which were built over the north wing of the Third White Cloth Hall in 1777, provided the perfect venue with a highly decorative ballroom and a suite of supper rooms and card rooms. By the mid 1800s the Assembly Rooms had been converted to a Working Mens Club before becoming William Towler's Globe Foundry Warehouse as shown in this view. In the 1920s Hirst's Tobacco changed the name of the building to Waterloo House. The building has now, however been restored to its original function, as a venue for entertainment including the Cafe Rouge, the entrance to which can be seen towards the right with a roof gable.
[4]Beeston Hall (Beeston) (1 comment)
Beeston HallUndated. Beeston Hall. Demolished 1936. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[5]Briggate, Bow Windowed Shop (City Centre)
Briggate, Bow Windowed Shop1890. The last bow windowed shop in Briggate (no 51). Premises of William Green and Sons, late Buck and Jackson. Demolished 1922. The passage on the right leads to the Turk's Head Tavern (Whitelocks) established 1715. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[6]Burmantofts Hall (Burmantofts)
Burmantofts Hallc1906. Burmantofts Hall, Old Hall Street. Run down housing. Sign above one door says Rouse, bookmaker. Stone wall in front of houses. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[7]Buslingthorpe (City Centre) (1 comment)
Buslingthorpec1910. Buslingthorpe from the quarries. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[8]Carr Hall, Hunslet Moor Side (Hunslet)
Carr Hall, Hunslet Moor Sidec1910. Large red brick house with stone mullions and leaded windows. Photo by Alf Mattison.
[9]City Square (City Centre)
City Squarec1908. Boar Lane and City Square. Domed building on the right is the London City and Midland Bank formerly Yorkshire Banking Company. Photo by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[10]City Square, National Service Hut (City Centre)
City Square, National Service Hut1939. Wartime view of City Square from late 1939 showing the National Service Hut erected as a recruitment office for the armed services. A large poster shows a lion underneath the words "Wake Up Citizens of Leeds". The statue of the Black Prince looms high above while the Queens Hotel (left) and the Majestic Cinema and General Post Office (right) can be seen in the background.
[11]Cloth Hall Hotel (City Centre) (2 comments)
Cloth Hall HotelUndated. North east side of Infirmary Street. Site now occupied by no.9 Bond Court. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[12]Entrance to Pleasaunce, Knostrop Old Hall (Knostrop) (2 comments)
Entrance to Pleasaunce, Knostrop Old Hallc1910. Residence of Captain Adam Baynes (1620-1670) MP for Leeds in the Commmonwealth. Residence of the artist Atkinson Grimshaw in the 1870s. Demolished in 1960. A Pleasaunce or Pleasance was an area attached to a house or estate used for pleasure or recreation. Photo by Alf Mattison
[13]Golden Cock Inn (City Centre) (15 comments)
Golden Cock Innc1901. North east side of Kirkgate (nos. 13 and 14) and entrance to Bewley Yard. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[14]Guildford Street (City Centre) (1 comment)
Guildford Streetc1906. Burley Bar, the south-west corner of Albion Street and Guildford Street. A photograph by Alf Mattison. There are shops and advertising hoardings and a postman delivering letters. The 'Yorkshire Evening Post' noted in 1922, 'It was to the top of Merry Boys Hill that the westward limit of the town proper extended, the boundary beng marked by Burley Bar. This fact is proclaimed to this day in the existence of the boundary stone in the wall of one of the old fashioned shops opposite the Commercial Hotel, on which can still be descried the faint lettering 'Burley Bar'. The five 'one decker' shops are probably 200 years of age, and within Butts Court are several bits of property no less ancient.' The tobacconist's was owned by George Eastwood, to the right was Ernest Swaine, watchmaker, then the beerhouse of Walter Prestage Pilling, rather oddly described in the directory as a beer retailer and confectioner, then James Easby's fruit shop. The whole site was obtained for £42,500 by the Leeds and Holbeck Building Society in 1924, for the building of its new headquarters.
[15]Hunslet Lane (Hunslet) (5 comments)
Hunslet Lanec1910. Hunslet Lane, west side and corner of Coal Staith Road showing Scarbro' castle at 7, 72 Hunslet Lane. Adverts for Reckitt's Blue and Nestles milk on the side of the building. Demolished June 1944. Photograph by Alf Mattison.
[16]Hustorpe Hall Meadow Lane (Hunslet)
Hustorpe Hall Meadow LaneUndated. Hustorpe Hall,New Lane off Meadow Lane, now demolished. Photo by Alf Mattison.
[17]Ingram's House, Hunslet Road (Hunslet) (1 comment)
Ingramc1910. Large brick built house on Hunslet Road with iron railings to the front. Sign for William Green, funeral furnishers on the right. Photo by Alf Mattison.
[18]Kirkgate (City Centre) (2 comments)
Kirkgate1909. Kirkgate south west side, adjoining the parish church (High Court Lane to railway viaduct). Demolished 1933-4 to widen The Calls. Photograph by Alf Mattison.
[19]Kirkgate, former Old Crown Inn (City Centre) (3 comments)
Kirkgate, former Old Crown Innc1907. View shows the south side of Kirkgate, from Old Crown Yard to Wharf Street, with the former old Crown Inn, used as shop premises for Mr Smith, medical botanist, and Tolson's noted tripe shop. A notice above the doors says that the property was used by the Ancient Order of Foresters (Friendly Society) and was the birthplace of "Forestry", with "Court No. 1 established here in 1790". The Ancient Order of Foresters was actually founded in Rochdale in 1834, but its origins were in a much earlier society, The Royal Foresters, formed in the 18th century, who would have been the ones who met in this building in 1790. The Property was demolished in 1935. Photograph by Alf Mattison.
[20]Kirkgate, The Barstow Mansion (City Centre)
Kirkgate, The Barstow Mansionc1906. The Barstow Mansion, Kirkgate, opposite west entrance to parish church. Shops include Goulden provisions, a poultry shop and Noble's Stores. Advertising hoardings for Colman's Starch and Velma chocolate. Now demolished. Photograph Alf Mattison.
[21]Kirkstall Abbey, The West Door (Kirkstall)
Kirkstall Abbey, The West DoorUndated. Image shows the ornate west entrance to the nave. Construction of Kirstall Abbey began in the 12th century with the work being paid for by Henry de Lacy the Baron of Pontefract.
[22]Kirkstall Abbey, Winter (Kirkstall)
Kirkstall Abbey, WinterUndated Image shows a winter view of Kirkstall Abbey across the top of the snow covered weir.
[23]Knostrop Old Hall (Knostrop) (3 comments)
Knostrop Old HallUndated. c.1908. Residence of Captain Adam Baynes, member for Leeds in the Commonwealth Parliament. The hall stands in large gardens and at one time there was a beautiful pleasance. This was entered through a gateway which had a statue at either side (Mattison A and Meakin W 1908 The Romance of Old Leeds). The photograph shows a stone built house viewed from the front. Five children stand near arched doorway. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[24]Lambert's Yard (City Centre) (12 comments)
LambertUndated. Lambert's Yard, Lower Briggate. Derelict yard, buildings have broken windows. "The old house depicted in our illustration is to be seen in what is known as Lambert's yard, just above the railway bridge in Lower Briggate, on the left hand side proceeding from Boar Lane. It is now tenantless and the plaster is falling from the exterior walls, but despite its present forlorn appearance, it stands out distinctively from the ugly modern buildings which surround it. From Elizabethan times onwards for a century or more, Lower Briggate, like Boar Lane, was a favourite residential street of opulent merchants, who often had their handloom weaving carried on in the rear portion of their houses. Cheek by jowl with these little mansions were a few shops, and several of the real old English taverns" (Mattison A and Meakin W 1908 The Romance of Old Leeds p9) Photo by Alf Mattison.
[25]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899. Image taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary areas. The man in a bowler hat at the top of the stairs on the left appears to be making an inspection of the street. In the centre of the street cobbles slope downwards towards a gutter and a single drain while overhead clothes hang out on lines stretched across the street. Window shutters are steaked against the buildings on the left while behind, chairs are set out by entryways. People in period dress are stood by the buildings.
[26]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899. Image taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary areas. Two men and a young boy in period dress stand in a yard outside what appears to be a shared outside toilet block overlooked by factory and warehouse buildings. Photograph taken as part of an official enquiry into insanitary areas in Leeds. The men in bowler hats appear to be carrying out an inspection.
[27]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899 Image taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary Areas. The men in bowler hats on the stairs are inspectors. The image shows a yard full of debris where people work in cramped conditions. On the left a woman wearing an apron kneels in the dirt to work.
[28]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown) (3 comments)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899 Taken by Alfred E Mattison during 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary Areas. The man in the bowler hat is an inspector. Image shows an alleyway with buildings on either side. People are stood in the doorways of the buildings while on the left children are lined up against the wall, all in period dress.
[29]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899. Image taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary Areas. The man in bowler hats an period dress are making and inspection of the yard. Two doors lead off the yard, large windows display shutters and lines for clothes are stretched across the yard.
[30]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899 Taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into insanitary areas in Leeds. The two men in bowler hats are inspectors. Image shows a yard with what appears to be a stable on the left and a residence on the right. A small girl in period dress sits on the edge of an empty horsedrawn cart on the right.
[31]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899 Image taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary areas. Image shows a street with workshops on the left. The road is littered with debris while in the foreground and distance large horsedrawn carts stand empty. Clothes hang on a line stretched across the street while a man and children are visible in period dress. The two men in bowler hats are inspectors.
[32]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown) (1 comment)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899 Taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary Areas. The man in the bowler hat is an inspector. Image shows a yard surrounded on two sides by tall buildings. A man in period dress sits smoking a pipe on the left of the inspector. On the far right is a shared outside toilet block. Washing lines are stretched across the yard.
[33]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899 Image taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary areas. The men in bowler hats and period dress appear to be making an inspection of the yard. A derelict warehouse overlooks the yard where the four inspectors stand behind two horse drawn carts surrounded by building debris and masonary on either side.
[34]Leeds Insanitary Areas (Unknown) (3 comments)
Leeds Insanitary Areas1899 Taken by Alfred E Mattison during the 1899 official enquiry into Leeds Insanitary areas. The men in bowler hats on the left are inspectors. The image shows a yard with buildings on the left and right and a shared outside toilet block at the back, all overlooked by a large warehouse building behind. The yard is full of people including women and children in period dress.
[35]Lower Briggate (City Centre) (2 comments)
Lower BriggateUndated. View looking north from junction with Call Lane. Commercial Hotel on the left, Old George Hotel on the right. North Eastern Railway Viaduct built 1866-69 to take the line to the new City Station. Open top tram number 149 to Hunslet on the left. Robert Steel, tobacconist on the corner. Photograph by Alf Mattison.
[36]Lower Briggate (City Centre) (1 comment)
Lower Briggate1908. Lower Briggate eastside, showing nos. 159 - 162, Royal Buildings and Royal Hotel. Royal Hotel established 1692. Cauldwell, paperhanger on left, Brooks, on right. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[37]Lowerhead Row (City Centre)
Lowerhead Row1907. Lowerhead Row, south side, junction with Vicar Lane. Shops include Victoria Furnishing Co Ltd and the Malt Shovel Inn. A policeman in a cape stands on the corner. Photograph by Alf Mattison.
[38]Moot Hall, Briggate, Leeds 1816 (City Centre) (3 comments)
Moot Hall, Briggate, Leeds 18161816. Moot Hall built about 1618. Rebuilt in 1710. Demolished in 1826 and a corn exchange built at the top of Briggate. The white marble statue of Queen Anne by Andrew Carpenter, gift of Alderman Milner, was placed in front of Moot Hall 1713, and removed to top of Briggate in 1828 before going to the City Art Gallery. Moot Hall was the scene of many pageants notably when Charles 1 made the town into a Royal Borough. The heads of three executed men in 1664 were also said to have been placed on spikes at Moothall End (Mattison M and Meakin W, 1908, The Romance of Old Leeds, p4). Artist Thomas Taylor. Engraver Charles Heath. Also reproduced by Alf Mattison from the engraving.
[39]Old George Hotel, Lower Briggate (City Centre) (3 comments)
Old George Hotel, Lower BriggateUndated, Image shows the old George Hotel on Lower Briggate. First owned by the Knights Templar in the 13th century, the building displays Templar crosses on its front. Opened as the hotel 'Ye Bush' in the 17th century it became 'The George' in 1714 and 'The Old George' in 1815 when 'The George and Dragon' opened nearby. Sometimes called Simpson Hotel, Charlotte Bronte once stayed here and described the interior in her novel Jane Eyre. The hotel closed on 30th April 1919 after the license lapsed and the building was demolished soon after. On the left a sign advertises the Bridge Garage for reliable repairs while on the right a ginnel leads to George Yard and the premises of W. Simpson Registered Plumber Sanitary and Hot Water Engineer.
[40]Old House at the corner of South Brook Street and Hunslet Lane (Hunslet) (1 comment)
Old House at the corner of South Brook Street and Hunslet Lane1910. House formerly the residence of Alderman Brook, merchant. He was Mayor of Leeds in 1736. Photograph by Alf Mattison. House demolished 1932.
[41]Old Houses at Upper Wortley Road (Wortley) (3 comments)
Old Houses at Upper Wortley Roadc1910. Stonebuilt houses with vegetable gardens in front. Premises of Diggle and Thackray, Joiners and undertakers on the left. Photo by Alf Mattison.
[42]Old Workhouse (City Centre)
Old Workhouse1936. The old workhouse, Lady Lane, Leeds. Building appears derelict, some windows boarded up, some broken. Rubble at front of building. Demolished August-September 1936. Photograph by Alf Mattison June 1936. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[43]Osmondthorpe Old Hall, Osmondthorpe Lane (Osmondthorpe) (2 comments)
Osmondthorpe Old Hall, Osmondthorpe Lanec1910. View of a stone built house with shutters on the ground floor window. It was known as Osmondthorpe Old Hall. An earlier hall had been demolished and was rebuilt in 1814. Several families have been associated with Osmondthorpe Old Hall over the centuries including the Ibbetsons and the Skeltons. Osmondthorpe Old Hall, demolished in the 1930s, was situated on the east side of Osmondthorpe Lane and is sometimes confused with the mansion called 'Osmondthorpe Hall' which dated from the 1720s and stood off the west side. In 1886 part of the grounds were sold to the council by John Robinson, the last owner of Osmondthorpe Hall. The land was used to create East End Park. Osmondthorpe Hall was destroyed when it caught fire in 1924. Photo by Alf Mattison.
[44]Osmondthorpe Old Hall, Osmondthorpe Lane (Osmondthorpe)
Osmondthorpe Old Hall, Osmondthorpe LaneUndated. View of Osmondthorpe Hall located off York Road on the east side of Osmondthorpe Lane in a photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer, Alfred Mattison, was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in September 1944. Osmondthorpe Old Hall was demolished and then rebuilt in 1814. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth cnturies it was occupied by farmers before being demolished in the 1930s. The property is not to be confused with the 18th century mansion, Osmondthorpe Hall, which stood off the west side of Osmondthorpe Lane and was destroyed by fire in 1924. Fifty acres of the grounds of Osmondthorpe Hall were sold to the council in 1886 to provide a site for East End Park.
[45]Pack Horse Inn (City Centre) (6 comments)
Pack Horse Innc1908. Pack Horse Inn, west side of Briggate. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[46]Red House, Hunslet (Hunslet)
Red House, HunsletUndated. Brick terraced houses with cobbled yard in front. Advert for Tivoli on side of one building. Cat in yard. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[47]Red House, Low Road (Hunslet)
Red House, Low Road1907. Residence of the Kitchingman family, partly used as a lodging house. Sign above door for 'Working Men's Home'. Photograph by Alf Mattison. (contemporary with Red Hall, King Charles Croft and now demolished). The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[48]Reservoir Street (Woodhouse)
Reservoir Streetc1910. Reservoir Street, a bit of old Woodhouse. Image shows stone cottage. Photograph by Alf Mattison.
[49]Rockley Hall Yard (City Centre)
Rockley Hall YardUndated. Timber frame buildings, Rockley Hall Yard, The Headrow. Photograph by Alf Mattison.
[50]Roundhay Park, Boathouse (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, BoathouseUndated, This view of Roundhay Park shows the end of the boathouse on the right, boats for hire and a section of Waterloo Lake.