leodis logo

Leeds City Council

Open archives compliant site

Supported by BIG Lottery Fund

Enrich UK Lottery Fund

Results Found (66), Result Page (2 of 2)
Search Aspect (alf mattison )
Location - Leeds & District

[51]Scott Hall Windmill, off Buslingthorpe Lane (Potternewton) (3 comments)
Scott Hall Windmill, off Buslingthorpe LaneUndated. Remains of Scott Hall Windmill, situated off Buslingthorpe Lane near the bottom of Scott Hall Road, at a spot which is now just down from the south west corner of Prince Philip Playing Fields. This was one of a pair built in the 18th century along with Sugarwell Hill Windmill off Potternewton Mount. This windmill was built in 1776 and demolished in the 1938 but the other was converted into a dwelling and is known as the Round House. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[52]St James Church (City Centre) (3 comments)
St James ChurchUndated. Church on New York Street. Originally built for the Countess of Huntingdon's connection. Closed 1950. Now demolished. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[53]St Matthew's Church (Chapel Allerton)
St Matthew1911. The old church in Chapel Allerton. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[54]Temple Newsam House, Great Porch (Temple Newsam)
Temple Newsam House, Great PorchUndated, The Great Porch of Temple Newsam House is the entrance to the South Wing. Completed in the mid 17th century it provides a highly decorative focal point for the front of the house. Above the doorway are the arms of Edward Second Viscount Irwin (d.1688) and a stone bust of Charles II.
[55]Temple Newsam House, Inscription (Temple Newsam)
Temple Newsam House, Inscription1928 East view of Temple Newsam House. The first Temple Newsam House was built in the early 1500s by Thomas Lord Darcy. Sir Arthur Ingram demolished three sides of this original Tudor buildings leaving the west wing which survives as the central block of the present house. Ingram bought the house in 1622, adding the North and South wings and the inscription reads, 'All Glory and Praise be Given to God, the Father the Son and Holy Ghost on High, Peace on Earth Good Will Towards all Men, Honour and True Allegiance to our Gracious King, Loving Affection Amongst his Subjects, Health and Plenty be Within This House'.
[56]Temple Newsam House, North Wing (Temple Newsam)
Temple Newsam House, North WingUndated, View shows the ivy-clad walls of the North Wing of Temple Newsam House, seen from the south east. This part of the house was built in the 1620s by Sir Arthur Ingram of red brick with stone decorations. Ingram added the prayer around the roof top in 1628 which was recited at daily worship in the chapel.
[57]Temple Newsam House, South Wing (Temple Newsam)
Temple Newsam House, South WingUndated This view of the South Wing of Temple Newsam House was taken by the Leeds historian Alf Mattison. This wing was originally built by Sir Arthur Ingram who bought the estate in 1622. It was, however, later rebuilt by the widow of Charles Ninth Viscount Irwin (1727 - 1778) and bears the inscription 'This South Wing was rebuilt by Frances Shepheard Viscountess Irwin in the year 1796'.
[58]Temple Newsam Park (Temple Newsam)
Temple Newsam ParkUndated, A woodland scene in the park at Temple Newsam.
[59]The Old Dusty Miller Inn (City Centre)
The Old Dusty Miller Inn1904. Situated at no 9 Swinegate, south side 1904. Demolished in 1904. Site later occupied by the offices of the City Tramways. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[60]The Old White Chapel (Hunslet)
The Old White ChapelUndated. The Old White Chapel, Hunslet Lane. Partly destroyed by fire in 1928. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[61]Town Street (Armley) (1 comment)
Town Streetc1890. No 53 Town Street, now demolished. Building appears derelict and there is a faded sign for Joddy, Cooper and Co licenced brokers on the wall. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[62]Upper part of Briggate (City Centre)
Upper part of Briggate Undated. Formerly called Cross Parish. Photographed from the original picture by J Grieg by Alf Mattison 1851. The Corn Exchange at the top of Briggate, demolished in 1869 to make New Briggate.
[63]Water Hall, Water Lane (Holbeck) (3 comments)
Water Hall, Water LaneUndated. View looks from Water Lane onto Water Hall. This building had once been a single property later divided into separate dwellings and business premises. According to a Leeds Mercury report of 1899 the house had been owned by the Quaker family, Kay. James Kay built Water Hall Mills which was said at that time to be the oldest mill property in Leeds. He also had a shop in Lowerhead Row selling flax and line. Water Hall itself was described as a very old gentleman's residence, marked on an old corporation map of 1781. The late son of James Kay, Joshua Kay, (listed in the 1851 Leeds Directory) who resided at Water Hall was mentioned in the Leeds Mercury in 1891 in an article about the Quaker burial ground between Water Lane and Great Wilson Street. He was remembered fondly as Jossy Kay, a "kind, corpulent, honest old bachelor who was so indiscreetly and indescriminately charitable that his house was beset with beggars of every description who knew his weakness and dogged his footsteps at every turn". This photograph, taken by Alf Mattison and dating from the early 1900s, shows the premises of Arthur Shevill, blue and grey slater and cab proprietor, Dr James Ewing, physician and William Cail, oil importer. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944. On 17th February 1923 Water Hall was reported in the Yorkshire Evening Post as being connected to 'a house of entertainment' called Pasture Spring, a kind of tea garden.
[64]Waterfall, Roundhay Park (Roundhay) (3 comments)
Waterfall, Roundhay ParkUndated. View of the artificially constructed waterfall in Roundhay Park designed by Nicholson in the early part of the nineteeth century. It consisted of 60 feet of rock face forming a series of cascades. This is the most impressive of the waterfalls in the park and is marked by the huge raised stone boulder at its head.
[65]Woodhouse Hill Road (Hunslet) (2 comments)
Woodhouse Hill RoadUndated. 65, 67, 69 Woodhouse Hill Road, Hunlet. Houses surrounded by a stone wall and a fence. There is a woman and a child in the doorway of no 65. Demolished 1934. Photograph by Alf Mattison. The photographer Alfred Mattison was born in Hunslet in 1868. His passion for local history led to lecturing, photography and writing. In 1908 he wrote "The Romance of Old Leeds" based on his articles and photos for the Yorkshire Daily Observer. He died following a street accident in Leeds in Sept 1944.
[66]Woodhouse Hill Road (Hunslet) (1 comment)
Woodhouse Hill RoadUndated. Old cottages with stone wall in front. Demolished. Photograph Alf Mattison.