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Results Found (272), Result Page (3 of 6)
Search Aspect (cricket )
Location - Leeds & District

[101]Grange Park Cricket Pavilion, Wetherby Cricket Club (Wetherby)
Grange Park Cricket Pavilion, Wetherby Cricket ClubUndated View of Grange Park Cricket Pavilion, home of Wetherby Cricket Club prior to ceremoniously being burnt down in 1986 to make way for the new western By-pass of the A.1.
[102]Grimsby Street, nos.1-7 (Burmantofts)
Grimsby Street, nos.1-7Undated Green Road can be seen on the left edge, then number 1 Grimsby Street. Moving right are 3, 5 and 7, which is next to the yard. A wicket has been marked on the wall of the yard, to be used in a game of cricket. Photo dating from the mid 1950s, before the Newtown/Burmantofts area was redeveloped.
[103]Grimsby Street, nos.9-19 (Burmantofts) (2 comments)
Grimsby Street, nos.9-19Undated View of Grimsby Street, looking towards the wall which had separated the street from Ireton Place (demolished). On the left is a yard for outside toilets, a cricket wicket has been marked on the wall. Number 9 has a push chair outside, then moving right, the numbers follow in ascending order to 19 at the end of the street. Photo taken in the mid 1950s, prior to clearance of the Newtown/Burmantofts area.
[104]Guiseley Primitive Methodist Cricket Club (Guiseley)
Guiseley Primitive Methodist Cricket Club1914. Image shows members of Guiseley Primitive Methodist Cricket Club, winners of the First and Second Divisions of the Otley and District League, season 1914. The Primitive Methodist Church was situated in Otley Road on the present site of Morrisons supermarket which was built in the 1980s.
[105]Harrogate Road, view from the car park of Somerfields Supermarket (Chapel Allerton) (1 comment)
Harrogate Road, view from the car park of Somerfields Supermarket1st January 2006. View of business properties in Harrogate Road from the car park of Somerfild's Supermarket. On the left is the former Mexborough Arms, now The Three Hulats. Originally it was the Bowling Green Inn and stands on what was once the terminus of the Harrogate turnpike (The Bowling Green was the site of the supermarket car park). The Bowling Green Inn was said to have hosted the first cricket match in Yorkshire in 1757. The parade of shops on the right, number, from left, 64 to 52 Harrogate Road. They include the Little Dragon Takeaway at number 56. Photograph courtesy of James William Bell.
[106]Havelock Street, Green Lane (Wortley) (1 comment)
Havelock Street, Green Lane3rd June 1959 View looks from Green Lane onto the odd numbered end of Havelock Street. Numbers run from the left in ascending order to number 65 towards the right. a poster advertising a three day cricket match between Yorkshire and Northamptonshire at Headingley is visible here. On the right is a narrow former shop building at number 20a Green Lane.
[107]Headingley Cricket Ground (Headingley)
Headingley Cricket GroundUndated. Aerial view. Opened 27th May 1890, Yorkshire County Cricket Club played their first match in June 1891. The first County Championship match played here in August 1891 and the first Test Match against Australia in 1899. This view looks towards Cardigan Road, Kirkstall Lane running bottom left.
[108]Headingley Cricket Ground (Headingley)
Headingley Cricket Ground2nd August 1967 View of Headingley Cricket Ground taken from the north enclosure. At the far side, from left to right, can be seen the Yorkshire County Cricket Club Offices and dressing rooms the Bowling Green stand, the Leeds Pavilion and Pavilion stand and the main stand
[109]Headingley Cricket Ground (Headingley) (2 comments)
Headingley Cricket GroundUndated. Home of Yorkshire County Cricket Club and world famous Test Match venue. View of a large audience in the pavillion and terraces surrounding the cricket pitch. None of the play can be seen. In November 1913, two suffragettes were arrested for attempted arson at Headingley Stadium, during the week of prime minister Herbert Asquith's visit. The 'Headingley Two', a dark haired woman of about twenty-five and her accomplice a 'girlish figure in green cap and sports jacket' appeared in court. Evidence used against them included postcards stating 'NO VOTE, NO SPORT, NO PEACE-FIRE, DESTRUCTION, DEVASTATION' and one addressed to Asquith himself: 'We are burning for votes for women". The two ladies also made complaints against several Armley Goal warders for using violence to obtain finger prints. Information taken from Leonora Cohen press cutting book at Abbey House Museum.
[110]Headingley Cricket Ground, Carnegie Pavilion (Headingley)
Headingley Cricket Ground, Carnegie Pavilion7th March 2011. View from Headingley Cricket Ground of the Carnegie Pavilion, Yorkshire County Cricket Club's new state-of-the-art facilities built in partnership with Leeds Metropolitan University and opened in July 2010. The cricket ground was built on land purchased by the Leeds Football, Cricket and Athletic Club Ltd. from the Cardigan estate and hosted its first match in 1890. Yorkshire County Cricket Club first played here in June 1891 and the ground was soon to become their main venue, but it was not until 31st December 2005 that they purchased the ground themselves. It is now part of the Headingley Carnegie Stadium along with the adjacent rugby ground and is jointly managed by Yorkshire CCC and Leeds Rugby.
[111]Headingley Cricket Ground, Carnegie Pavilion, artist's impression (Headingley)
Headingley Cricket Ground, Carnegie Pavilion, artistc2009. This artist's impression of the new Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground was fixed to construction hoardings in Kirkstall Lane during the build. The pavilion, a joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University, was opened on 21st July 2010 and a similar view of the completed building can be seen at 2011616_172250. Designed by Will Alsop, the 4,000 square metre project combines new lecture theatres and teaching space for the University's school of tourism, hospitality and events management with a state-of-the-art cricket pavilion featuring a media centre, hospitality suites, players' changing and treatment rooms, executive boxes and spectator seating.
[112]Headingley Cricket Ground, groundsman (Headingley)
Headingley Cricket Ground, groundsman27th June 1958 Cricket pitch at Headingley being prepared by groundsman Arthur Waite for the forthcoming Test match against New Zealand. England won the test by an innings and 71 runs.
[113]Headingley Cricket Ground, Kirkstall Lane (Headingley)
Headingley Cricket Ground, Kirkstall LaneUndated, A view of the cricket ground and pavilion in the early 1900s. The 22 acre site originally belonged to the Cardigan Estate and was purchased by the Leeds Football, Cricket and Athletic Company Ltd chaired by Lord Hawke. The first match was held on May 27th, 1890 between Leeds CC and Scarborough and the pavilion was built in 1889.
[114]Headingley Cricket Ground, match in progress, waterclour painting by Pete Lapish (Headingley) (1 comment)
Headingley Cricket Ground, match in progress, waterclour painting by Pete Lapishc1995. View of a match in progress at Headingley Cricket Ground in this watercolour painting by Yorkshire artist, Pete Lapish. It is painted using a photograph taken by the artist for reference. The old stand dominates the background. More of Pete Lapish's images can be seen on his website www.petelapish.art
[115]Headingley, aerial view (Headingley)
Headingley, aerial viewUndated Aerial view looking north along Otley Road. Headingley Cricket Ground is visible to the left, with Leeds Rugby League Football Ground adjacent to the south.
[116]Headingley, aerial view (Headingley)
Headingley, aerial view16th July 1937. Aerial view of Headingley showing Otley Road/Headingley Lane running across from left to right in the top half; the road changes name by St. Michael's Church just to the left of centre. Headingley Cricket Ground is seen in the bottom left corner with North Lane to its left, St. Michael's Lane to its right and Cardigan Road above. Marked on in red is a proposed by-pass that was never built.
[117]High Street, cricket match in progress (Yeadon)
High Street, cricket match in progress1892 View of a Monday cricket match in progress at Yeadon Cricket Ground during Yeadon Feast. Feast week was the third week in August when the local mills closed,initially for 3 days, but later for a week. The Cricket Ground is still at the rear of the White Swan Public House in the High Street. In the background Moorfield Mills are visible with Yeadon Moor and Bayton Lane behind (towards the right) Moorfield Mills was built in 1877 and the owner was William Murgatroyd ('Billy Murg'). The woollen industry in Yeadon employed a large percentage of the town's population.
[118]High Street, Yeadon Cricket Club Ground and Pavilion. (Yeadon)
High Street, Yeadon Cricket Club Ground and Pavilion. Undated View of the cricket ground and pavilion situated at the rear of the White Swan Public House in the High Street. Yeadon Cricket Club was founded in 1859 and it played its first season in Nunroyd fields. The club moved to the White Swan location in 1865. The pavilion was built in 1887 and spectators were also able to observe the matches from the 'long room' of the White Swan where they could enjoy a pint of beer. Yeadon Cricket Club has produced many fine cricketers some of whom played for Yorkshire.
[119]Highbury Cricket Ground, Charity Match in Progress (Meanwood) (5 comments)
Highbury Cricket Ground, Charity Match in ProgressUndated. A wartime charity cricket match is in progress at the 1928 Highbury Cricket Ground off Hollin Drive. Just glimpsed through the trees, right of centre is Ivy Cottage, across Meanwood Beck, at number 95 Green Road. It dates from 1805 and was built by the Rinder family. It was once owned by Leeds artist, Alfred Elsworth.
[120]Highgate Street (Hunslet) (1 comment)
Highgate Street16th July 1948. The garden of number 7 Highgate Street. It is overgrown and has an old bath in it. Two sheds with corrugated iron roofs are behind, with a cricket pitch beyond.
[121]Highgate Street, rear of, from Hunslet Cricket Ground (Hunslet) (1 comment)
Highgate Street, rear of, from Hunslet Cricket GroundUndated. View shows the rear of Highgate Street, off Low Road, taken from behind the pavilion of the Hunslet Cricket Ground. The building in the centre, with its own balcony and walled garden area, was Salmon's Barbers shop. It is bricked up here at the back, probably shortly before demolition.
[122]Horsforth Hall Park, Bowling Green (Horsforth)
Horsforth Hall Park, Bowling GreenUndated. Plenty of activity is taking place on and around the Bowling Green of Horsforth Hall Park. The Putting Green is to the right of it. This photograph was taken prior to the construction of the pavilion and public toilets which were built in the 1960s. The shelter towards the left of the image was removed to facilitate the new building. The view looks south east taking in the bandstand and the trees at the edge of the park, parrallel with Fink Hill. The cricket ground is towards the right.
[123]Horsforth Hall Park, View of the Band Stand (Horsforth)
Horsforth Hall Park, View of the Band StandUndated. View of the bandstand in Horsforth Park looking West from the side of the park which runs parallel with Fink Hill. There is a shelter to the right near to the band of trees running alongside Hall Lane. On the left, the perimeter of the cricket ground is visible and , in the distance, houses in Fraser Avenue can be just seen. Wrought iron and wooden seating has been spaced at intervals along the paths that criss cross the park.
[124]Horsforth Station, Tinshill Lane (Horsforth) (2 comments)
Horsforth Station, Tinshill Lane1910 View across Horsforth Station and Tinshill Lane looking from Horsforth towards Cookridge. Field on the left of the road was used by the Bachelor Lane New Connexion Cricket Team, it was known as 'High Level'. The Fox and Hounds public house is in the centre, above Corrbridge Farm can be seen. It was formed by a family named Corr but the connection was coincidental.
[125]Hunslet Nelson Cricket Club, Gipsy Lane (Beeston) (1 comment)
Hunslet Nelson Cricket Club, Gipsy Lane2005. View of the single storey, brick built Hunslet Nelson Cricket Club in Gipsy Lane. It was founded in 1906.
[126]Hunslet RLFC, team photo (Hunslet)
Hunslet RLFC, team photoc1911. Image shows a Hunslet Rugby League Football Club team of around 1911. The club was formed in 1883 after Hunslet Cricket Club granted £30 to two local teams, Albion and Excelsior, to form the Hunslet Rugby Club and make use of their ground during the winter months. They were soon joined by another team, Imperial. In 1888 they played their first game at Parkside, the ground that was to be their home for the next 84 years. Hunslet were one of the 21 clubs that broke away from the Rugby Football Union in 1895 to form the Northern Union, later to become the Rugby Football League. They achieved great success in the early 1900s under the captaincy of Albert Goldthorpe, winning the Yorkshire Cup in 1905-06 then in 1907-08 becoming the first club to win "All Four Cups" - the Yorkshire Cup, the Yorkshire League Trophy, the Challenge Cup and the Championship Trophy.
[127]Ivegate, Cricketers Arms (Yeadon)
Ivegate, Cricketers ArmsUndated. Situated on Ivegate, this public house had a licence until the 1920s. It was demolished in the 1930s. This view shows demolition underway.
[128]Ivegate, Yeadon (Yeadon) (1 comment)
Ivegate, YeadonUndated. View of Ivegate, Yeadon, at the junction with Sandy Way. The building in the centre is a confectioners, listed in 1917 and 1920s Trade Directories as being run by a Sarah Ann Hancock. The end property of the row of buildings was demolished some time before the 1960s. Further back can be seen the Cricketers Arms, licensee William Marshall. The pub and the majority of the buildings around it were demolished in the 1950s, leaving the four terraced houses standing, and the area is now a car park. In the background, Manor Woollen Mills can be seen.
[129]J.& S. Rhodes Ltd, cricket team (Morley)
J.& S. Rhodes Ltd, cricket teamUndated. View of the cricket team of J.& S. Rhodes Ltd, owners of Prospect Mill, Queen's Mill and Valley Mill in Morley. The firm showed keen interest in providing sport for it's employees and had extensive playing fields and facilities on land between Dean Hall Mills and Nepshaw Lane. Photograph from the David Atkinson Archive.
[130]King George's Field, Brownberrie Lane, showing the Cricket Pavilion. (Horsforth) (1 comment)
King GeorgeUndated. View of King George's Field off Brownberrie Lane showing the cricket pavilion and cricket ground, home of Horsforth Cricket Club since 1870. The central building is an ex Army 'Nissan' type hut which was acquired by the club after the war and used as the pavilion. It came from Farnley Camp at Otley. The photograph most likely dates from the 1950s or 60s. King George's Field was formerly known as The Old Ball Field.
[131]Kirkstall Bridge, Temporary bridge (Kirkstall) (2 comments)
Kirkstall Bridge, Temporary bridge8th September 1910 Temporary timber bridge is being erected, for use during the building of new Kirkstall Bridge. On the left is the cricket ground, with Savins Mill which had been used as a woollen and fulling mill. This is now Morrisons Supermarket and other stores.
[132]Kirkstall Lane (Headingley)
Kirkstall LaneUndated, Taken in the early 1900s. View shows terraced housing on the left, on Kirkstall Lane looking towards the cricket ground and a lodge. Young children playing in the foreground.
[133]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion5th March 2011. View shows the new Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground, seen from Kirkstall Lane. Construction began in 2009 on this £21m development, a joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University. The award-winning design by Will Alsop of Alsop Sparch combines a cricket pavilion used during the summer months, complete with media, hospitality and player's facilities, with a teaching facility used during the academic year by LMU's school of tourism, hospitality and events management. It was opened on 21st July 2010 by the Duke of Gloucester on the occasion of a Test Match between Australia and Pakistan.
[134]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion5th March 2011. View shows the Kirkstall Lane entrance to the new Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground. The building, which opened on 21st July 2010, is a dual-use facility which combines teaching space for Leeds Metropolitan University's school of tourism, hospitality and events management with state-of-the-art cricket facilities which will enable Headingley to remain a top class Test Match venue.
[135]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion5th March 2011. View showing Headingley Cricket Ground's new Carnegie Pavilion on Kirkstall Lane. This state-of-the-art building was opened in 2010 as a joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University. It doubles as a teaching facility for LMU's school of tourism, hospitality and events management as well as a cricket pavilion. It was designed by architect Will Alsop to resemble a green cricket glove gripping a ball.
[136]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion7th March 2011. View of Kirkstall Lane showing the entrance to Headingley Carnegie Stadium, the sporting complex which currently houses Yorkshire County Cricket Club, Leeds Rhinos Rugby League Club and Leeds Carnegie Rugby Union Club. The new Carnegie Pavilion dominates the picture. This was opened in 2010 as a joint venture between Yorkshire CCC and Leeds Metropolitan University, providing up-to-date media and player's facilities, hospitality and teaching facilities all under one roof. It was designed by Will Alsop of Alsop Sparch architects.
[137]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion7th March 2011. Close-up view of Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, the new pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground, built in 2009-10 by Yorkshire County Cricket Club in partnership with Leeds Metropolitan University, who use the building during the academic year as teaching space for their school of tourism, hospitality and events management. The design, by architect Will Alsop, is said to resemble a green cricket glove gripping a ball. The view here is seen from Kirkstall Lane.
[138]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction5th September 2009. View showing the construction of the Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground, situated on Kirkstall Lane. The building is still in the relatively early stages of development, after work commenced in March 2009. This joint project between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University covers as area of 4,000 square metres and cost £21 million to build. Opened by the Duke of Gloucestor on 21st July 2010, it operates during term time as LMU's school of tourism, hospitality and events management, converting to a cricket pavilion with press box for the summer. An advertisement for Seabrook's potato crisps is seen on the wall in front.
[139]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction9th November 2009. View shows the Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground under construction. This state-of-the-art complex which opened on 21st July 2010 was a joint project between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University, combining modern media, hospitality and player's facilities with teaching space for the university.
[140]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction9th November 2009. View of Kirkstall Lane showing work in progress on the construction of the £21 million Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground. Mostly funded by Leeds Metropolitan University, this was a joint project between the university and Yorkshire County Cricket Club providing facilities for both, with the lecture theatres and teaching rooms used by LMU during the academic year being converted into a state-of-the-art media centre and hospitality suites, plus players' changing rooms and treatment rooms during the cricket season.
[141]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction13th July 2009. View from Kirkstall Lane showing work in progress on the construction of the Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground. Work had started in March 2009 on this £21 million joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University and it would be opened on 21st July 2010 by the Duke of Gloucester during the Australia-Pakistan Test Match. Adverts for Seabrook's Potato Crisps can be seen.
[142]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction23rd November 2009. View shows construction in progress on the Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground on Kirkstall Lane. Several workmen can be seen. An advert for Seabrook's Potato Crisps adorns the wall in front. The Carnegie Pavilion, which opened on 21st July 2010, was a joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University.
[143]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction23rd November 2009. View shows work in progress on the building of the Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground, situated on Kirkstall Lane. Designed by Will Alsop of Alsop Sparch architects, the pavilion was a joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University. It opened on 21st July 2010.
[144]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction23rd November 2009. Close-up view showing part of the new Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground during construction. Work started on this joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University in March 2009 and it was opened on 21st July 2010.
[145]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction26th November 2009. View of Kirkstall Lane showing construction work in progress on the new Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground, the home of Yorkshire County Cricket Club, who built this pavilion in partnersip with Leeds Metropolitan University. Opened in 2010, it is used as university premises during term time and transforms into a cricket pavilion in the summer.
[146]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction26th November 2009. Close-up view of part of the Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground, showing construction work in progress. Scaffolding and two workers can be seen. Construction began in March 2009 and the new pavilion was opened on 21st July 2010, during a Test Match between Australia and Pakistan. The premises are shared between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University.
[147]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction27th May 2010. View of Kirkstall Lane showing construction in progress at the Carnegie Pavilion at Headingley Cricket Ground. The building work appears to be nearing completion ready for its opening on 21st July 2010. The pavilion, a joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University, who will share its use, was designed by Will Alsop of Alsop Architects, now part of Alsop Sparch.
[148]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction29th September 2009. View looking north-east along Kirkstall Lane, showing, on the right, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion under construction. This was to be the new state-of-the-art pavilion of Headingley Cricket Ground, part of Headingley Carnegie Stadium. A joint project between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University, it was opened in July 2010. The junction with Headingley Crescent is seen on the left.
[149]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Carnegie Pavilion, under construction29th September 2009. View shows construction work in progress at Headingley Carnegie Pavilion on Kirkstall Lane. This joint venture between Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Leeds Metropolitan University was to provide teaching space for the University's school of tourism, hospitality and events management as well as a state-of-the-art pavilion for Headingley Cricket Grouond. The view looks from Headingley View showing the rear of nos. 3 and 1 Headingley Crescent on the left.
[150]Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Cricket Ground (Headingley)
Kirkstall Lane, Headingley Cricket Groundc1890. View inside the Headingley Cricket Ground off Kirkstall Lane, taken sometime around the opening of the ground in 1890. The first match was played between Leeds CC and Scarborough on the 27th May that year. Yorkshire County Cricket Club played their first game here in June 1891 and have continued to play at the ground ever since.