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Location - Leeds & District

[1]Aerial View, including Civic Hall, Town Hall (City Centre) (9 comments)
Aerial View, including Civic Hall, Town Hall1947 This aerial view looks across the administrative heart of Leeds City Centre. In the centre of the left edge the Gothic Revival style frontage of Leeds General Infirmary can be seen, facing onto Great George Street. Two of the original carved stone and brick wings designed by G.G. Scott are visible, completed in 1868. Another wing was added by G. Corson in 1892 with the more modern Brotherton Wing extending the hospital site to Calverley Street completed in 1940. The semi-circular balconies on the end of this wing are clearly visible. Moving right is the portland stone Civic Hall, designed by E.V. Harris, the hall was opened in 1933 by King George V and Queen Mary. Continuing right, the Leeds Institute is visible, recognisable by the roof of its centrally positioned circular lecture hall. Designed by C. Brodrick for the Leeds Mechanics Institute completed in 1868. Moving forwards towards the right edge is St Anne's Cathedral. In front of this, construction work is being carried out to extend the corner block of the Leeds Permanent Building Society (1930), which is just out of view, to its present site. The block of properties which follow to the left of this development are the Municipal Buildings (1884). These buildings originally housed civic offices along with Leeds Central Library. The first floor became the City of Leeds Police Headquarters and Criminal Investigation Department in 1934 with cells for prisoners created in the basement. The Leeds City Museum took over this floor in 1966 but moved out when the building closed for refurbishment between 1999 and 2000. It is now the home of Leeds Central Library. In the centre with a relatively flat facade, is the Leeds City Art Gallery established in 1888 when reading rooms within the Municipal Buildings were converted to a sculpture gallery. The present entrance (not in view) was the result of extensions and alterations made in 1982. Directly in front of these buildings is Centenary Street which was pedestrianised and paved over when the Garden of Remembrance and Victoria Gardens were enlarged. Victoria Gardens was created between 1936 and 1937 when the War Memorial was transferred there from City Square. On the right of this block is the site of what is now the Henry Moore Institute. This museum was converted from the three 19th century wool merchants offices seen here and opened in 1982. Opposite the Municipal Buildings, across Centenary Street and The Headrow is a pale coloured building which, like the Civic Hall is constructed from Portland Stone. This is Pearl Chambers and was built in 1910 as the premises of Pearl Life Assurance. A statue of its founder Patrick James Foley, stands on the roof. To the left of Pearl Chambers across East Parade, the back of the Jubilee Hotel is visible. This hotel was built in 1904 of Burmantofts terracotta and faces the Town Hall, designed by Cuthbert Brodrick and built from locally sourced gritstone. Building began in 1853, with the tower and dome following in 1857. The Town Hall was officially opened by Queen Victoria in 1858 although was not completed until 1860 when a bell was hung in the tower. The Town Hall was cleaned and restored in 1971, returning to its original glory. Victoria Square is situated in front of the building. The Square was altered in 1937 when the steps of the Town Hall were changed from the original bow shape to straight. Finally continuing left over Oxford Place is the Oxford Place Methodist Chapel. The foundation stone was laid in 1835 and the Chapel opened later that year. Sunday School buildings on Oxford Row were added in 1841. Refaced between 1896 and 1903, the Chapel suffered serious fire damage in 1911. Oxford Place Chambers, to the right of the church entrance on Oxford Place, is now the home of several counselling services including Relate.
[2]Aerial View, The Headrow (City Centre)
Aerial View, The Headrow1999 View looks from the top of the Town Hall onto The Headrow which runs through the centre of the photograph. In the bottom left corner is the roof of the Municipal Buildings with the Radisson SAS Hotel behind. Christmas lights hang above The Headrow. On the right West Riding House rides above the neighbouring buildings.
[3]Aerial View, The Headrow, Quarry Hill (City Centre)
Aerial View, The Headrow, Quarry Hill1938 View looks in an easterly direction along The Headrow towards Quarry Hill flats where the main entrance block of Oastler House is under construction. To the right of the flats is New York Road with Eastgate roundabout directly in front. Eastgate runs down the centre of the view before becoming The Headrow after the junction with Vicar Lane. The Headrow then continues towards the bottom right corner passing the newly completed Lewis's department store and the Leeds Permanent Building Society with the Municipal Buildings and the Town Hall below. The Civic Hall and Leeds General Infirmary are in the bottom left hand corner of the photograph. Part of the River Aire is just visible in the top right corner.
[4]Alexander Street (City Centre)
Alexander Street9th February 1967 Image shows a view down Alexander Street. On the left is the side wall of the Municipal Buildings, now the art gallery. At the end of the road is a cobbled yard where cars are parked. In the late 1990s the building on the corner of Great George Street and Cookridge Street became the Courtyard Bar and this yard a beer garden. On the right is the rear of buildings originally built in 1847 as offices and warehouses to the cloth trade, today this is the Henry Moore Centre (1992) for Sculpture.
[5]Alexander Street (City Centre)
Alexander Street9th February 1967 Image shows a view down Alexander Street past the war memorial, over Victoria Gardens and over The Headrow to the Eagle Star Insurance Group building. On the left is the rear of buildings originally built in 1847 as offices and warehouses for the cloth industry, today this is the Henry Moore Centre (1992) for Sculpture. On the right is the side wall of the Municipal Buildings, now the art gallery.
[6]Alexander Street, Art Gallery, rear view (City Centre)
Alexander Street, Art Gallery, rear viewJuly 1974. View of Alexander Street showing the rear of the Art Gallery. This part is the old Sam Wilson extension. On the right, the rear of the Municipal Buildings can be seen at the junction with Calverley Street.
[7]Alexander Street, looking east (City Centre)
Alexander Street, looking east13th September 1975. Looking east along Alexander Street from the Calverley Street end. On the right is the rear of the Municipal Buildings, then the lower building is Sam Wilson extension of the Art Gallery. On the left is the Education Board building then Alexander Court.
[8]Alexander Street, Municipal Buildings (City Centre)
Alexander Street, Municipal Buildings15th December 1936. View of Alexander Street to the rear of Municipal buildings and City Art Gallery. A coal cart can be seen parked on the left. Gateway leading into courtyard with municipal buildings visible on the right.
[9]Alexander Street, rear of Municipal Buildings. (City Centre)
Alexander Street, rear of Municipal Buildings.19th April 2007. View of Alexander Street showing, on the left, the rear of the Municipal Buildings, home to the Central Library. on the right, across Calverley Street, is a side view of the Town Hall.
[10]Art Gallery Entrance, Municipal Buildings (City Centre)
Art Gallery Entrance, Municipal Buildings2nd September 1912 View of entrance to the Art Gallery in municipal buildings. Exhibits can be seen in glass cases.
[11]Art Gallery Frontage, artists impression (City Centre)
Art Gallery Frontage, artists impression18th November 1936 Artists drawing of proposed Art Gallery Frontage.
[12]Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Galleryc.September 1981. View of the City Art Gallery on The Headrow during the construction of the Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery extension. Named after the famous Castleford-born sculptor and former Leeds College of Art student who laid the foundation stone on 10th April 1980, the Gallery was opened in 1982. Despite the work in progress and scaffolding around the building, people are still relaxing on the seats in Victoria Gardens in front. The Municipal Buildings can be seen on the left.
[13]Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Galleryc.September 1981. View of the City Art Gallery on The Headrow during the construction of the Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery Extension. The view looks from the war memorial in the foreground, across Victoria Gardens to the Municipal Buildings and Town Hall in the background.
[14]Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Galleryc1981-82. View of the City Art Gallery on The Headrow showing work in progress on the construction of the Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery extension. Scaffolding is still up but the work appears to be nearing completion. The Municipal Buildings and Town Hall can be seen in the background, with the junction with Calverley Street in between.
[15]Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Galleryc1981-82. View showing the Municipal Buildings and Art Gallery during the construction of extensions to the Gallery, including the Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery and the Craft Centre and Design Gallery. The view looks towards Cookridge Street with the Leeds Permanent Building Society on the right.
[16]Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery23rd March 1982. View of the Art Gallery seen during the construction of the Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery extension. This image looks from the open-air rooftop gallery towards the Municipal Buildings and Town Hall, with Oxford Place Chapel on the far left.
[17]Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery1982. View showing the Art Gallery following the construction of the new Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery at the front of the building. The work now appears virtually complete but the area is still fenced off while the finishing touches are applied. The Central Library and Museum are seen to the left with Stumps public house at basement level. Alexander Street is on the right. In the background St. Anne's cathedral and Leeds College of Technology can be seen against the skyline.
[18]Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, construction of Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery23rd March 1982. View of the City Art Gallery during the construction of the Henry Moore Sculpture Gallery extension. This view looks from the open-air rooftop gallery out onto The Headrow below. The Town Hall and Municipal Buildings are visible in the background.
[19]Art Gallery, Municipal Buildings (City Centre)
Art Gallery, Municipal Buildings7th September 1912 View of interior of Art Gallery in municipal buildings. Moulded and glazed wall tiles, round arched side aisles divided by granite columns can be seen.
[20]Art Gallery, refurbishment (City Centre)
Art Gallery, refurbishment19th April 2007. View of Leeds City Art Gallery taken during a £1.5 million refurbishment programme in early 2007. The archway on the left, just opened up, leads to adjoining Central Library through the newly restored Victorian Tiled Hall in the room that once house the Commercial and Technical Library. This is the first time since the 1950s that access to the Central Library has been possible from the building that was built as an extension to the Municipal Buildings in 1888.
[21]Art Gallery, rooftops (City Centre)
Art Gallery, rooftopsJuly 1974. View looking over the rooftops of the City Art Gallery from its rear on Alexander Street. In the foreground is the Sam Wilson extension, on the left the roof of the original Art Gallery building, and in the background the walls and roof of the Municipal Buildings.
[22]Art Gallery, Tiled Hall, Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, Tiled Hall, Sculpture Gallery1891. View of the Tiled Hall in the Municipal Buildings at the time that it was a Sculpture Gallery for the Art Gallery. Originally the Reading Room of the Central Library when it opened in 1884, it became part of the Art Gallery on its opening in 1888. In 1955 it reverted back to library use becoming the Commercial and Technical Library. Following restoration work it reopened in 2007 as a cafe serving both the Central Library and the Art Gallery.
[23]Art Gallery, Tiled Hall, Sculpture Gallery (City Centre)
Art Gallery, Tiled Hall, Sculpture GalleryUndated. View of the Tiled Hall in the Municipal Buildings, taken at the time it was used as a Sculpture Gallery for the Art Gallery, ie. sometime between 1888 and 1955. The archway at the back leads through to the main part of the Art Gallery. This room now serves as a cafe for the Gallery and the adjoining Central Library.
[24]Back Portland Crescent (City Centre)
Back Portland Crescent29th July 1930. Row of houses, small gardens, centre, garden walls with outside lavatory buildings. First on left has 'taxi' sign in bedroom window. In the centre in the distance is Leeds Town Hall. Municipal Buildings in the front. Small area of grass and trees surrounded by railings. House on right with gas light. Narrow cobbled street with iron grate in centre. Now area is part of Civic buildings.
[25]Calverley Street (City Centre) (2 comments)
Calverley Street1995, View looking from junction of Great George Street with Calverley Street visible. On the left is the former offices of the Leeds School and Education board and the Central Library (Municipal Building)
[26]Calverley Street (City Centre)
Calverley Street15th December 1908. View looking up Calverley Street to junction with Great George Street, prior to extension in 1914 Leeds Town Hall on the left. To the right, in foreground, end of Park Lane, then junction with Centenary Street, with Municipal Buildings which housed Civic Offices, Library and Art Gallery. Next junction with Alexander Street and Leeds School and Education Offices, which fronted on to Great George Street.
[27]Calverley Street (City Centre)
Calverley Street14th October 1928. On the extreme left are the Municipal Buildings, which is now the Central Library. The Leeds Permanent Building Society block was demolished, then cleared land created the Victoria Gardens in front of the library and the Garden of Rest for the war memorial, and for the Headrow to be widened. The narrowness of what was Park Lane is clearly shown. This view looks down the Headrow towards Briggate. To the right is the Pearl Assurance Building on the junction with East Parade. The building to the left of the Permanent Building Society was Calverley Chambers, occupied by a variety of offices. The Leeds Permanent Building Society bought 'buildings now occupied by Messrs. Swaine and Coleman at the corner of Park Lane, and Calverley Street, together with the land on which Mr. Thorpe has his sculpture works' for alteration and expansion as its headquarters, Victoria Chambers, in 1876. The former woollen warehouse required extensive adaptation, and the architecture was intended to complement that of the Municipal Buildings. When it was scheddduled for demolition under the scheme for widening the Headrow, the City Council offered the building society the site at the corner of Guildford Street and Cookridge Street for its new offices. The business was transferred to the present building in 1930. Pearl Buildings, on the extreme right, was built for Pearl Assuance in 1911 by William Bakewell, and was the first large-scale building in Leeds clad in Portland Stone. The statue of Patrickd James Foley, founder of Pearl Assurance, is just visible between the two turrets.
[28]Calverley Street extension (City Centre)
Calverley Street extension13th February 1914. Calverley Street, looking north towards Great George Street from Park Lane. Leeds Town Hall is on the left (Architect was Cuthbert Brodrick). Opened by Queen Victoria in 1858. One of four Lions by William Day Keyworth Jnr. can be seen, with policeman to the side. On the right can be seen the corner of the Municipal Buildings (second block from front), With street sign 'Centenary Street'. Opened in 1884 designed by George Corson they housed Civic offices and Library, Art Gallery. A hanging sign points the way in. Behind frontage on Great George Street are School and Education offices. Electric lights can be seen, (installed in 1884/85). Traffic consists of horse and carts and cars.
[29]Calverley Street showing Education Board Offices and the Municipal Buildings (City Centre) (1 comment)
Calverley Street showing Education Board Offices and the Municipal Buildings1968. Looking across Calverley Street. The Education Board Offices are on the left and the Municipal Buildings are in the foreground, right, housing the library. Both buildings were designed by architect George Corson.
[30]Calverley Street, Municipal Buildings (City Centre)
Calverley Street,  Municipal BuildingsJanuary 2000. View of Calverley Street showing the Municipal Buildings surrounded by scaffolding, covered with plastic sheeting. This was taken during the period that the Municipal Buildings, home to the Central Library, were closed for 10 months while essential fire safety work was carried out, along with some refurbishment. The view looks towards the Headrow and the Town Hall can be seen on the right.
[31]Calverley Street, Central Library (City Centre)
Calverley Street, Central Libraryc1999-2000. View showing the Calverley Street entrance of the Central Library in the Municipal Buildings, taken during the time that the buildings were closed to the public for 10 months for essential fire safety improvements and other work to be carried out, while the Library was housed in the Town Hall across the road.
[32]Calverley Street, Civic Court and Municipal Buildings (City Centre)
Calverley Street, Civic Court and Municipal BuildingsC1995. View of Calverley Street seen from the junction with Great George Street. On the left, displaying a large notice advertising 15,500 square feet of offices to let, is the former Leeds School Board and Education Department building, recently converted and renamed Civic Court. This was built in 1881 and designed by George Corson, who was also the architect of the Municipal Buildings (home of the Central Library and at the time the City Museum) which can be seen just to the right of it. On the far right of the photograph part of the Town Hall is visible.
[33]Calverley Street, Civic Court and Municipal Buildings. (City Centre) (3 comments)
Calverley Street, Civic Court and Municipal Buildings.C1995. View of Calverley Street from the junction with Great George Street. On the left is the former Leeds School Board and Education Department building, recently converted into offices and renamed Civic Court. A notice advertises 15,500 square feet of office space to let. Next to this, past the junction with Alexander Street, is the Municipal Buildings, home of the Central Library and at the time also the City Museum. Both of these buildings were designed by George Corson, the School Board built in 1881 and the Municipal Buildings in 1884.
[34]Calverley Street, Leeds Town Hall and Municipal Buildings (City Centre) (4 comments)
Calverley Street, Leeds Town Hall and Municipal BuildingsUndated. View of Calverley Street from The Headrow, showing the Town Hall on the left and the Municipal Buildings (Central Library and Museum) on the right. Taken before 1980 when Centenary Street still ran in front of the library.
[35]Calverley Street, Municipal Buildings, owls (City Centre)
Calverley Street, Municipal Buildings, owlsc1976-81. View shows the cast-iron railings outside the Municipal Buildings on Calverley Street, where two owl sculptures can be seen perched on top of the posts. These are part of a series of ten, arranged in pairs, and are just two of many owls to be found in different guises across the city. Their significance as a symbol of Leeds stems from the city's coat-of-arms, which was in turn inspired by the coat-of-arms of Sir John Savile, the first mayor, which also featured owls. Their contribution to Leeds' heritage has recently been celebrated by the introduction of the 'Leeds Owl Trail' which aims to educate and inspire people about the city's rich history.
[36]Calverley Street, Municipal Buildings, railings (City Centre)
Calverley Street, Municipal Buildings, railingsc1976-81. View shows the cast-iron railings outside the Municipal Buildings on Calverley Street. The railings are topped with a series of owl sculptures, arranged in pairs. The owl is a civic emblem of Leeds, appearing on its coat-of-arms, and these are just some of the many carvings of owls to be found at various locations across the city. They have recently been brought together in the 'Leeds Owl Trail' which encourages people to explore the rich heritage of the city.
[37]Calverley Street, Park Lane (Headrow) (City Centre)
Calverley Street, Park Lane (Headrow)1928 This view is looking down Guildford Street from the end of Park Lane. After redevelopment it was reclassified as The Headrow. On the left is Calverley Street with Calverley Chambers, offices for Leeds Permanent Buildings (on the left edge, then facing onto Centenary Street). The building society transferred to the new Permanent Buildings at the corner of Cookridge Street and the Headrow, now the Radisson Hotel, part of the 'Light' development. On the right is East Parade with the Pearl Assurance Building. This dates from 1911, built by William Bakewell. The area in front of the Municipal Buildings is now referred to as Victoria Gardens. The buildings are home to the Central Library and Leeds Art Gallery.
[38]Centenary Street (City Centre)
Centenary Street8th March 1932 View of yard off Centenary Street, commercial premises. The fire escape stairway is covered by streets of corrugated metal. 'To Let' sign on wall. This area lay immediately in front of the Municipal Buildings, which includes the Central Library. Now called Victoria Gardens.
[39]Centenary Street (City Centre) (2 comments)
Centenary Street30th April 1924 Yard off Centenary Street, which ran between Alexander Street and Calverley Street, immediately to the front of the Municipal Buildings (including Central Library). The street was demolished to create a public area for the Headrow, now called Victoria Gardens. This view shows two storey houses, with cellars, shutters to lower windows, Georgian style doorway detail. On the right, outside toilets, with fence screen.
[40]Centenary Street (City Centre)
Centenary Street8th March 1932 Looking towards Caleverley Street, Leeds Town Hall can be seen, then the spire of Oxford Place Chapel. Centenary Street consisted of mixed housing and commercial property and lay immediately in front of the Municipal Buildings. It was demolished to create public space, now called Victoria Gardens. View shows cobbled road, with parked cars.
[41]Centenary Street (City Centre)
Centenary Street8th March 1932 Street ran immediately in front of the Municipal Buildings (including Central Library), between Alexander Street and Calverley Street, this view looks towards Calverley Street. Leeds Town Hall is on the other side of Calverley Street. Beyond, the spire of Oxford Place Chapel. Centenary Street was demolished, the area is now a public space, called Victoria Gardens.
[42]Central Lending Library, interior view, Junior Room, Municipal Buildings (City Centre)
Central Lending Library, interior view, Junior Room, Municipal BuildingsUndated, A view of the Junior Room in the Central Lending Library located in the Municipal Buildings. Wooden shelving lining the walls displays various categories of junior fiction, e.g. 'school stories', and 'historical stories'. The counter is decorated with wood panelling. A mural is framed by one of the George Corson designed arches. It depicts some of the principal streets of Leeds and the River Aire with reference to the clothing industry, including a representation of Matthew Murray's steam engine.
[43]Central Lending Library, interior view, Municipal Buildings (City Centre)
Central Lending Library, interior view, Municipal BuildingsUndated, A view of the interior of the central lending library in the Municipal buildings. This is the adult non-fiction section with the history and travel sections in the foreground. The building was designed by George Corson and opened in 1884. Here, some of his architectural features can be appreciated, including the barrel vaulted ceiling, Romanesque arches and columns.
[44]Central Lending Library, Issuing Counter (City Centre)
Central Lending Library, Issuing CounterUndated. View of the issuing counter of the Central Lending Library, which, prior to 1934, was located on the first floor of the Municipal Buildings, Calverley Street. In 1934 it moved to the ground floor and the room became the general office of Leeds City Police Headquarters until 1965. Nowadays it has reverted to a library once more, housing the Art Library.
[45]Central Lending Library, Municipal Buildings (City Centre)
Central Lending Library, Municipal BuildingsUndated. Image shows the Central Lending Library located on the ground floor of the Municipal Buildings in Calverley Street. It shows the old entrance and counter, with turntables containing records of the books issued. The Central Library transferred from the first to the ground floor in 1934.
[46]Central Libary, Children's Event (City Centre)
Central Libary, Children19th July 1997. View of Leeds City Libraries' children's event held in Victoria Gardens outside the Central Library. A mobile library is present. On the right, the public house which occupies part of the basement of the Municipal Buildings, formerly Stumps, is at the time LS One.
[47]Central Library Plan (City Centre)
Central Library PlanJune 1901 Plan for central library. Architect is marked on plan as 'George Corson, architect 25 Cookridge Street Leeds'.
[48]Central Library, arch (City Centre)
Central Library, archUndated. View of a decorative archway in the Central Library, one of the distinctive architectural features found in the Municipal Buildings, designed in a Byzantine Romanesque style by George Corson in 1884.
[49]Central Library, architectural detail (City Centre)
Central Library, architectural detailJune 2000. View showing architectural details on a wall of the Central Library situated between the two main staircases. Intricate carvings can be seen, with arches and decorative windows, designed in a Byzantine Romanesque style by George Corson. Taken just before the Municipal Buildings re-opened in June 2000 after 10 months of closure for essential works.
[50]Central Library, Art Library (City Centre)
Central Library, Art Library19th April 2007. View of the new Art Library on the first floor of the Central Library, following reorganisation in which the Art and Music departments swapped places in order to enable new access from the adjoining Art Gallery to open up into and Art Library rather than a Music Library. This floor of the Municipal Buildings formerly housed the City Museum until it moved out in 1999.