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Results Found (18), Result Page (1 of 1)
Search Aspect (old infirmary )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]Central Library, Interior, Reference Library (City Centre)
Central Library, Interior, Reference LibraryUndated, The Reference Library of Leeds began in 1871 at the Old Infirmary, moving to its present location in 1884. The card catalogue was introduced in 1898 with reorganisation carried out in 1909 and 1938. Much of the card catalogue has been computerised. In this view the catalogue is organised by author and subject sequence.
[2]Central Library, Reference Library (City Centre)
Central Library, Reference LibraryUndated, In 1866 the Public Libraries Act had been adopted by Leeds, a few basic service points were established in the city. It was 1870 before the first Chief Librarian James Yates was appointed. The first reference library was opened in the old infirmary premises in 1871. There was a stock of 14,000 books. By 1879 it was obvious that the infirmary premises were inadequate, provision was made for Library Departments to be housed in the new Municipal buildings which opened in 1884. This view slows a packed library, with every seat taken by studious library users.
[3]Engraving of the new Municipal Buildings (City Centre) (1 comment)
Engraving of the new Municipal Buildings1884. An 1884 engraving of the new Municipal Buildings, designed to concentrate all the administrative council departments of Leeds under one roof. The competition for the new public offices had been announced in 1876, and the £300 prize was won by George Corson, the Dumfries-born architect who joined his brother's practice in leeds in 1849. In 1879 his design was amended to separate the building from the neighbouring School Board offices, which were opened in 1881. The Municipal Buildings were opened by the Mayor, Edwin Woodhouse, on 17th April 1884. The whole of the south side was taken up by the Central Library, which moved from its original premises, the Old Infirmary in Infirmary Street, in June of that year. It was thought at the time that "the space provided for the library in the Municipal Offices would be adequate for the requirements of a Central Library for at least twenty years" although the scheme was criticised for having the lending and reference departments at the top of the building. The City Museum began its move into the old Police Department in 1966, but a report by the City Engineer on the structural instability of the building delayed the opening of the museum until the 6th November 1969.
[4]Infirmary Street, postcard (City Centre)
Infirmary Street, postcardUndated. Postcard view looking north-west along Infirmary Street, so named because it was once the site of Leeds General Infirmary. On the left is the side of the General Post Office, then the Yorkshire Penny Bank, built in 1894 on the site of the old infirmary. Just visible on the right is part of the Standard Life Assurance building. The next building along, Post Office House, is home to London & Scottish Assurance Corporation Ltd. and A.W. Bain & Sons, insurance brokers, among others.
[5]Infirmary, Infirmary Street (City Centre) (1 comment)
Infirmary, Infirmary StreetUndated. View of the Old Infirmary on Infirmary Street, which replaced the temporary arrangement of a house leased from Andrew Wilson in 1767, located in Kirkgate. The surgeon, William Hey was one of the founder members of this original infirmary. The new infirmary was built by John Carr between 1768 - 1771 at a cost of £4599. In 1782 an extension costing £500 was added, this allowed for 68 patient beds. Another was added in 1786 with 20 beds, then a fourth top storey in 1792. Benefactor Richard Fountayne Wilson bought adjacent land which he then gave to the Infirmary to create gardens for the hospital, this was in 1818. The demolition of this building took place in 1893, a stone pillar was kept which is at the rear of the Hotel Metropole. A branch of the Yorkshire Penny Bank was built on the site in 1894. Photography by Wormald of Leeds (Edmund Wormald, 46 Great George Street).
[6]Kirkgate, the first Leeds Infirmary, watercolour painting (City Centre)
Kirkgate, the first Leeds Infirmary, watercolour painting1767. Black and white image taken from a watercolour painting presented to Leeds General Infirmary by Dr. J.R.H. Towers. It depicts the house where the infirmary originated in 1767. On 20th May 1767 a meeting, advertised in the Leeds Intelligencer, was held to 'consider of the expediency of an infirmary'. At that time the population of Leeds was around 17,000 and there was no hospital as such. In July of that year it was decided to rent this house, located in a yard off Kirkgate, from the owner, Andrew Wilson, at £16 per annum. One of the founders, surgeon William Hey, (1736-1819) was appointed along with 3 other surgeons, Mr. Billam, Mr. Jones and Mr. Lucas. Doctors, Hird & Crowther were appointed as physicians and Mrs. Mary Turner, aged 50, was allocated a salary of £10 per year as Matron. When the infirmary opened on 2nd October 1767 three patients were admitted, Thomas Walker, Mary Taylor and Peter Brown. By 1768 there were 76 in-patients and 155 out-patients. By 1770 the numbers had risen to 159 and 675 respectively. Patients were given a diet of boiled meat 3 times per week and rice and milk on alternate days. Land was acquired in 1768 for the building of the new infirmary near to the Mixed Cloth Hall. (now occupied by the General Post Office building on City quare). The new infirmary opened on 1st March 1771. It stood on the site later occupied by the Yorkshire Penny Bank building in Infirmary Street. The yard housing the premises of the original infirmary, seen here, became known as Old Infirmary Yard and was located at number 123 Kirkgate.
[7]Leeds Libraries Jubilee Exhibition, Art Gallery (City Centre)
Leeds Libraries Jubilee Exhibition, Art Gallery11th November 1920. This exhibition celebrated fifty years of public library services in Leeds. After the Public Libraries Act was adopted in 1868, the first branch library was opened in the Mechanics Institute in Hunslet in 1870. In the same year, James Yates was appointed as the chief librarian. A reference library with 14,151 volumes opened in the Old Infirmary in 1871, joined by the Central Lending Library the following year which had 8,000 books. By 1879, 22 branch libraries had been opened across the city. In 1884 the Central Library was tranferred to the new Municipal Buildings where it is still housed today. The Golden Jubilee celebrations seen here were held in October to November 1920, in the form of an exhibition held in the adjoining Art Gallery. On display were early printed books, maps, manuscripts and charts. The chief librarian, Thomas Hand, produced a brief history of the library service to coincide with it. The room in which the display was held is now the Henry Moore Lecture Theatre.
[8]Old Infirmary (City Centre)
Old Infirmary1893 This photo shows the demolition of the Old Infirmary, which was situated on Infirmary Street. This hospital, begun in 1768 by John Carr was demolished in 1893. It was replaced by the present Leeds General Infirmary designed by George Gilbert Scott on Great George Street, opening in 1869. When its use as a hospital ceased, the Old Infimary was used for various purposes including a public library.
[9]Old Infirmary (City Centre)
Old Infirmary1893 The first Infirmary in Leeds was begun by William Hey, surgeon. He founded this hospital at his home in Kirkgate in 1767. This was a temporary arrangement, between 1768-1771 John Carr designed and built a new infirmary. It cost £4599 and was situated on what is now called Infirmary Street. In 1782 an extension costing £500 was added, this allowed for 68 patient beds. Another was added in 1786 with 20 beds, then a fourth top storey in 1792. Benefactor Richard Fountayne Wilson bought adjacent land which he then gave to the Infirmary to create gardens for the hospital, this was in 1818. The demolition of this building took place in 1893, a stone pillar was kept which is at the rear of the Hotel Metropole. A branch of the Yorkshire Penny Bank was built on the site. This photo is of the demolition.
[10]Old Infirmary (City Centre) (2 comments)
Old Infirmary1806. Old infirmary, Infirmary Street from the north east. Opened in 1771 and later site of the Yorkshire Penny Bank. Artist: Schwanfelder, engraver: Livesey.
[11]Old Infirmary and Gardens, south view (City Centre)
Old Infirmary and Gardens, south viewUndated, View south from the gardens at the rear of the old Leeds General Infirmary, built between 1768 and 1771. The building was designed by John Carr and cost £4599. It replaced the previous temporary premises (1767)of surgeon, william Hey's house in Kirkgate. By 1782 the hospital had been extended to accommodate 68 beds. It increased its capacity to 88 in 1786 with the addition of a third floor and again to 108 when a new top storey was costructed in 1792. Richard Fountayne Wilson acquired 4000 square yards of land which he purchased for £1,500. He then gave the land to the infirmary in 1818 in order that the gardens could be extended further. The old infirmary was demolished in 1893 and the Yorkshire Penny Bank was built on the site in 1894. A gentleman in top hat is visible, seated in the grounds. Photography by Wormald of Leeds (Edmund Wormald, 46 Great George Street).
[12]Old Infirmary, close-up of demolition (City Centre)
Old Infirmary, close-up of demolition1893. Close-up view of the demolition of the Old Infirmary on Infirmary Street. The site was later used for the Yorkshire Penny Bank.
[13]Old Infirmary, demolition (City Centre)
Old Infirmary, demolition1893. View of the Old Infirmary on Infirmary Street during demolition in 1893. It had closed after the new Leeds General Infirmary had opened on Great George Street in 1868 and admitted its first patient in 1869. A horse and cart with workmen can be seen on the image with a group of on-lookers to the left. The Yorkshire Penny Bank was later built on this site.
[14]Old Infirmary, Infirmary Street (City Centre)
Old Infirmary, Infirmary StreetUndated, Print of the Old Infirmary on Infirmary Street. This was planned in 1767 and designed and built by John Carr between 1768 and 1771. 27 beds were provided. An additional wing was added in 1782 and another in 1786. The whole building then formed three sides of a quadrangle. An attic storey was added to the central part of the building in 1792 and beds for inpatients was increased to 99. The building was demolished in 1893 and a branch of the Yorkshire Penny Bank built on the site.
[15]Old Infirmary, Infirmary Street (City Centre) (2 comments)
Old Infirmary, Infirmary StreetUndated. View of the infirmary which was probably opened in 1770 and used 1771-1869. The new infirmary was opened in 1868. Later the site of the Yorkshire Bank and Burden Chambers. Then used for library and offices. From Mr Brown's photographs of old Leeds.
[16]Old Infirmary, Infirmary Street (City Centre)
Old Infirmary, Infirmary StreetUndated. Rear view of infirmary taken from the south east. Trees covered in blossom obscure the building. There is a footpath in the grounds and 2 people are sitting on a bench. The infirmary was used from 1771-1869 and afterwards became a public library. Later the site of the Yorkshire Penny Bank.
[17]The Old Infirmary by Percy Robinson (City Centre)
The Old Infirmary by Percy RobinsonUndated. Print showing 'The Old Infirmary' by Percy Robinson.
[18]Yorkshire Bank, Infirmary Street (City Centre)
Yorkshire Bank, Infirmary Street16th November 1999. View of traffic on Infirmary Street. The building is the Yorkshire Bank which was opened on the site of the old infirmary in 1894 by the Duke of Devonshire using a golden key. The bank was originally known as the Yorkshire Penny Bank, but it change its name to the Yorkshire Bank in May 1959.