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Results Found (2142), Result Page (1 of 429)
Search Aspect (shops )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
1880s poster, Emanuel Mortimer's grocery store, Lowtown (Pudsey)
Black & White imagec1880s. Image shows the detail on an advertising poster for Emanuel Mortimer's grocery store located in Lowtown at the corner of Crimbles Road, (now Kent Road). Loose tea was on sale, varying in price from 1s 2d and 2 shillings per pound, depending on quality. The tea blends have interesting names like 'Rich Marvellous Tea', 'Malty Morning', Tea of Emotional Strength' and 'Pure Economical Soo-Moo'. The poster states that 'E. Mortimer is amongst the largest buyers of the 19th century, and sells at Wholesale Merchants Prices, thus saving his customers 20 to 30 per cent compared with ordinary dealers.' Sugar is also advertised in differing varieties. At this time Emanuel Mortimer had another shop in Lowtown, at the corner with Hammerton Fold and run by his nephew, James Booth. The two shops were known as the 'top' and 'bottom' shop. This poster refers to the bottom shop and it had a different customer base to the top shop. It catered more for the working class in the locality whereas the top shop supplied to the middle classes, tradesmen and shopkeepers. Image and information courtesy of John Garnett.
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[2]
1880s poster, Emanuel Mortimer's grocery store, Lowtown (Pudsey)
Black & White imagec1880s. Black and white poster advertising some of the many groceries on sale at Emanuel Mortimer's shop in the 1880s. These include dried fruits and tinned fruit in syrup. There are tinned meats, including 2lb tins of finest boiled rabbit for 1s and 1d, and fish, like lobster at 7½d for a 1lb tin. Fresh butter is supplied twice a week and comes from Denmark and Ireland. There are several brands of soap, varying in price and quality. Pears soap, a glycerine based soap, first produced by Andrew Pears in 1789, can still be purchased today although the formula has changed over the years. Emanuel Mortimer had two grocer's shops, both located in Lowtown and referred to as the 'top' and 'bottom' shop. The one advertised in this poster is the bottom shop, situated at the corner with Crimbles Road (nowadays Kent Road). It catered more for the working classes while the top shop, at the junction with Hammerton Fold, later to be known as Booth's Yard, attracted customers from the middle classes. Image and information courtesy of John Garnett.
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[3]
Abbey Gatehouse, north of Kirkstall Abbey, lithograph (Kirkstall) (2 comments)
Black & White imageAugust 1820 Image shows a lithograph from 1820 depicting the gatehouse to the north of Kirkstall Abbey. This was before the new turnpike road was built in 1827. The gatehouse was first converted to a residence by John Ripley, the last abbot, who lived there until his death in 1568. For the next three hundred years it existed as a farmhouse and this is how we see it in this lithograph. Later, it became a gentlemans residence and was occupied by the Butler family. Eventually, Colonel Thomas Walter Harding of the Tower Works, Holbeck owned the gatehouse until he sold it to Leeds City Council in 1925. It is now part of Abbey House Museum and has only recently undergone a £2.3 million restoration, including additions to the Victorian Streets and shops.
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[4]
Abbey House Museum, Harewood Square (Kirkstall) (2 comments)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows Harewood Square, a Victorian street reconstruction in the Abbey House Museum. This half timbered Tudor Building is a genuine 17th century surviver from Leeds. Shops housed in this building include an apothecary on the left and on the right a watchmaker's is located in the narrow alley.
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[5]
Abbey House Museum, Harewood Square (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows the John Dyson watchmaker and repairer, Harewood Square, one of the atmospheric shops and streets reconstructed in the Abbey House Museum. Through the window can be seen clocks, pocket watches and repairing equiptment.
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