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Location - City Centre

[6]
7th Lord Mayor's Parade, Woodhouse Moor showing a young participant (City Centre)
Colour image21st June 1980. Image taken during the 7th Lord Mayor's Parade which started from Woodhouse Moor. The little girl, in her fancy costume, is seated on the float entered by Lewis's department store depicting a steam engine of the American West. The engine is constructed using bales of straw, but on the outside it was completely covered in over 20,000 ribbon bows in red, green and gold. The little girl wears a sequinned, layered net skirt and a silver cape trimmed with swansdown. She carries a wand with silver bells, beads and trailing white ribbons. It was a cold, showery day but a successful one for Lewis's as the store won 'The Lord's Mayor's Award for the Best Overall Entry.
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[7]
A Children's Ward, postcard (City Centre)
Black & White imagec1906. Postcard showing a children's ward, possibly at Leeds General Infirmary. A postmark of 21st December 1906 is stamped on the back.
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[8]
A Remnant of Old Briggate, postcard (City Centre) (6 comments)
Black & White imageUndated. This postcard, entitled 'A Remnant of Old Briggate', shows no. 56, one of the oldest buildings on Briggate. It was built in 1613 by Richard Sykes, who became an Alderman of Leeds in 1629, having been a key figure in the campaign for the granting of Leeds' Charter of Incorporation in 1626. The building is occupied here by F. Wallis, hosier and glover; the words 'Ye Olde Stone Shoppe' are seen above the name, and a panel above this says 'RS1613'. It was taken over by Timpsons's Shoes in 1919 and demolished by them in 1955 to make way for a new shop. The entrance to the Pack Horse Inn Yard is incoporated into the building on the left.
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[9]
A young boy models a Hussar overcoat for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. In this image a young boy models a Hussar overcoat made by the clothing manufacturing firm John Barran & Sons. At the time of the photograph, the firm was located in a building designed by Thomas Ambler and completed in 1877, in St.Paul's Street with views onto the Georgian Park Square. There was also an additional factory built in 1888 in Hanover Lane as the company expanded over the years. Clothing manufactured for boys was a major part of Barran's business and orders for these ready-to-wear, miniature suits and coats arrived from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. Some of the clothes were designed as fancy dress, for example, pirate's costumes, guardsman's and beefeater's uniforms. The young 'model' is Herbert Giles (b.1885) who was the son of Arthur Giles, a sewing machine fitter (machine smith) at John Barran's. on the 1891 Census Herbert was listed with his family at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet.
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[10]
A young boy models a sailor suit for the clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. (City Centre)
Black & White imageC1891. A little boy dressed in a Sailor Suit poses for the camera for the firm of clothing manufacturer's John Barran & Sons. The trade in ready-to-wear tailoring for boys was an important part of the business at this time. The Sailor Suit was popular but there was also a demand for fancy dress and these were exported to Canada, Austrailia, New Zealand, South Africa, South America and the Continent. The boy in this image is is Herbert, whose father was a Machine Smith employed by Barran's, name of Arthur Giles. The Giles family are listed on the 1891 Census as living at number 1 Stratford Street in Hunslet. John Barran began his career in Leeds at the age of 22 with a small shop at number 30 Bridge End South. By 1851 he had moved to number 1 Briggate but his recognition of the potential of the new American invention of the sewing machine led him to opening a factory in Alfred Street. The business really took off when he worked with the firm of Greenwood and Batley to produce the band knife for bulk pattern cutting. The rapid expansion of the ready-to-wear business for Barran's in Leeds meant several moves. By the time the new warehouse in Chorley Lane opened in 1904, which adjoined the factory of 1888 in Hanover Lane, 3,000 people were in the employment of John Barran & Sons.
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